EVENTS

Water Street Music Hall - Rochester, NY

Jul 29

Jul 29

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $32-$75

Event Information

16+ w/ ID


 


VIP Soundcheck Party Early Entry. 


Soundcheck Party will start 90 minutes before doors at 5:30 pm and will last approx 45 min.  Please arrive 30 minutes prior. 


"Dweezil Zappa Guitar Masterclass- Dweezilla On The Road"


For The price of a fuzz pedal, learn techniques from the son of Frank Zappa


Dweezil Zappa's music camp Dweezilla has a motto "Learn And Destroy." It refers to destroying the boundaries that confine music creativity. At camp students are in total immersion for 4 days of music instruction. While on tour with Zappa Plays Zappa Dweezil will be previewing some of the guitar concepts he teaches at camp in a special event prior to each concert.

"I transformed my guitar technique before starting Zappa Plays Zappa out of necessity to play my dad's most sophisticated and challenging melodies. I've found a lot of exciting new approaches to the guitar. started Dweezilla music camp as a way to share this information with guitarists. I'm excited to present an opportunity to share thoughts on my approach to guitar with students of all levels before each show on tour."


MasterClass begins at 3:00 pm. Bring your guitars and arrive 30 minutes before the class begins

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Dinosaur Jr

Jul 31

Jul 31

Doors open at 5:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $15-$45

Event Information

"Tommy the Cat." "John the Fisherman." "Jerry Was A Race Car Driver." "My Name is Mud." "Wynona's Big Brown Beaver." Yessiree, Primus is responsible for some of the most cutting edge and original rock music of the 1990's. And now, the definitive Primus line-up - singer/bassist Les Claypool, guitarist Larry LaLonde, and drummer Tim Alexander - is back together and planning on getting the worldwide masses bobbing up and down in unison once more. Although originally formed in 1984, it was not until shortly before the end of the decade that the aforementioned classic line-up was solidified. With most hard rock/heavy metal acts at the time either neatly falling into either "thrash" or "glam" categories, Primus joined a variety of underground bands that refused to be pigeonholed (and by the early '90s, had fully infiltrated the mainstream) - merging metal, funk, alternative, punk, country, roots rock, and experimental music, along with Claypool's penchant for witty and often humorous storytelling lyrics. Building a large and loyal following first in and around San Francisco (before eventually, going global), Primus kicked things off with a string of releases that are now considered classic alt-rock titles - 1989's 'Suck on This,' 1990's 'Frizzle Fry,' 1991's 'Sailing the Seas of Cheese,' 1993's 'Pork Soda,' and 1995's 'Tales from the Punchbowl.' Along the way, Primus toured with some of rock's biggest names (Jane's Addiction, Public Enemy, Rush, U2, etc.), headlined the third-ever Lollapalooza Festival, and issued a variety of crafty music videos, which stood out in sharp contrast to the ultra-seriousness of most other video clips at the time. Alexander exited Primus in 1996, but returned in 2003, in time for an EP/DVD set, 'Animals Should Not Try to Act Like People,' and a sold out reunion tour, that lasted over the next few years, before the drummer departed once more. But as Claypool got to work on putting together a forthcoming book about the band's history, Les began longing for the days of when Alexander's unmistakable and powerful drumming provided the beat. A phone call was placed, a conversation ensued, and before you could say, "Here come the bastards," the Claypool-LaLonde-Alexander line-up was back in business. Plans to tour the world over and offering up new music are already in place. Be forewarned…here they come!

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

with Underwater Tiger & NOTO

Jul 31

Jul 31

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $10

Event Information

Age policy: 18+ with ID / under 18 with a parent or guardian

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Richard Julian

Aug 1

Aug 1

Doors open at 4:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $15-$80.50

Event Information

With the release of her nineteenth album, Slipstream, Bonnie Raitt is starting anew. The album marks her return to studio recording after seven years; it's coming out as the launch of her own label, Redwing Records; and it delivers some of the most surprising and rewarding music of her remarkable career, thanks in part to some experimental sessions with celebrated producer Joe Henry. The years before and after Raitt's last album, 2005's acclaimed Souls Alike, weren't an easy time for her, with the passing of parents, her brother, and a best friend. So after following that album with her usual long run of touring—winding up with the "dream come true" of the "BonTaj Roulet" revue with Taj Mahal in 2009 and a triumphant appearance at the all-star Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 25th anniversary concerts the same year— she decided to step back and recharge for a while. "I took a hiatus from touring and recording to get back in touch with the other part of my life," she says. "On the road, under stress, it's hard to stay in balance and move forward." Excited to have time at home and with her family and friends, she could go to the symphony, check out live jazz and Cuban shows, and so much else. She continued her ongoing political work, helping to organize NukeFree.org in 2007 and supporting her favorite non-profit organizations. "I didn't have to be the professional version of myself for a long time," she says. "It wasn't so much a vacation as a chance to take care of a lot of neglected areas of my life, a lot of processing after all that loss and activity." When she started thinking about making music again, Bonnie knew she needed to try something out of the ordinary. "I was really interested in working with different people, and someone I had always been drawn to was Joe Henry," she says. "I'm a big fan of his writing and albums and love the work he's done producing Allen Toussaint, Solomon Burke, and others. I thought it would be really intriguing to see what we could come up with. Coincidentally, he had been wanting to call me as well. Our first phone call lasted over two hours." They found a brief window when Henry's usual crew of musicians was available, augmented by a new friend of Bonnie's, the magnificent guitarist Bill Frisell. "I didn't have to produce or get the band together, I could just show up and sing," she says. "I came to Joe's with, to use a Zen expression, 'beginner's mind.'" The experiment yielded eight songs in 48 hours, and Raitt was inspired to get back to work full force. "I loved singing these songs and playing with these guys so much," she says, "This was just the jumpstart I needed to get me back in the saddle and wanting to work on a new album." She plans to release the full results of the Joe Henry sessions down the line, but for now she chose to include four of these tracks on Slipstream —the Henry originals "You Can't Fail Me Now" (co-written with Loudon Wainwright III) and "God Only Knows," and two songs from Bob Dylan's Time Out of Mind album, "Million Miles" and "Standing in the Doorway." A few months later, Raitt gathered her long-time touring bandmates—George Marinelli on guitar, James "Hutch" Hutchinson on bass, and Ricky Fataar on drums—along with a new addition and an old friend on keys, Mike Finnigan (Taj Mahal; Joe Cocker; Crosby, Stills and Nash) in a Los Angeles studio. Bonnie was also pleased to have Maia Sharp, one of her favorite artists and a collaborator on Souls Alike, joining her team once again, adding back-up vocals to several songs. Raitt retained Henry's engineer, Ryan Freeland (Ray LaMontagne, Ramblin' Jack Elliot, Aimee Mann), whom she loved working with, as a way to unify the project's sound. The band went straight to work and quickly recorded a slew of songs Raitt had been collecting over the last few years. Where Raitt's last several albums concentrated on material from lesser-known and younger songwriters, Slipstream draws from more of her contemporaries, including Paul Brady and Michael O'Keefe's "Marriage Made in Hollywood" and a reggae-fied version of Gerry Rafferty's "Right Down the Line." Her longtime friend Al Anderson, formerly of NRBQ, contributes three songs and plays on four; his hard-bopping guitar work adds to the general sense of six-string gunslinging throughout the album. "One of the new things about this record is that we let the guitar jams go on for a while," says Raitt. George and I got into some rockin' back and forth like we do live, and I had a ball going head-to-head with Al Anderson, one of my all-time favorite guitarists, on his 'Split Decision.' More than just a best-selling artist, respected guitarist, expressive singer, and accomplished songwriter, Bonnie Raitt has become an institution in American music. Born to a musical family, the nine-time Grammy winner, who Rolling Stone named one of the "100 Greatest Singers of All Time," is the daughter of celebrated Broadway singer John Raitt (Carousel, Oklahoma!, The Pajama Game) and accomplished pianist/singer Marge Goddard. She was raised in Los Angeles in a climate of respect for the arts, Quaker traditions, and a commitment to social activism. A Stella guitar given to her as a Christmas present launched Bonnie on her creative journey at the age of eight. While growing up, though passionate about music from the start, she never considered that it would play a greater role than as one of her many growing interests. In the late '60s, restless in Los Angeles, she moved east to Cambridge, Massachusetts. As a Harvard/Radcliffe student majoring in Social Relations and African Studies, she attended classes and immersed herself in the city's turbulent cultural and political activities. "I couldn't wait to get back to where there were folkies and the antiwar and civil rights movements," she says. "There were so many great music and political scenes going on in the late '60s in Cambridge." Also, she adds, with a laugh, "the ratio of guys to girls at Harvard was four to one, so all of those things were playing in my mind." Raitt was already deeply involved with folk music and the blues at that time. Exposure to the album Blues at Newport 1963 at age 14 had kindled her interest in blues and slide guitar, and between classes at Harvard she explored these and other styles in local coffeehouse gigs. Three years after entering college, Bonnie left to commit herself full-time to music, and shortly afterward found herself opening for surviving giants of the blues. From Mississippi Fred McDowell, Sippie Wallace, Son House, Muddy Waters, and John Lee Hooker she learned first-hand lessons of life as well as invaluable techniques of performance. "I'm certain that it was an incredible gift for me to not only be friends with some of the greatest blues people who've ever lived, but to learn how they played, how they sang, how they lived their lives, ran their marriages, and talked to their kids," she says. "I was especially lucky as so many of them are no longer with us." Word spread quickly of the young red-haired blueswoman, her soulful, unaffected way of singing, and her uncanny insights into blues guitar. Warner Bros. tracked her down, signed her up, and in 1971 released her debut album, Bonnie Raitt. Her interpretations of classic blues by Robert Johnson and Sippie Wallace made a powerful critical impression, but the presence of intriguing tunes by contemporary songwriters, as well as several examples of her own writing, indicated that this artist would not be restricted to any one pigeonhole or style. Over the next seven years she would record six albums. Give It Up, Takin' My Time, Streetlights, and Home Plate were followed in 1977 by Sweet Forgiveness, which featured her first hit single, a gritty Memphis/R&B arrangement of Del Shannon's "Runaway." Three Grammy nominations followed in the 1980s, as she released The Glow, Green Light, and Nine Lives. A compilation of highlights from these Warner Bros. albums (plus two previously unreleased live duets) was released as The Bonnie Raitt Collection in 1990. All of these Warners albums have been digitally remastered and re-released. In between sessions, when not burning highways on tour with her band, she devoted herself to playing benefits and speaking out in support of an array of worthy causes, campaigning to stop the war in Central America; participating in the Sun City anti-apartheid project; performing at the historic 1980 No Nukes concerts at Madison Square Garden; co-founding MUSE (Musicians United for Safe Energy); and working for environmental protection and for the rights of women and Native Americans. After forging an alliance with Capitol Records in 1989, Bonnie achieved new levels of popular and critical acclaim. She won four Grammy Awards in 1990—three for her Nick of Time album and one for her duet with John Lee Hooker on his breakthrough album, The Healer. Within weeks, Nick of Time shot to number one (it is now certified quintuple platinum). Luck of the Draw (1991, seven-times platinum) brought even more success, firing two hit singles— "Something to Talk About" and "I Can't Make You Love Me" —up the charts, and adding three more Grammys to her shelf. The double-platinum Longing in Their Hearts, released in 1994, featured the hit single "Love Sneakin' Up On You" and was honored with a Grammy for Best Pop Album. It was followed in 1995 by the live double CD and film Road Tested (now available on DVD). After all the awards and honors and decades of virtually non-stop touring under her belt, Bonnie continued her activism and guesting on numerous friends' records, including Ruth Brown, Charles Brown, Keb' Mo, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, and Bruce Cockburn, as well as tribute records for Richard Thompson, Lowell George, and Pete Seeger. She picked up another Grammy in 1996 for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for her collaboration on "SRV Shuffle" from the all-star Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan, and continued her "dual career," performing with her father, John, in concerts as well as on his Grammy-nominated album, Broadway Legend, released in 1995. In 1998, she returned to the studio with a new collaborative team to create Fundamental, one of her most exploratory projects, signaling her growing desire to "shake things up a bit." Inspired by the music of Zimbabwean world-beat master Oliver Mtukudzi, Bonnie wrote "One Belief Away," the first single, with Paul Brady and Dillon O'Brian. In March of 2000, Bonnie was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame; this was followed by her welcome into the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame, along with her father, in June 2001. Over the years, Bonnie has appeared as a guest on over 100 album projects, as chronicled in the discography section of her official website. She continues to stretch the boundaries, performing with artists as varied as Cape Verdean singer Cesaria Evora, and legends B.B.King, Tony Bennett, and Willie Nelson. After the Fundamental tour, she went back into the studio with her veteran road band to record Silver Lining, released in 2002. Featuring Bonnie'sstunning interpretation of the David Gray-penned title track, the Grammy-nominated "Gnawin' On It," and the hit single "I Can't Help You Now,"Silver Lining was considered by many critics to be one of the best albums of her career. She promoted the album with a lengthy world tour that included her Green Highway Festival and an eco-partnership promoting BioDiesel fuel, the environment, and alternative energy solutions at shows and benefits along the way. In 2003, she released the retrospective The Best of Bonnie Raitt on Capitol. Raitt stayed busy with more guest appearances, including the stunning duet "Do I Ever Cross Your Mind" on Ray Charles' final release, Genius Loves Company, which won the Grammy award for Album of the Year, and a duet on the Grammy-winning album True Love by Toots & The Maytals. Her 1989 breakthrough album, Nick of Time, was remixed for surround sound, and released by Capitol Records in 2004 as a DVD-Audio, garnering a Grammy nomination in the newly created category, Best Surround Sound Album. In 2003, she also participated in Martin Scorsese's acclaimed PBS series, The Blues, performing two songs in Wim Wenders' film, The Soul of a Man, and joining the all-star cast of Lightning in a Bottle, the live feature concert film on the Blues directed by Antoine Fuqua. She also contributed songs for two Disney movies, The Country Bears and Home on the Range. She played guitar on a track on Stevie Wonder's album, A Time To Love, and appeared in the TV/DVD tribute, Music l0l: Al Green. Souls Alike, her first album ever to bear the credit "Produced by Bonnie Raitt." debuted at #19 on the Billboard 200 in September 2005, eliciting widespread critical acclaim and propelling Raitt back onto the road. She was also selected as the inaugural artist for the VH1 Classic Decades Rock Live! CD/DVD series. Bonnie Raitt and Friends Featuring Norah Jones, Ben Harper, Alison Krauss and Keb'Mo' was released in August of 2006. In the years in and around the release of Souls Alike, she co-headlined with Jackson Browne and Keb Mo' part of the historic "Vote For Change" tour leading up to the 2004 Presidential election, and then again for the 2008 election, staged a series of benefit concerts and fundraising receptions to help get out the vote and encourage voting in key Democratic Senate races. In 2007, Bonnie joined her MUSE (Musicians United for Safe Energy) friends Jackson Browne and Graham Nash to launch a campaign to prevent the legislative bailout of the nuclear industry and developed www.nukefree.org, a website that serves as an information and networking hub for safe energy activists. In August 2011, MUSE mounted a very successful benefit concert at Shoreline Amphitheatre to raise funds for Japan disaster relief (following the devastating earthquake, tsunami and meltdown of the Daichi-Fukushima nuclear reactors earlier in the year,) as well as non-nuclear organizations worldwide. Bonnie continues to use her influence to affect the way music is perceived and appreciated in the world. In 1988, she co-founded the Rhythm and Blues Foundation, which works to improve royalties, financial conditions, and recognition for a whole generation of R&B pioneers to whom she feels we owe so much. In 1995, she initiated the Bonnie Raitt Guitar Project with the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, currently running in 200 clubs around the world, to encourage underprivileged youth to play music as budgets for music instruction in the schools run dry. Bonnie currently sits on the Advisory or Honorary Boards of a number of organizations, including Little Kids Rock, Rainforest Action Network, Music Maker Relief Foundation and the Arhoolie Foundation. Her commitment to the redemptive power of music is expressed in the foreword she wrote to American Roots, the book based on 2001's PBS series of the same name. "I feel strongly that this appreciation needs to be out there so that black, Latino and all kids can understand the roots of their own musical heritage," she explains. "The consolidation of the music business has made it difficult to encourage styles like the blues, all of which deserve to be celebrated as part of our most treasured national resources." In the summer of 2009, Bonnie Raitt and Taj Mahal—two leading lights of modern blues—joined forces for their first-ever tour together. The "BonTaj Roulet" tour featured Bonnie and Taj on stage alone and together, before closing each night with a collaborative, blow-out Rhythm and Blues revue-style performance. In addition to the glorious sounds made from the stage, the BonTaj Tour also raised over $200,000 for charity. In an act of democracy dubbed the BonTaj Collective Action Fund, concertgoers voted amongst four cause areas and net proceeds were distributed in proportion to overall votes tallied. "The 'BonTaj' tour was a dream of mine to put together," she says. "I knew that those shows—culminating in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame show, which was a blast—would signal the beginning of a hiatus for me." Now, Raitt is re-energized and excited to strap her guitar back on and get to work. After spending her career split between Warner Bros and Capitol Records, she is venturing out on her own with a label called Redwing Records. (Slipstream will be distributed by RED in North America and Proper Records for Ex North America.) The album's title is very significant for Bonnie —Slipstream isn't just a beautiful sounding word, but an indication of her place in the music community. "I'm in the slipstream of all these styles of music," she says. "I'm so inspired and so proud to continue these traditions, whether it's reggae or soul or blues. I'm in the slipstream of those who came before me, and I'm leaving one for those behind me. I'm holding up the traditions of the music that I love."

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with DubTonic Kru

Aug 1

Aug 1

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $12-$15

Event Information

Old school blues improvisation, meets hard hitting lyrical prowess, in a rich imaginative blend of vocal clarity and complexity. She sings with a voice that belies the dimensions of her physical body, from a soul much older than its current vessel. Her philosophy is profoundly spiritual, and her style is Jazz on Dub.
“You don’t have to be an avid reggae listener to be enraptured by the hypnotic vocals of Jah9. Possessing a chilling yet bewitching vibrato evoking a young Ella Fitzgerald and a rootsy coolness à la Erykah Badu” – MTV Iggy


“Part poet and part protest singer, all wrapped up in one beautiful dub voice.” – Headphone Nation

"The Janelle Monae of Jamaica" – The Blank of Blank
"MTV predicts she may soon be due for a blow up" – Music.mic

Spool Mfg. Gallery - Johnson City, NY

Aug 8

Aug 8

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 21+ Only

Price: $20-$25

Event Information

The energy of rock n’ roll is impossible to categorize – mercurial, specific to its beholder and profoundly reflective. From the Binghamton, New York music scene comes Driftwood, a band with a rock n’ roll soul and a folk art mind. Carving out a name for themselves with electrifying live performances, they bring one of the most unique, raw sounds to the Americana/roots music scene. Incorporating upright bass, banjo, acoustic guitar and violin, the ghost of traditional American folk music lives in their palette. But the melodies, the harmonies and the lyrics are something else entirely. “We started off playing rock in high school. Then studying jazz and classical music in college. Then we dove headfirst into folk and bluegrass. At some point I guess we kind of met in the middle”, says guitarist/songwriter Dan Forsyth. Drawing on aspects of everything from 0ld-time recordings to 1960’s R&B, the music is crafted to serve the songs. With fast-growing audiences singing along at live shows, it’s easy to tell the primary focus is on song. “We recognized early on that one of our strongest points was songwriting. The greatest songs transcend genre and time and this was one of the motivating ideas behind the band at the start”, says banjo player/songwriter Joe Kollar. Trading lead vocals between Forsyth, Kollar and violinist Claire Byrne, the group’s stage dynamics are as captivating as the songs. “I give so much of myself when I play because I deem it necessary in order to do the music justice”, says Byrne, whose violin-shredding performances galvanize fans. Songs or shredding, “There’s a reason people won’t let them off the stage”, says Jess Novak from The Syracuse New Times. Coming from a town not often recognized for music but predominantly for industry, being the home of Twilight Zone author Rod Serling and donning the title of the “Carousel Capital of the World”, it’s easy to wonder how this not-so-traditional string band came out of the Binghamton music scene. “What people don’t often realize is that bands like Old Crow Medicine Show, The Horseflies and The Highwoods String Band came out of this same area and had a huge influence on us”, says Forsyth. “We played a lot of old-time in the beginning and it was a huge part of our band learning to play music together”. Formed in 2005, the band spent four years playing just about anywhere they could. “We just wanted to be able to play for any crowd and turn heads”, says banjo player Joe Kollar. “We played everywhere. Coffee houses, bars, churches, rock clubs, Bluegrass festivals and the streets…a lot on the streets. We didn’t make any money, but what we learned was invaluable”. After the release of their Debut CD “Rally Day” in 2009, the band has spent most of the last 4 years on the road. With club and festival appearances alongside of artists such as Bela Fleck, Old Crow Medicine Show, Rusted Root, Del McCoury, Brett Dennen, The Wailers, Railroad Earth, Robert Randolph, Rubblebucket, Leon Russell, Emmylou Harris and Donna the Buffalo, Driftwood is making serious waves on the East Coast scene. In the last three years they’ve played over 475 shows. With the release of their second CD “A Rock & Roll Heart” in 2011, the band landed spins on a slew of great radio shows and stations such as WFUV’s Sunday Breakfast with John Platt (New York, NY); KZSU (Stanford, CA), WCBE (Columbus, OH), WNRN (Charlottesville, VA), WUNC (Chapel Hill), NC and WDVX (Knoxville, TN). In November 2012, Driftwood started work on their third and latest CD. Despite a grueling tour schedule and very little time at home, the recordings were finished in the summer of 2013. The self-titled new disc was recorded in a church outside of Ithaca, NY with Grammy-winning engineer Robby Hunter. It is set to be released on December 3rd, 2013.

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

Aug 13

Aug 13

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

The Reflection is the first new studio album by Keb Mo since Suitcase in 2006. These twelve songs are the product of an important period of personal and professional growth for the artist formerly known as Kevin Moore. In that time, he started a new family; moved from Los Angeles to Nashville; built a state–of–the–art home studio, and founded his own label, Yolabelle International, distributed by Ryko and the Warner Music Group. Keb Mo is a three–time Grammy Award winner for Best Contemporary Blues Album; and a key figure in the acclaimed 2003 PBS series Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues. But The Reflection is not, in essence, a blues album. In sound and spirit, it’s closer to the work of African–American "folk soul" singer/songwriters like Bill Withers, Bobby Womack, and Terry Callier. Indeed, tracks like "My Shadow" and "Crush On You" would have fit neatly into Urban radio’s "Quiet Storm" format at almost any time in the past 25 years. The Reflection brings together all of this singular artist's diverse influences – pre–disco R&B, American folk and gospel, rock, blues, and more – in a sound that is truly and uniquely his own. "I worked on this record for the better part of two years," says Keb. "It took me some time as this was an educational process for me and my engineer John Schirmer. I didn’t want to let it go until I had something that I was proud to share with the public. It’s the culmination of all of my influences throughout my career." Through all the changes of the past several years, Keb Mo found time to play a couple of hundred shows on several continents. He composed and recorded music for the acclaimed TNT series "Memphis Beat," starring Jason Lee and Alfre Woodward. And he wrote some of the best songs of his career for The Reflection – material strong enough to attract such notable guests as country music superstar Vince Gill ("My Baby’s Tellin’ Lies"), nouveau–soul chanteuse India.Arie ("Crush On You"), saxophonist Dave Koz ("One Of These Nights"), and veteran session guitarist David T. Walker ("All The Way," "The Reflection," "The Whole Enchilada"). AWARDS GRAMMY AWARD Contemporary Blues Album "Keep It Simple" 2005 GRAMMY AWARD Contemporary Blues Album "Slow Down" 1999 GRAMMY AWARD Contemporary Blues Album "Just Like You" 1997 GRAMMY AWARD NOMINATION Blues Album of the Year "The Reflection" 2011 GRAMMY AWARD NOMINATION Contemporary Blues Album of the Year "Suitcase" 2007 GRAMMY AWARD NOMINATION Contemporary Blues Album of the Year "Big Wide Grin" 2002 GRAMMY AWARD NOMINATION Contemporary Blues Album of the Year "The Door" 2001 GRAMMY AWARD NOMINATION Country Song of the Year "I Hope" 2006 GOLD RECORD certified by RIAA for "Keb' Mo'" 2005 2002 ORVILLE GIBSON AWARDS- Best Blues Guitarist 2008 ELEVATE FILM FESTIVAL- Best Music Artist 2008 ELEVATE FILM FESTIVAL- Best Music Video HOLLYWOOD ROCK WALK INDUCTION - June 16, 2007 WC HANDY Blues Awards: 1999 Song of the Year - Soon As I Get Paid 1994 Country/Acoustic Blues Album of the Year - Keb' Mo' album 1999 & 2000 Contemporary Blues Male Artist of the Year 1997-2002 Acoustic Blues Artist of the Year

CRAQ Barn: Carman Road Artist Quarters - Trumansburg, NY

Aug 15

Aug 15

Doors open at 1:00 pm Starts at 2:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $20-$30

Event Information

Big Mean Sound Machine is proud to present the inaugural BBQ at CRAQ: Carman Road Artist Quarters Saturday August 15th!! Featuring a diverse lineup full of amazing regional acts situated on a beautiful property in the middle of Upstate New York The BBQ promises to be the hang of the summer!


Scheduled to perform:
Big Mean Sound Machine
Sophistafunk
Thunder Body
Club Rub-A-Dub
DJ Gourd
DJ Solid Gould
More bands TBA!


More info coming soon!!


Age policy: 18+ with ID / under 18 with a parent or guardian. Children 12 years and under admitted free!

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with The Front Bottoms and Kevin Devine and the Goddamn Band

Aug 15

Aug 15

Doors open at 5:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $37.50-$42

Event Information

Although the members of Brand New cut their teeth in various hardcore bands, the group took a more melodic approach to its own work, embracing punk-pop on the debut album Your Favorite Weapon and incorporating aspects of indie rock during future projects. Formed in Long Island, NY, the band took shape in 2000 around the talents of drummer Brian Lane, vocalist/guitarist Jesse Lacey, bassist Garrett Tierney, and guitarist Vin Accardi. Brand New wasted little time attracting local attention with a self-released demo, and shows alongside Midtown and Glassjaw helped spread the band's buzz outside of New York. In 2001, the musicians issued their first record, Your Favorite Weapon, which featured production from friend Mike Sapone. Lacey's clever and cutting lyrics sprinkled the album, which produced the semi-hit "Jude Law and a Semester Abroad," and more touring with the likes of Taking Back Sunday and Finch followed.
Deja Entendu Proving to be more than just another punk-pop outfit, the group made something of a stylistic leap with Deja Entendu, a decidedly matured follow-up that was recorded with Steve Haigler (Pixies, Blake Babies) and released in summer 2003 to warm reviews. Music videos for "The Quiet Things That No One Ever Knows" and "Sic Transit Gloria...Glory Fades" found significant airplay on MTV, and Brand New graduated to larger venues by playing with New Found Glory, Good Charlotte, Dashboard Confessional, and blink-182. By that fall, as the band's underground following continued growing into a mainstream audience, Brand New inked a deal with Dreamworks, which later led to a partnership with Interscope following the former label's buyout.
The Devil and God Are Raging Inside Me Touring eventually slowed to a halt as Brand New holed themselves up to work on their third album and major-label debut. After an extended quiet spell -- little to no interviews or updates came from the band's camp for quite some time -- Brand New finally emerged in summer 2006 for several headlining dates in America, their first nationwide tour in three years. The highly anticipated The Devil and God Are Raging Inside Me appeared in November 2006. Though significantly darker and less immediate than past efforts, the album was commended for its depth and maturity, and the band supported it with a sold-out spring 2007 tour. Meanwhile, sales for Deja Entendu continued to trickle in, and the album went gold that May. Brand New set to work on another album one year later, once again working with producer Mike Sapone on the new material. The resulting record, Daisy, was issued in 2009, and the band took a different approach by focusing nearly all of its promotional abilities on European audiences instead of American fans. A Deluxe version of Your Favorite Weapon was released in 2011.

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Manchester Orchestra and also Kevin Devine and the Goddamn Band

Show SOLD OUT! Camping Upgrades are still available.

Aug 16

Aug 16

Doors open at 5:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $15-$37.50

Event Information

Although the members of Brand New cut their teeth in various hardcore bands, the group took a more melodic approach to its own work, embracing punk-pop on the debut album Your Favorite Weapon and incorporating aspects of indie rock during future projects. Formed in Long Island, NY, the band took shape in 2000 around the talents of drummer Brian Lane, vocalist/guitarist Jesse Lacey, bassist Garrett Tierney, and guitarist Vin Accardi. Brand New wasted little time attracting local attention with a self-released demo, and shows alongside Midtown and Glassjaw helped spread the band's buzz outside of New York. In 2001, the musicians issued their first record, Your Favorite Weapon, which featured production from friend Mike Sapone. Lacey's clever and cutting lyrics sprinkled the album, which produced the semi-hit "Jude Law and a Semester Abroad," and more touring with the likes of Taking Back Sunday and Finch followed. Deja Entendu Proving to be more than just another punk-pop outfit, the group made something of a stylistic leap with Deja Entendu, a decidedly matured follow-up that was recorded with Steve Haigler (Pixies, Blake Babies) and released in summer 2003 to warm reviews. Music videos for "The Quiet Things That No One Ever Knows" and "Sic Transit Gloria...Glory Fades" found significant airplay on MTV, and Brand New graduated to larger venues by playing with New Found Glory, Good Charlotte, Dashboard Confessional, and blink-182. By that fall, as the band's underground following continued growing into a mainstream audience, Brand New inked a deal with Dreamworks, which later led to a partnership with Interscope following the former label's buyout. The Devil and God Are Raging Inside Me Touring eventually slowed to a halt as Brand New holed themselves up to work on their third album and major-label debut. After an extended quiet spell -- little to no interviews or updates came from the band's camp for quite some time -- Brand New finally emerged in summer 2006 for several headlining dates in America, their first nationwide tour in three years. The highly anticipated The Devil and God Are Raging Inside Me appeared in November 2006. Though significantly darker and less immediate than past efforts, the album was commended for its depth and maturity, and the band supported it with a sold-out spring 2007 tour. Meanwhile, sales for Deja Entendu continued to trickle in, and the album went gold that May. Brand New set to work on another album one year later, once again working with producer Mike Sapone on the new material. The resulting record, Daisy, was issued in 2009, and the band took a different approach by focusing nearly all of its promotional abilities on European audiences instead of American fans. A Deluxe version of Your Favorite Weapon was released in 2011.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Aug 20

Aug 20

Doors open at 9:00 pm Starts at 10:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $10-$13

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Declared “Heir to the (Phish) Throne” by JamBands.com in 2013 – The Jauntee has quickly made a name for themselves in the New England music scene. Hailing from Boston, they’ve solidified a dedicated following in the Northeast, playing most staple venues in the area (ie. Paradise Rock Club, Nectar’s, The Spot Underground, Stone Church). Several New England festival appearances (ie. StrangeCreek, Camp Coldbrook, Disc Jam) and extensive touring down the East Coast and across the Midwest have given them Nationwide recognition, with sold out shows as far west as Denver, CO (Quixote’s). A focus on live improvisation, set list variety, and musical exploration makes every show different from the last, truly making The Jauntee a live act to see again and again. Drawing influence from a wide variety of bands, The Jauntee’s improvisational landscape spans multiple genres, including: Funk/Rock/Jazz/Progressive/Bluegrass/Psychedelic and Ambient music. Their willingness to explore genres, abandon all song structure, and dive into ‘the weird’ sets them apart from your average upcoming Jam Band. They aim to push the boundaries of improvisation, embrace the moment and engage the audience. With an ever-expanding song catalog and an inclination for open ended improvisation, every show promises to be a unique experience.

The Smith Opera House - Geneva , NY

Aug 21

Aug 21

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Legendary singer-songwriter GRAHAM NASH is a two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee-with Crosby, Stills, and Nash and with the Hollies. He was also inducted into the Songwriter's Hall of Fame twice, as a solo artist and with CSN, and he is a GRAMMY Award winner.

Nash’s passionate voice continues to be heard in support of peace, and social and environmental justice. The No Nukes/Musicians United for Safe Energy (MUSE) concerts he organized with Jackson Browne and Bonnie Raitt in 1979 remain seminal benefit events. In 2011, Nash was instrumental in bringing MUSE back to the forefront with a concert to benefit Japan disaster relief and groups promoting non-nuclear energy worldwide.

Graham Nash

In September 2013, Nash released his long-awaited autobiography Wild Tales, which delivers an engrossing, no-holds-barred look back at his remarkable career and the music that defined a generation. The book landed him on the New York Times Best Sellers list, and will be released in paperback format this fall.

In recognition for his contributions as a musician and philanthropist, Nash was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) by Queen Elizabeth. While continually building his musical legacy, Nash is also an internationally renowned photographer and visual artist. With his photography, Nash has drawn honors including the New York Institute of Technology’s Arts & Technology Medal and Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters and the Hollywood Film Festival’s inaugural Hollywood Visionary Cyber Award. His work is collected in the book Eye to Eye: Photographs by Graham Nash; he curated others’ work in the volume Taking Aim: Unforgettable Rock ‘n’ Roll Photographs Selected by Graham Nash (2009).

Nash’s work has been shown in galleries and museums worldwide. His company Nash Editions’ original IRIS 3047 digital printer and one of its first published works—Nash’s 1969 portrait of David Crosby— is now housed in the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian Institution in recognition of his revolutionary accomplishments in the fine arts and digital printing world.

He is currently working on a new studio record.

Academy of Music - Northampton, MA

Sep 7

Sep 7

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Grammy-nominated harmony duo The Milk Carton Kids have announced the May 19, 2015 release of their third album, Monterey. A refreshing alternative to the foot-stomping grandeur of the so-called “folk revival,” an understated virtuosity defines The Milk Carton Kids and their new album. The two years since the release of their last album, The Ash & Clay, have been significant ones for the group. In addition to a Grammy nomination for Best Folk Album, The Milk Carton Kids won Duo/Group of the Year at the Americana Music Awards in 2014. Their featured performances and interviews in T Bone Burnett & the Coen Brothers' concert documentary, "Another Day/Another Time,” brought the band its widest audience and their 55-city North American tour last year sold out months in advance. Cultural purveyors from Garrison Keillor to T Bone Burnett to Billy Bragg have hailed the duo’s importance among a group of new folk bands, both expanding and contradicting the rich tradition that precedes them. Yet while some of the band’s many accolades reference a specific genre, the duo quickly transcends those tags with clear inflections of jazz, classical, even the dark lyricism of modern “alternative." This past year, The Milk Carton Kids were asked to pay tribute to Johnny Cash and Emmylou Harris — Cash on the Joe Henry-produced remake of “Bitter Tears,” and Harris with their standing ovation performance at the tribute concert “The Life & Songs of Emmylou Harris,” among luminaries including Kris Kristofferson, Mavis Staples, Alison Kraus, Iron & Wine, and Harris herself. If Cash and Harris taught us that American music is meant to be taken at its expansive word, without confines or borders, The Milk Carton Kids appear to have taken the lesson to heart.

Sep 10

Sep 10

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $20-$25

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The Randy and Lahey show is a silly, sexist, drunken hour and a half of songs and skits, audience participation, profanity, Shakespeare, and general hilarity. Over the past eight years it has developed into the fastest moving two man show in the known universe. From Newfoundland to Vancouver Island several hundred thousand people have thrilled to Randy and Lahey's shennanigins. It's a constantly moving showcase of two television icons who pull no punches when battering the audience with "Batman and Robin" or "The Shit Rap." The innocent honesty of an out- of-control drunken ex-cop Trailer Park Supervisor and his side-kick Randybobandy the cheeseburger eating ex male prostitute, weekend Trailer Park Supervisor is pants pissing humour at its warmest. The show itself is roughly based on the T.V. series and movies, but being live, necessitates a different format and different is the operative word here. There is nothing like it anywhere. Shit talk and poetry; sodomy and sweet talk all thrown together with music and mayhem. What more could a room full of fun seekers want.

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

Sep 11

Sep 11

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $20-$25

Event Information

This is a general admission seated event


Formed in Sleepy Hollow, New York over a decade ago, The Slambovian Circus of Dreams (AKA The Grand Slambovians) pioneered the alt-folk/americana genre, staying on the fringes of the music industry and under the radar while producing several critically acclaimed studio albums. 'A Box of Everything' the band's next release (due out April 1st, 2014) is a compilation of the 'Greatest Hits' you've never heard from this reclusive band. Their melodic avant-folk conjures a quirkier Tom Petty or fuller Buffalo Tom with an exotic instrumental arsenal. If you like Dylan, Bowie, The Decemberists, you'll find a lot to love about this band which features an otherworldly slide mandolin, accordion, cello and styles ranging from dusty Americana ballads to Pink Floydesque cinematic anthems. Headlining major music festivals and venues across the US, Canada and UK, they built their career from the ground up with a loyal fan base supporting them all the way. Fronted by songwriter Joziah Longo (vocals/guitar/harmonica) whose voice is "Soothing and bewitching as a snake oil tonic" says The Big Issue, UK and goes on to say "the entire root system of Rock Family Trees is embedded in his voice". The band features guitarist/mandolin player Sharkey McEwen (think lovechild of David Gilmour and Duane Allman); multi-instrumentalist Tink Lloyd (accordion, cello, uke, theremin, melodica); and Eric Puente (Percussion).

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

Sep 14

Sep 14

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Hailing from Athens, GA., of Montreal have carved their own niche -- establishing themselves as a band that thrills fans with compelling live performances, delights critics with their constant innovations, and continually showcases their musical evolution by drawing from a different set of influences for each album.

Primary songwriter Kevin Barnes pours emotion -- heartbreak, frustration, elation, whimsy -- into lyrics that shift from adopted personas to invented alter egos to unobstructed views directly into his psyche.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Surface To Air Missive

Sep 15

Sep 15

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $20-$25

Event Information

Hailing from Athens, GA., of Montreal have carved their own niche -- establishing themselves as a band that thrills fans with compelling live performances, delights critics with their constant innovations, and continually showcases their musical evolution by drawing from a different set of influences for each album.

Primary songwriter Kevin Barnes pours emotion -- heartbreak, frustration, elation, whimsy -- into lyrics that shift from adopted personas to invented alter egos to unobstructed views directly into his psyche.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Sep 17

Sep 17

Doors open at 7:30 pm Starts at 8:30 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $20

Event Information

Desaparecidos is a rock band featuring Conor Oberst (vocals,guitar) Landon Hedges (bass guitar, vocals), Matt Baum (drums), Denver Dalley – (guitar) and Ian McElroy (keyboards). The band formed in 2001, released one album (2002’s Read Music/Speak Spanish), and broke up shortly thereafter. In 2010, Desaparecidos reunited to play The Concert for Equality in Omaha.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Mrs Skannatto

Sep 19

Sep 19

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $15

Event Information

Age policy: 18+ with ID / under 18 with a parent or guardian


Pilfers are a legendary band out of New York City that play an infectious, unique sound that blends pop, reggae, hardcore, dub, punk, and ska. Their sound, dubbed “raggacore” features the talents of lead vocalist Coolie Ranx, guitarist/vocalist Nick Bacon, drummer James Blanck, bassist Ben Basile, and trombonist/keyboardist Billy Kottage. Pilfers are well known and loved for their intense live performances that encourage constant crowd participation. Followers of Pilfers have been affectionately named “Pilfers Crew.” Formed in 1997, Pilfers has toured internationally with the likes of Bad Brains, Zebrahead, Reel Big Fish, the Specials, Madness, the Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Amazing Royal Crowns, Mustard Plug, and Goldfinger. Pilfers released two albums including a self-titled full-length and Chawalaleng (Mojo Records). In the summer of 2001, the band broke up over various differences. Since 2005, the original line up has come together for several sold out reunion shows along the East Coast for their devoted fans. In 2013, Pilfers hit the road with Reel Big Fish making new fans across the U.S. and Canada. The strong demand for more from their Pilfers Crew and their love for playing intense live shows has them hitting the road more frequently. Pilfers are currently recording new songs for an upcoming full-length album.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

with William Tyler

Sep 23

Sep 23

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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Wilco is a Chicago sextet formed by singer-songwriter and guitarist Jeff Tweedy in the mid-1990s. The band’s current lineup solidified in 2004 when guitarist Nels Cline and guitarist/keyboardist Patrick Sansone joined Tweedy, founding bassist John Stirratt, drummer Glenn Kotche and keyboardist Mikael Jorgensen. Wilco’s brand of classic roots rock incorporates folk, pop and genre-spanning experimentalism. The band’s 10-album catalog includes 2002’s Yankee Hotel Foxtrot (named one of the 500 greatest albums of all time by Rolling Stone), 2005’s Grammy award-winning A Ghost is Born, the Grammy-nominated Wilco (The Album) and The Whole Love and more. NPR has called Wilco “the best rock band in America” and the band has been heralded by the Los Angeles Times as “an amazing machine whose six players seem more at one with their music than any rock group working today.” The Wilco catalog includes Mermaid Avenue Volumes 1, 2 and 3, which, in collaboration with British folk singer Billy Bragg, sets original music to song lyrics by the iconic Woody Guthrie.

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

Sep 24

Sep 24

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

From their days playing together as teenagers to their current acoustic and electric blues, probably no one has more consistently led American music for the last 50 years — yes! — than Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady, the founders and continuing core members of Hot Tuna.
The pair began playing together while growing up in the Washington D.C. area, where Jack’s father was a dentist and Jorma’s father a State Department official. Four years younger, Jack continued in junior high, then high school — while playing professional gigs as lead guitarist at night before he was old enough to drive — while Jorma (who had played rhythm guitar to Jack’s lead) started college in Ohio, accompanied his family overseas, then returned to college, this time in California.
Along the way, Jorma became enamored of, then committed to, the finger-picking guitar style exemplified by the now-legendary Rev. Gary Davis. Jack, meanwhile, had taken an interest in the electric bass, at the time a controversial instrument in blues, jazz, and folk circles.
In the mid 1960s, Jorma was asked to audition to play guitar for a new band that was forming in San Francisco. Though an acoustic player at heart, he grew interested in the electronic gadgetry that was beginning to make an appearance in the popular music scene — particularly in a primitive processor brought to the audition by a fellow named Ken Kesey — and decided to join that band; soon thereafter he summoned his young friend from Washington, who now played the bass.
Thus was created the unique (then and now) sound that was The Jefferson Airplane. Jorma even contributed the band’s name, drawn from a nickname a friend had for the blues-playing Jorma. Jack’s experience as a lead guitarist led to a style of bass playing which took the instrument far beyond its traditional role.
While in The Jefferson Airplane, putting together the soundtrack of the 60s, the pair remained loyal to the blues, jazz, bluegrass, and folk influences of the small clubs and larger venues they had learned from years before. While in San Francisco and even in hotel rooms on the road, they would play together and worked up a set of songs that they would often play at clubs in the Bay Area and while on the road, often after having played a set with the Airplane. This led to a record contract; in fact, they had an album recorded before they decided to name their band Hot Tuna. With it they launched on an odyssey which has itself continued for more than 35 years, always finding new and interesting turns in its path forward.
The first thing an early Hot Tuna fans discovered at their concerts of the early 1970s was that the band was growing louder and louder. In an era in which volume often overtrumped musicianship, Hot Tuna provided both. The second thing a fan would discover was that Jack and Jorma really loved to play. “Look around for another band that plays uninterrupted three- to six-hour sets,” wrote reviewer Jerry Moore. What Moore could not have known was that had there been no audience at all, they would have played just as long and just as well, so devoted were they to making music. Of course, the audience wasn’t superfluous by any means; it energized and continues to energize their performances. Album followed album — more than two dozen in all, not counting solo efforts, side projects, and appearances on the albums of other bands and performers — and they continued to develop their interests and styles, both together and in individual pursuits. In an era in which old bands reunite for one last tour, Hot Tuna can’t because Hot Tuna never broke up.
Along the way, they have been joined by a succession of talented musicians: Drummers, harmonica players, keyboardists, backup singers, violinists, mandolinists, and more, all fitting in to Jorma and Jack’s current place in the musical spectrum. And along the way there was no list of outstanding guitarists that didn’t include Jorma, nor was there anyone who seriously thought there is a better bass player than Jack.
After two decades of acoustic and electric concerts and albums, the 1990s brought a new focus on acoustic music to Hot Tuna. More intimate venues with a more individual connection to the audience became increasingly frequent stops. Soon, the loud electric sound (and the semi trailer load of equipment) disappeared entirely from Hot Tuna tours. Maturity brought the desire to do things not instead of but in addition to being a touring band. Both had become interested in teaching, passing along what they had learned and what they had uniquely developed to a new generation of players.
In 1998 Jorma and his wife Vanessa opened Fur Peace Ranch Guitar Camp, in the beautiful rolling Appalachian foothills of southeastern Ohio.
Here, on a sprawling and rustic yet modern campus, musicians and would-be musicians come for intensive and enjoyable workshops taught by Jorma, Jack, and other extraordinary players, learning things that range from different styles of playing to songwriting and even storytelling (the musician in performance has to say something while changing that broken string!), to making a song one’s own.
In addition, there is now BreakDownWay.com, a unique interactive teaching site that comes closest of anything yet to make individual instruction available to students anywhere there is a computer and an Internet connection.
But the teaching doesn’t replace Hot Tuna’s busy tour schedule; it’s in addition to the tours. Nor have they lighened up their individual schedules. Jack released his first solo CD, Dream Factor, on Eagle Records in 2003. He has a busy and elaborate website at jackcasady.com. Jorma has a website, too, and achieved enormous critical acclaim and a Grammy nomination for his 2003 solo album, Blue Country Heart. (Both are in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame due to their pioneering work in The Jefferson Airplane.) As 2006 began, they launched another exciting website, Hot Tuna Tunes, where fans may inexpensively download professionally made recordings of full Hot Tuna concerts in both MP3 and lossless encodings, suitable for portable player and home-burned CDs respectively. Hot Tuna Tunes is added to all the time, so it’s almost as if Hot Tuna were releasing numerous live concert albums every year. Collect the entire set!
For the last few years, Jorma and Jack have been joined in most of their Hot Tuna performances by the mandolin virtuoso Barry Mitterhoff. A veteran of bluegrass, Celtic, folk, and rock-influenced bands including “Tony Trischka and Skyline” and “Bottle Hill,” Barry has found a new voice in working with Hot Tuna, and the fit has been good — watching them play, it’s as if he’s been there from the beginning and they’re all having the time of their lives.
Jorma and Jack certainly could not have imagined, let alone predicted, where playing would take them. It’s been a long and fascinating road to numerous exciting destinations. Two things have never changed: They still love to play as much as they did as kids in Washington D.C., and there are still many, many exciting miles yet to travel on their musical odyssey.

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

General Admission Seated Event

Sep 26

Sep 26

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $25-$30

Event Information

PLEASE NOTE THIS IS A GENERAL ADMISSION SEATED EVENT


Honing a synthesis of folk and blues for 50 years, Chris Smither is truly an American original. His new CD, Still On the Levee, is a career-spanning retrospective double CD. Recorded in New Orleans with studio-mates, The Motivators, Still On the Levee plays host to special guests including Allen Toussaint and Loudon Wainwright III. The record highlights the vast catalog of an American music master. Reviewers and fans from around the world agree that Chris is a profound songwriter, a blistering guitarist and, as he puts it, a 'one-man band to the bone!’ Chris melds the guitar styles of his two major influences, Lightnin' Hopkins and Mississippi John Hurt, into his own signature sound. His music continues to draw deeply from the blues, American folk music, modern poets and humanist philosophers. 'Link Of Chain', a tribute album of Chris Smither originals with stellar versions by Dave Alvin, Tim O'Brien, Bonnie Raitt, Josh Ritter, Loudon Wainwright III, Jorma Kaukonen, Eilen Jewell and others is now available from Signature Sounds.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Sep 26

Sep 26

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

When country a cappella band Home Free was crowned Season 4 Champions of NBC's The Sing-Off this past December, their victory was by no means the beginnings of a career for the five country stars from Minnesota… rather it was a satisfying culmination of nearly a decade of hard work and commitment to a vocal craft growing in popularity. Founded by brothers Chris and Adam Rupp during their college years in the early 2000s, Home Free had been perfecting their live show for years prior to The Sing-Off--performing together for crowds in countless State and County Fairs, on college campuses, in Fortune 500 companies, and in theaters all across the country. It was their experience on the road that carried them to a Sing-Off victory, swelling their fan base and bringing their homegrown country style into a national spotlight. Home Free continues to entertain audiences with their high-energy show peppered with quick-witted humor that meshes Nashville standards with pop hits dipped in country flavor. This spring they continue their journey as they take part in the 32-city, 36-show Sing-Off Tour Live! on the heels of their Columbia Records debut release, Crazy Life, in stores now.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Sep 26

Sep 26

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $12-$15

Event Information

Whether they're tearing it up in a basement, rocking a festival crowd or hard at work in a studio, The Districts are a band that exists in the moment. The Pennsylvania four-piece channels its long-forged bonds into visceral, explosive rock and roll. You'll hear hints of Americana, moments of the blues and folk, but written into songs so expressive that those labels are transcended. Their second LP, "A Flourish and a Spoil," is out on Fat Possum Records in February of 2015. Founding members Rob Grote (guitar, vocals) Connor Jacobus (bass) and Braden Lawrence (drums) have been friends since childhood and formed The Districts in high school. You can hear that closeness in their effortless chemistry onstage and off, the way their songs build and grow, the way instrumental bits intertwine and the compelling command they have of whatever square footage they occupy behind microphones and a PA. The band self-recorded and self-released its "Kitchen Songs" EP in 2012, followed that summer by their full-length debut "Telephone" (also a self-release, and all the more impressive for it). By their senior year, the band had already begun to make inroads beyond their small Lancaster County hometown of Lititz, and were performing on the regular in Philadelphia, Delaware and New York ("4th and Roebling" from "Flourish" is named after the intersection in Brooklyn where they parked their car for their first New York gig at the now-defunct Big Snow Buffalo Lounge). In 2013, they were being played in regular rotation at WXPN in Philadelphia and were a featured performer at the station's XPoNential Music Festival. That fall they signed to Fat Possum, which released their self-titled EP in January of 2014; the five-song 10" contained two new songs -- "Rocking Chair" and "Lyla" -- along with three tracks from their self-releases. With the momentum behind the EP and their buzzed-about live show, The Districts had a tremendous showing in Austin for SXSW 2014, named "the band who owned SXSW" by the NME. They've since taken the show to Lollapalooza, Austin City Limits, Reading / Leeds, Outside Lands, Haldern Pop Festival and many more fests in the U.S. and Europe. That's not to say the band hasn't experienced its share of setbacks. In early summer of 2014, its van was broken into during a tour stop in St. Louis and all of its gear was stolen. Shortly after, founding guitarist Mark Larson left the band to pursue college, performing as a District for the last time at the 2014 XPoNential Music Festival (where they shared the stage with Band of Horses and Beck). But the band persevered, recruiting new guitarist Pat Cassidy and recording their second full length with producer John Congleton in the fall. "A Flourish and a Spoil" is built about those ideas of transition. As Rob puts it, it's a record about "change and loss, the fact that everything sours in time, but also the beauty that can be found in that." It's reflected in the cover art the band made in collaboration with photographer Joanna Ference: a halved grapefruit, dried and decaying, but still attached to a bright green stem. Sonically, "Flourish" is a vibrant, eclectic rock record, collecting sounds from toe-tapping fuzz-pop ("Peaches") to contemplative folk ("Suburban Smell") and driving, impressionistic soundscapes ("Young Blood" is well worth 9 minutes of your time) into a whirlwind 45 minute set. The Districts credit John Congleton with shaping their sound on this outing. While the band is used to writing and producing on its own, Congleton "gave us an objective ear that helped us find and refine what we were trying to accomplish with this album." Rob recalls that, toward the end of the recording process, he had a song stuck in his head: the old Doris Day tune "A Bushel and a Peck," which his mother used to sing to him as a childhood lullaby. "The title was born from that," he says. "'A Flourish and a Spoil' is our attempt to reconcile lullabies with reality." It also announces the arrival of The Districts as a captivating voice in contemporary rock: a young band crafting heartfelt music that's honest, raw, energetic and unforgettable.

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

Oct 2

Oct 2

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

“At the top of her game…” (San Francisco Chronicle)


“Never been funnier…” (Boston Globe)


"Insightful, thought-provoking humor… (Chicago Tribune)


32 years ago Paula Poundstone climbed on a Greyhound bus and traveled across the country -- stopping in at open mic nights at comedy clubs as she went. A high school drop-out, she went on to become one of the great humorists of our time. You can hear her through your laughter as a regular panelist on NPR’s popular rascal of a weekly news quiz show, Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me. She tours regularly, performing standup comedy across the country, causing Bob Zany with the Boston Globe to write: “Poundstone can regale an audience for several hours with her distinctive brand of wry, intelligent and witty comedy.” Audience members may put it a little less elegantly: “I peed my pants.” While there is no doubt that Poundstone is funny, the thing that separates her from the pack of comics working today and that has made her a legend among comics and audiences alike is her ability to be spontaneous with a crowd. Poundstone says: “No two shows I do are the same. It's not that I don't repeat material. I do. My shows, when they're good, and I like to think they often are, are like a cocktail party. When you first get there, you talk about how badly you got lost and how hard it was to find parking. Then you tell a story about your kids or what you just saw on the news. You meet some new people and ask them about themselves. Then, someone says, "Tell that story you used to tell," and then someone on the other side of the room spills a drink, and you mock them. No one ever applauds me when I leave a party, though. I think they high five.” Paula's interchanges with the audience are never mean or done at a person’s expense. She even manages to handle politics without provoking the pall of disapproval less artful comics have received. Paula’s touring schedule is rigorous. She performs an average of 75 dates per year, mostly in Performing Arts Centers and Theatres. For those who don’t have a chance to see her live, they can listen to her brilliance on her CD’s or read her in print: Her newest comedy CD, I HEART JOKES: Paula Tells Them in Boston was recorded during a performance at the historic Wilbur Theatre in the heart of the city and released on April Fool’s Day 2013. It follows her first CD, I HEART JOKES: Paula Tells Them in Maine (November 2007), recorded at the world-famous Stone Mt. Arts Center in none-other than, Maine! Both are available for sale thru Paula’s website at www.paulapoundstone.com, on Amazon, CDbaby, Itunes, and if you are there, at Paula’s shows! Paula is also an accomplished writer. Her first hard cover book, There is Nothing In This Book That I Meant To Say, with a forward by Mary Tyler Moore, was published in 2006 by Harmony Books, a division of Random House. It is still in release on audio (Highbridge) and in paperback. Paula is hard at work on her second book, this one for Algonquin Press. Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me is now the most popular show on NPR, having reached #1 status in 2014. Listeners can test their knowledge against some of the best and brightest in the news and entertainment world while figuring out what's real news and what's made up. Paula quickly goes on record about how much she loves being part of the show saying: “I am a proud member of the endorphin production industry. They allow me to say whatever I want on Wait, Wait…Don't Tell Me. The panelists are unscripted, so it's perfect for me. I feel like I'm a batter in a batting cage. I get lobbed topics. Sometimes I just watch them go by, but every now and then I get a piece of one. If the others didn't cheat, it would be an almost perfect work experience.” The show is also heard internationally on NPR Worldwide and on the Internet via podcast. In May 2013 the show was Cinecast to movie theatres across the country.Paula was on the show, as was Steve Martin. Paula recently did commentary on CBS Sunday Morning. Her editorial pieces can be heard on NPR's All Things Considered. An avid reader, Paula signed on as the National Spokesperson for the American Library Association’s (ALA) United for Libraries in 2008 – a role she continues to this day! United for Libraries is a national citizen’s support group that works to raise funds and awareness for their local libraries. Said Paula, when she was chosen, “It’s funny that we think of libraries as quiet demure places where we are shushed by dusty, bun-balancing, bespectacled women. The truth is libraries are raucous clubhouses for free speech, controversy and community. Librarians have stood up to the Patriot Act, sat down with noisy toddlers and reached out to illiterate adults. Libraries can never be shushed.” As part of her duties, Paula recorded a public service announcement for United for Libraries and helps raise funds. For the last four years she has also been the headline panelist at the ALA’s annual conference for their “Laughs On Us” panel of writers. To quote Sally Reed, the ALA Nat'l Director: "...you'd have to come to one of these events to see how adored Paula is by librarians. We love her and it's never repetitive." Paula's incredible spontaneous humor is the perfect fit for the voracious appetite of the social networks: Follow her on: Twitter@twitter.com/paulapoundstone; Facebook: facebook.com/PaulaPoundstone. And enjoy her website: www.paulapoundstone.com Paula grew up in Sudbury, Massachusetts, and began performing at open-mic nights in 1979. Over the span of her career, she has amassed a list of awards and accolades that stretch the length of a great big tall guy’s arm. She not only shot through the glass ceiling, she never acknowledged it was there. She was never one to stereotype herself as a ‘female comedian’ or limit herself to comedy from a ‘female’ point of view. In the early 90’s she was the first woman to win the cable ACE for Best Standup Comedy Special and the first woman to be invited to perform standup at the prestigious White House Correspondents dinner where she joined the current President as part of the evening’s entertainment. Paula starred in a self-titled series for HBO in ’93 (for which she won her second Cable ACE Award for Best Program Interviewer) and moved the show to ABC which was short-lived, but applauded for its break from convention. Paula had her own comedy specials on HBO and BRAVO. In fact, she starred in several comedy specials on HBO, including “Paula Poundstone Goes to Harvard,” the only time the elite university has allowed their name to be used in the title of a television show. If it means anything to anyone, Paula is recognized as one of Comedy Central's 100 greatest stand-ups of all time. She won an American Comedy Award for Best Female Standup Comic, and in 2010 she was one of a select group voted into the Comedy Hall of Fame. Late-night America roared when Paula served as "official correspondent" for The Tonight Show during the 1992 Presidential race. This was followed by her extremely successful backstage commentary during the 1993 Emmy telecast. She has made numerous appearances on all the late night talk shows, including David Letterman, and a regular stint with Craig Ferguson. She has also appeared on The Today Show, Good Morning America, and guested several times on Garrison Keillor’s A Prairie Home Companion. In 2000, when a syndicated version of the popular game show To Tell The Truth came calling for Paula to be one of the panelists, she found another perfect showcase for her razor-sharp humor and spontaneous wit. Beginning in 1997, Paula voiced the character of Judge Stone on the acclaimed ABC-TV Saturday morning animated series Science Court (a.k.a. “Squigglevision”) for three years. In 1999 (the premiereseason) she added to her repertoire the voice of the Mom, ‘Paula’ in what is still considered a renownedcult show, Home Movies (UPN and The Cartoon Network). Paula guest starred on the CBS series Cybill, which led to a recurring role during the show’s final season, and also appeared on PBS favorites such as Sesame Street and Storytime. She won a local Emmy Award for her field pieces on the erudite “Life & Times” for PBS station KCET. She appeared on several network television specials including A Salute to The President from Fords Theatre on ABC when President Clinton was in office, and performed on every Comic Relief Special on HBO. These specials were heralded for the hundreds of thousands of dollars raised for the homeless and the lineup of stars. Paula has also enjoyed success as a Host of many events, including the Art Directors Guild Awards, an unprecedented 4 times, Logically Paula is almost always included in any compendium – be it film, television or print, noting comedic influences of the 20th/21st century. They include Why We Laugh Too: Women of Comedy (Lions Gate feature-length documentary, Showtime, 2013); We Killed: The Rise of Women in American Comedy (Sarah Crichton Books, 2012.) One of Paula’s quotes is even included in a new beautifully illustrated coffee table book on cats alongside quotes by notable authors and artists including W. H. Auden, Mark Twain, and Henry David Thoreau (Chronicle Books, 2015). Paula’s other writing credits include the back page column for Mother Jones from 1995-1998, the “Sunday Calendar” section for the Los Angeles Times, Entertainment Weekly, and Glamour magazine. In 2006 Paula authored a series of three math books with her high school Math teacher, Faye Ruopp: The Sticky Problem of Parallelogram Pancakes: And Other Skill-Building Math Activities, Grades 4-5; Venn Can We Be Friends?: And Other Skill-Building Math Activities, Grades 6-7; You Can't Keep Slope Down: And Other Skill-Building Math Activities, Grades 8-9. These are all available thru Amazon. Paula has three children, Toshia, Allison, and Thomas E. Poundstone. The family lives in Santa Monica, California.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Oct 2

Oct 2

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Chris Wood had a scrap of a song — seemed like a chorus — scribbled in a notebook. He played it for his older brother, Oliver, who’d had a verse lying around he didn’t know what to do with. The two pieces, composed months apart, one in urban Atlanta and the other deep in the Catskills, dovetailed musically and lyrically: the verse about a man regretting chasing unattainable women, the high-lonesome, harmony-driven refrain of “When I die, I wanna be sent back to try, try again.” “Neon Tombstone” wasn’t the first song that Chris, a founding member of jazz trio Medeski Martin & Wood, and Oliver, formerly Tinsley Ellis’s guitarist, had written — since 2006, they’d released three studio albums of Americana as The Wood Brothers. But it was the first one they’d written like this. “This is how a song is supposed to come together,” Oliver remembers thinking. “There was some chance, some randomness, to it.” The experience marked a deeper level of collaboration for The Wood Brothers, a newfound fraternal synchronicity that’s captured on their latest album, ‘The Muse.’ Within the first few bars of opener “Wastin’ My Mind,” which could pass for a lost cut from “The Last Waltz,” it’s clear the brothers are operating on a different plane than when we last heard them, on 2011’s ‘Smoke Ring Halo.’ The components are similar: the dialed-in vocal harmonies, Oliver’s gritty acoustic guitar, Chris’s virtuosic upright bass, the warrior poet lyrics. But here there’s a glue — a yellowy carpenter’s glue, one imagines — holding it all together. The cohesion comes from the brothers having spent the last two years on the road with new full-time member Jano Rix, a drummer and ace-in-the-hole multi-instrumentalist, whereas they relied on session musician-friends to fill out previous albums. Jano’s additional harmonies give credence to the old trope that while two family members often harmonize preternaturally, it takes a third, non-related singer for the sound to really shine. And then there’s Jano’s work on his literally patented percussion instrument, the “shuitar,” a shitty acoustic guitar rigged up with tuna cans and other noisemakers, which, in his hands, becomes a veritable drum kit. Starting with debut ‘Ways Not To Lose,’ which NPR described as a collection of “gracious little songs [that] sound like they were born on a front porch during a beautiful sunset,” The Wood Brothers have made albums like you’re not supposed to anymore — recording mostly live, warts and all. But on ‘The Muse,’ they double down on the production values of a purer time. Whereas ‘Smoke Ring Halo’ was tracked with the musicians playing in separate rooms, here Chris, Oliver and Jano often circled around a tree of microphones, a couple feet apart from one another, and simply played the songs, with even the lead vocals being recorded on the spot. The arrangement is a producer’s nightmare — the different sounds bleed into the various mics, limiting mixing options and ruling out the possibility of fixing mistakes — but the band had two willing accomplices: legendary country musician Buddy Miller, who produced the album, and Nashville studio vet Mike Poole, who engineered. “I just love how Mike and Buddy really embraced that idea,” Oliver says. Miller, an award-winning producer, guitarist and solo artist, has performed and recorded with icons such as Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Lucinda Williams, Robert Plant and Alison Krauss. Oliver continues, “I hear little things that are out of tune or imperfect, and I love it. That’s what I like about old recordings – they just did it, and that’s what happened.” From early in their childhood in Boulder, CO., Chris and Oliver were steeped in American roots music. Their father, a molecular biologist, would perform classic songs at campfires and family gatherings, while their mother, a poet, instilled a passion for storytelling and turn of phrase. The brothers bonded over bluesmen like Jimmy Reed and Lightnin’ Hopkins, but their paths, musical and otherwise, would diverge. Oliver moved to Atlanta, where he played guitar in cover bands before earning a spot in Tinsley Ellis’s touring act. At Ellis’s behest, Oliver began to sing and then founded King Johnson, a hard-touring group that would release six albums of blues-inflected R&B, funk and country over the next 12 years. Chris, meanwhile, studied jazz bass at the New England Conservatory of Music, moved to New York City and, in the early ‘90s, formed Medeski Martin & Wood, which over the next two decades would become a cornerstone of contemporary jazz and abstract music. After pursuing separate musical careers for some 15 years, the brothers performed together at a show in North Carolina: Oliver sat in with MM&W following King Johnson’s opening set. “I realized we should be playing music together,” Chris recalls. Soon after, the pair recorded a batch of Oliver’s songs, channeling the shared musical heroes of their youth while seizing on their own individual strengths — Oliver’s classic songwriting, Chris’s forward-thinking musicianship. A demo landed them a record deal with Blue Note, who released ‘Ways Not To Lose’ in 2006. Follow-up ‘Loaded’ came in 2008; after covers EP ‘Up Above My Head’ the next year, the band moved to Zac Brown’s Southern Ground Artists for ‘Smoke Ring Halo’ and then 2012’s ‘Live, Volume One: Sky High’ and ‘Live, Volume Two: Nail and Tooth.’ On ‘The Muse,’ following the opening one-two of “Wastin’ My Mind” and “Neon Tombstone,” the album shuffles between bluesy, classic country and swampy funk, mining the brothers’ timeless influences (Robert Johnson, Willie Nelson, Charles Mingus) while sounding fresh enough to win over fans of today’s mainstream roots-music acts (The Avett Brothers, Mumford & Sons). The title track shows Oliver’s songwriting at its most tender and autobiographical to date, as he sings of his “finest work yet” — his newborn child — in his endearingly offbeat voice, which The New York Times calls “gripping.” Chris takes the vocal lead on “Sweet Maria” and “Losin’,” and capably so, while on his standup bass, he’s often playful, even rascally, imbuing the songs with humor with his warm, unpredictable notes. Jano, when not banging on his shuitar, adds refreshing flourishes of piano and melodica. ‘The Muse’ marks another milestone for The Wood Brothers: it’s the first full-length they’ve recorded at Southern Ground Studios in Nashville. In the way that Manhattan becomes its own character in an old Woody Allen movie, the live room at Southern Ground plays a key role on the album, making its warm presence felt throughout. (There’s even a little hiss from the analog tape machine.) The choice of location was practical, given Nashville’s rich history and network of musicians, but also symbolic: The Wood Brothers are now officially a Nashville-based band, with Oliver having relocated in 2012, and Chris recently following. It’s the first time the brothers have lived in the same city since they left their parents’ nest; both are eager, along with Nashville local Jano, to plumb the sense of collaboration they tapped into during the fateful “Neon Tombstone” writing session. As Oliver says of ‘The Muse,’ “This is the first record that really feels like a band record. It’s taken years for us to really feel like we can collaborate, and I think this is the pinnacle of it so far.”

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Oct 3

Oct 3

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

“At the top of her game…” (San Francisco Chronicle)


“Never been funnier…” (Boston Globe)


"Insightful, thought-provoking humor… (Chicago Tribune)


32 years ago Paula Poundstone climbed on a Greyhound bus and traveled across the country -- stopping in at open mic nights at comedy clubs as she went. A high school drop-out, she went on to become one of the great humorists of our time. You can hear her through your laughter as a regular panelist on NPR’s popular rascal of a weekly news quiz show, Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me. She tours regularly, performing standup comedy across the country, causing Bob Zany with the Boston Globe to write: “Poundstone can regale an audience for several hours with her distinctive brand of wry, intelligent and witty comedy.” Audience members may put it a little less elegantly: “I peed my pants.” While there is no doubt that Poundstone is funny, the thing that separates her from the pack of comics working today and that has made her a legend among comics and audiences alike is her ability to be spontaneous with a crowd. Poundstone says: “No two shows I do are the same. It's not that I don't repeat material. I do. My shows, when they're good, and I like to think they often are, are like a cocktail party. When you first get there, you talk about how badly you got lost and how hard it was to find parking. Then you tell a story about your kids or what you just saw on the news. You meet some new people and ask them about themselves. Then, someone says, "Tell that story you used to tell," and then someone on the other side of the room spills a drink, and you mock them. No one ever applauds me when I leave a party, though. I think they high five.” Paula's interchanges with the audience are never mean or done at a person’s expense. She even manages to handle politics without provoking the pall of disapproval less artful comics have received. Paula’s touring schedule is rigorous. She performs an average of 75 dates per year, mostly in Performing Arts Centers and Theatres. For those who don’t have a chance to see her live, they can listen to her brilliance on her CD’s or read her in print: Her newest comedy CD, I HEART JOKES: Paula Tells Them in Boston was recorded during a performance at the historic Wilbur Theatre in the heart of the city and released on April Fool’s Day 2013. It follows her first CD, I HEART JOKES: Paula Tells Them in Maine (November 2007), recorded at the world-famous Stone Mt. Arts Center in none-other than, Maine! Both are available for sale thru Paula’s website at www.paulapoundstone.com, on Amazon, CDbaby, Itunes, and if you are there, at Paula’s shows! Paula is also an accomplished writer. Her first hard cover book, There is Nothing In This Book That I Meant To Say, with a forward by Mary Tyler Moore, was published in 2006 by Harmony Books, a division of Random House. It is still in release on audio (Highbridge) and in paperback. Paula is hard at work on her second book, this one for Algonquin Press. Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me is now the most popular show on NPR, having reached #1 status in 2014. Listeners can test their knowledge against some of the best and brightest in the news and entertainment world while figuring out what's real news and what's made up. Paula quickly goes on record about how much she loves being part of the show saying: “I am a proud member of the endorphin production industry. They allow me to say whatever I want on Wait, Wait…Don't Tell Me. The panelists are unscripted, so it's perfect for me. I feel like I'm a batter in a batting cage. I get lobbed topics. Sometimes I just watch them go by, but every now and then I get a piece of one. If the others didn't cheat, it would be an almost perfect work experience.” The show is also heard internationally on NPR Worldwide and on the Internet via podcast. In May 2013 the show was Cinecast to movie theatres across the country.Paula was on the show, as was Steve Martin. Paula recently did commentary on CBS Sunday Morning. Her editorial pieces can be heard on NPR's All Things Considered. An avid reader, Paula signed on as the National Spokesperson for the American Library Association’s (ALA) United for Libraries in 2008 – a role she continues to this day! United for Libraries is a national citizen’s support group that works to raise funds and awareness for their local libraries. Said Paula, when she was chosen, “It’s funny that we think of libraries as quiet demure places where we are shushed by dusty, bun-balancing, bespectacled women. The truth is libraries are raucous clubhouses for free speech, controversy and community. Librarians have stood up to the Patriot Act, sat down with noisy toddlers and reached out to illiterate adults. Libraries can never be shushed.” As part of her duties, Paula recorded a public service announcement for United for Libraries and helps raise funds. For the last four years she has also been the headline panelist at the ALA’s annual conference for their “Laughs On Us” panel of writers. To quote Sally Reed, the ALA Nat'l Director: "...you'd have to come to one of these events to see how adored Paula is by librarians. We love her and it's never repetitive." Paula's incredible spontaneous humor is the perfect fit for the voracious appetite of the social networks: Follow her on: Twitter@twitter.com/paulapoundstone; Facebook: facebook.com/PaulaPoundstone. And enjoy her website: www.paulapoundstone.com Paula grew up in Sudbury, Massachusetts, and began performing at open-mic nights in 1979. Over the span of her career, she has amassed a list of awards and accolades that stretch the length of a great big tall guy’s arm. She not only shot through the glass ceiling, she never acknowledged it was there. She was never one to stereotype herself as a ‘female comedian’ or limit herself to comedy from a ‘female’ point of view. In the early 90’s she was the first woman to win the cable ACE for Best Standup Comedy Special and the first woman to be invited to perform standup at the prestigious White House Correspondents dinner where she joined the current President as part of the evening’s entertainment. Paula starred in a self-titled series for HBO in ’93 (for which she won her second Cable ACE Award for Best Program Interviewer) and moved the show to ABC which was short-lived, but applauded for its break from convention. Paula had her own comedy specials on HBO and BRAVO. In fact, she starred in several comedy specials on HBO, including “Paula Poundstone Goes to Harvard,” the only time the elite university has allowed their name to be used in the title of a television show. If it means anything to anyone, Paula is recognized as one of Comedy Central's 100 greatest stand-ups of all time. She won an American Comedy Award for Best Female Standup Comic, and in 2010 she was one of a select group voted into the Comedy Hall of Fame. Late-night America roared when Paula served as "official correspondent" for The Tonight Show during the 1992 Presidential race. This was followed by her extremely successful backstage commentary during the 1993 Emmy telecast. She has made numerous appearances on all the late night talk shows, including David Letterman, and a regular stint with Craig Ferguson. She has also appeared on The Today Show, Good Morning America, and guested several times on Garrison Keillor’s A Prairie Home Companion. In 2000, when a syndicated version of the popular game show To Tell The Truth came calling for Paula to be one of the panelists, she found another perfect showcase for her razor-sharp humor and spontaneous wit. Beginning in 1997, Paula voiced the character of Judge Stone on the acclaimed ABC-TV Saturday morning animated series Science Court (a.k.a. “Squigglevision”) for three years. In 1999 (the premiereseason) she added to her repertoire the voice of the Mom, ‘Paula’ in what is still considered a renownedcult show, Home Movies (UPN and The Cartoon Network). Paula guest starred on the CBS series Cybill, which led to a recurring role during the show’s final season, and also appeared on PBS favorites such as Sesame Street and Storytime. She won a local Emmy Award for her field pieces on the erudite “Life & Times” for PBS station KCET. She appeared on several network television specials including A Salute to The President from Fords Theatre on ABC when President Clinton was in office, and performed on every Comic Relief Special on HBO. These specials were heralded for the hundreds of thousands of dollars raised for the homeless and the lineup of stars. Paula has also enjoyed success as a Host of many events, including the Art Directors Guild Awards, an unprecedented 4 times, Logically Paula is almost always included in any compendium – be it film, television or print, noting comedic influences of the 20th/21st century. They include Why We Laugh Too: Women of Comedy (Lions Gate feature-length documentary, Showtime, 2013); We Killed: The Rise of Women in American Comedy (Sarah Crichton Books, 2012.) One of Paula’s quotes is even included in a new beautifully illustrated coffee table book on cats alongside quotes by notable authors and artists including W. H. Auden, Mark Twain, and Henry David Thoreau (Chronicle Books, 2015). Paula’s other writing credits include the back page column for Mother Jones from 1995-1998, the “Sunday Calendar” section for the Los Angeles Times, Entertainment Weekly, and Glamour magazine. In 2006 Paula authored a series of three math books with her high school Math teacher, Faye Ruopp: The Sticky Problem of Parallelogram Pancakes: And Other Skill-Building Math Activities, Grades 4-5; Venn Can We Be Friends?: And Other Skill-Building Math Activities, Grades 6-7; You Can't Keep Slope Down: And Other Skill-Building Math Activities, Grades 8-9. These are all available thru Amazon. Paula has three children, Toshia, Allison, and Thomas E. Poundstone. The family lives in Santa Monica, California.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Oct 4

Oct 4

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $15

Event Information

The music of The Growlers is unmistakable. Sure, you can hone in on some influences baked into the work of this California-bred band. Heck, even they’d cop to a few, like Ricky Nelson and The Clash. But once those same RIYL tags have been filtered through the minds and hands and voices of this five-piece, there’s simply nothing else like it. The Growlers took the phrase “Beach Goth” as an apt descriptor of their music. Sunburned and salty, that term perfectly describes their distinctive melding of reverb heavy surf guitar and Bakersfield-style honky tonk with ‘80s post-punk. This is especially true of Chinese Fountain, The Growlers’ fifth full-length set to be released on September 23rd via Everloving Records. The 11 songs found on it are some of the strongest that they’ve committed to tape yet; a byproduct not only of eight years in the trenches together, but finely honing their gypsy folk dirges and psychedelic sea shanties to fans at close to 150 shows each year. The connection between vocalist Brooks Nielsen and guitarist Matt Taylor (the principal songwriters of the group) has only grown deeper. “The band played better than they’ve ever played,” says Nielsen. “We’ve got the process down now. There’s less screwing around to get the songs laid out and we weren’t waiting around for take after take. We knew it and we played without much time to spare.” That confidence bleeds through every track on Chinese Fountain, with the band assured enough to layer in shades of many new influences: the loping ska beat of “Dull Boy” and “Going Gets Tuff,” the playful disco beat behind the title track, or the Teardrop Explodes-like agitation of “Good Advice.” Not that the band left themselves much room to second-guess anything. The five spent about three weeks writing the tracks, and about half that time in the studio recording them. That may sound rushed, but it’s not as if you can hear any strain on the finished product; Chinese Fountain is as rock solid and watertight as anything in their still-growing discography. There’s evolution to be heard in Chinese Fountain as well, courtesy of some of Nielsen’s most pointed and poignant lyrics to date. He takes our obsession with the online world to task on the funky title track. When he drops the bomb that obliterates that most famous of Beatles’ claims with "The internet is bigger than Jesus or John Lennon” he re-contextualizes Marshall McLuhan's "the medium is the message" in the same breath. He urges positivity no matter the obstacles (“Going Gets Tuff”). Too, he reveals a tattered heart to the world on tracks like “Rare Hearts” and “Love Test.” “This is my chance to let it all out,” Nielsen says of these songs. “I kind of bottle things up and don’t really get emotional. But I think if I don’t open up, I’d be a really stale person.”

Academy of Music - Northampton, MA

Oct 6

Oct 6

Doors open at 6:30 pm Starts at 7:30 pm All ages

Event Information

The youngest of seven children, Patty Griffin grew up hearing her mother sing while doing housework and her grandmother's family sing on the front porch at night. In addition to listening intently to the Beatles, Griffin was fascinated by the music of Bruce Springsteen and Rickie Lee Jones. Although she acquired a $50 guitar and began writing songs at the age of 16, Griffin gave little thought to a career as a musician. After living in Florida for nearly two years, she moved to Boston and married, and while her husband encouraged her to perform, she spent most of her time waitressing. However, upon her divorce in 1992, Griffin found herself on her own and began to perform in Boston-area coffeehouses. She quickly attracted attention to her well-crafted songs and gutsy vocals. After Griffin's over-produced demo tape reached the ears of a talent scout, she was encouraged to re-record it with just her guitar and voice. Within six months, the redone demo resulted in Griffin being offered a recording contract with A&M. The tape was later released as Griffin's debut, Living With Ghosts, and inspired comparisons with recordings by Tori Amos and Alanis Morissette. Griffin's second album, Flaming Red, was released in 1998. Both records showcased the poetic lyricism, bluesy alto vocals, and melodic guitar picking that defined her style and brought her admiration. Four years later, Griffin appeared with a modest acoustic effort entitled 1,000 Kisses. While touring in support of the album in 2002, Griffin documented behind-the-scenes footage for a future DVD collection. A Kiss in Time, which appeared in October 2003, included coverage of the tour, interviews, and two full-length videos. A separate disc capturing Griffin's live stint at Nashville's Ryman Auditorium accompanied the package. Artists such as Lisa Germano, Emmylou Harris, and Buddy & Julie Miller joined Griffin for the recording of her fourth album, Impossible Dream, which appeared in April 2004. Almost three years later, Children Running Through was released. Griffin's sixth full-length outing, the gospel-infused Downtown Church, a collection of traditional and gospel materiel, was recorded in Nashville's Downtown Presbyterian Church, and arrived in January 2010. She wrote two selections for the album as well. That same year she appeared on Robert Plant's Band of Joy recording and tour. Griffin's next album of new original studio material, American Kid, appeared in early May of 2013; the album debuted at 36 on the Billboard Top 2000. That fall, her shelved 2000 album Silver Bell -- it got lost in record-label mergers of the time -- saw its long overdue release.

F.M. Kirby Center - Wilkes-Barre, PA

Oct 6

Oct 6

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Two veteran singer/songwriters join forces for a unique and intimate acoustic performance and deliver one of the most compelling and spontaneous concerts on the road.

A Grammy Award-winning singer, composer and actor, Lyle Lovett is one of music’s most vibrant and iconic performers. He has broadened the definition of American music, fusing elements of country, swing, jazz, folk, gospel and blues in a manner that defies convention and breaks down barriers. It is no surprise that the Americana Music Association awarded him its inaugural Trailblazer Award.

John Hiatt is a talented singer and guitarist best known for his prolific songwriting. His songs have been covered by musicians from Bonnie Raitt and the Neville Brothers to Iggy Pop and Three Dog Night. With 11 Grammy nominations and 24 albums to his name, he was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and won the Americana Music Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Oct 8

Oct 8

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $18-$20

Event Information

Like their celestial namesake, Stars only come out at night. It’s been 14 years since the Montreal band debuted with an album of intimate synth-pop whispers titled Nightsongs, but really, any of the increasingly assertive and sonically elaborate records they’ve released since could be named that. Whether between the sheets or on the streets, the nighttime is when the most pivotal moments of your life play out: the drunken dusk-to-dawn hangs through which eternal friendships are forged; the knowing glance across the dancefloor that leads to exchanged phone numbers, that ominous 3 a.m. phone call from the hospital; the decision to turn a new leaf that can only come when you’ve spent five despairing hours staring at a ceiling fan. These are the worlds that Stars songs inhabit, to show us that, even in our most vulnerable and naked states, we are never truly alone.

Stars’ albums have always served as thermochromic barometers of their makers’ emotional well-being, be it the romantic upheaval of 2003’s Heart and 2004’s Set Yourself On Fire, the newsticker-triggered discontent of 2007’s In Our Bedroom After the War, the downcast elegies of 2010’s The Five Ghosts (a requiem for singer Torquil Campbell’s father, who passed away during the album’s creation), or the rejuvenation of 2012’s The North (recorded while inter-band couple Amy Millan and Evan Cranley were in the throes of new parenthood). However, as Millan admits, the band initially approached its new seventh album from a place of relative stability. “We’ve always had so many things defining every album, whether it was the band going through a difficult emotional turmoil, Torq’s father passing away, or us having children. And now it’s like: You know what? We’re pretty good. This is one of the best times of our lives.”

This time around, Stars decided to scratch the seven-album itch by shaping their own environment. After inheriting the Mile End rehearsal space vacated by the then-disbanding Handsome Furs, Stars refashioned the space—“basically a dirty apartment,” says Cranley—into a fully operational studio, where recording for No One Is Lost began last December with old friend Liam O’Neil (Metric, The Stills) behind the boards.

“It was initially quite painstaking,” says keyboardist Chris Seligman. “But we put love into our space and our space gave us love back.”

Campbell is also a parent, but his recording sojourns in Montreal allowed him to keep, shall we say, more traditional musician’s hours.

“I’m a nighttime guy, I don’t really like making records in the day,” says Campbell, who made the studio his home for the duration of his recording sessions. “I slept on the couch. I’ve never enjoyed making a record so much, because I always hated going home at the end of the day. This time, in Montreal, the studio was my home.”

Funnily enough, it was during one of Campbell’s studio sleepovers that the city itself became truly present: noise was bleeding in from the gay discotheque, The Royal Phoenix, located on the floor below them.

Says Campbell: “I went to sleep to the sound of Charli XCX every night—and I loved it.”

So rather than fight the funk, Stars rolled alongside, with the incessant 4/4 thump emanating from below serving as the metronomic template that would form the basis of No One Is Lost. You can hear that influence percolate in real time on the album’s monumental lead-off track “From the Night”—Stars’ most epic opening salvo since Set Yourself on Fire’s “Your Ex-Lover Is Dead”—with a near-subliminal pulse vibrating the floorboards beneath your feet before exploding into a kaleidoscopic, French-touched house jam. And that crowd noise you hear at the beginning? That’s Millan and Seligman walking into The Royal Phoenix during a Friday-night rager, field-recording gear in hand.

“The sub-bass throb coming from the club below our studio was undeniably and unavoidably influential,” affirms drummer Pat McGee. “It motivated us to out-throb the throb.”

But the Royal Phoenix proved to be more than just a musical inspiration; the bar essentially served as Stars’ home away from home, with the band coming to know the servers on a first-name basis, and even getting cocktails christened in their honour. And through observing the bacchanalia playing out every weekend in their de facto rec room, the thematic framework for the album came into focus.

“I always find it so moving and beautiful to watch people have their nights out. “ Campbell explains. “There’s something so heartbreaking about it: People have jobs that they have to get up for, jobs they hate, and they live for the weekend; they live for these moments. And they put everything they have into it: They put all their money into it, they put their emotion into it, they sacrifice their health for it, just to make a connection out there, and go home with someone and not be alone.”

During the writing of the new album, Stars were hit with another cruelly sobering reminder of just how precious our days here on this planet really are: the band’s long-time manager, Eoin O Leary, was diagnosed with cancer.

Fortunately, No One Is Lost translates all that anxiety into pure ecstasy, from the laser-cut new-waved precision of Millan’s “This Is the Last Time” to the soaring, Mozzerific chorus of Campbell’s “Trap Door” to the dreamy duet “Look Away.” And the titanic title track-closer—the sound of a dancefloor being swallowed whole by an ocean of sweat and swapped spit—feels like the moment Stars’ entire 15-year journey has been leading up to, a euphoric house banger that distills all the hope, fear, joy, sadness, and sex in the band’s songbook into a pair of unshakeable mantras: “put your hands up because everybody dies / put your hands up if you know you’re going to lose.”

“The fact Eoin got cancer is definitely sewn into the fabric of the album, lyrically and sonically,” Millan reveals. “Because you had to believe he was going to be okay. [Spoiler alert: he’s currently recovering from treatment quite nicely.] I think that’s where the title No One Is Lost comes from: We were the army standing behind him.”

Campbell, for his part, offers a somewhat more urgent interpretation:

“This record’s called No One Is Lost because that is a fucking lie. We are all lost, we are all going to lose this game and, as you get older, you lose people more and more. Eoin’s been facing down the Grim Reaper, and that was bringing us the fuck down. But we decided to go for it anyway, and so did he, and it was enormous act of blind hope to even think he would make it this far. So I wanted to call this record No One Is Lost because I just wanted to close my eyes and jump and hope that was true. Life is loss, love is loss. And loving people is about accepting that you’re going to have to say goodbye to them. And that’s why it’s fucking brave. It’s easy to hate, because you never have to let go of anything. It takes guts to be gentle and kind. That’s Stars’ ethos: this life is very heartbreaking and sad… so let’s get completely fucking arseholed and listen to some Dionne Warwick.”

Alas, Stars will need to find a new place to get arseholed: The day that the mastering of No One Is Lost was completed last July, word got out that The Royal Phoenix was closing, despite its undiminished popularity among local revellers. But then, this sudden turn of events was an oddly appropriate denouement for an album that evolved according to its own curious logic. After all, No One Is Lost is a record that began with Stars building a studio hideaway that allowed them to function as a self-contained unit free of external pressures, yet wound up being greatly shaped by its surrounding environment. And it’s a record that, at its core, was intended as a celebration of life but became a rallying cry for an ailing friend and, now, a eulogy to a beloved bar. But that’s the equally wonderful and terrifying thing about living for the night: you never know what the next one’s going to bring you. Each sundown marks not the end of the day, but the beginning of a new adventure into the unknown—and No One Is Lost is the radiant flash of pink neon that lights the way. So, go dance.

Berklee Performance Center - Boston, MA

Oct 9

Oct 9

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Arlo Guthrie was born with a guitar in one hand and a harmonica in the other, in Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York in 1947. He is the eldest son of America's most beloved singer/writer/philosopher Woody Guthrie and Marjorie Mazia Guthrie, a professional dancer with the Martha Graham Company and founder of The Committee to Combat Huntington's Disease.

For more than a decade, Arlo has toured worldwide with different shows: An America Scrapbook, beginning 1998 (with symphony orchestras), The Guthrie Family Legacy Tour, beginning 2006 (with various family members), Boys Night Out Tour, beginning 2008 (with his son, Abe Guthrie and Grandson, Krishna), The Lost World Tour, beginning 2008 (with a big band and The Burns Sisters), The Guthrie Family Rides Again Tour beginning in 2009 (with the entire family), The Journey On Tour beginning 2010 (Big band & The Burns sisters), The Guthrie Family Reunion Tour beginning 2012 (The whole family), Here Comes The Kid - The Woody Guthrie Centennial Tour beginning 2012), Here Come The Kid(s) beginning in 2013 (continuing the Woody Centennial). The Centennial celebration tour ends May 2014.

Interspersed between all the tours was the recurring "Arlo Guthrie Solo Reunion Tour - Together At Last," which was certainly the best named tour. The currant version of the solo tour runs from June 2014 - November 2014. After the solo tour Arlo will put "Alice's Restaurant" back on the setlist menu for "The Alice's Restaurant 50th Anniversary Tour", with will run from January 2015 through May 2016. If he survives the "Alice 50 Tour" he will go fishing.

He grew up surrounded by dancers and musicians: Pete Seeger, Ronnie Gilbert, Fred Hellerman and Lee Hays (The Weavers), Leadbelly, Cisco Houston, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, all of whom were significant influences on Arlo's musical career. Guthrie gave his first public performance in 1961 at age 13 and quickly became involved in the music that was shaping the world. Over the next few years, Arlo inherited his father's friend Pete Seeger and the two toured together, between demonstrations, beginning in the late 60's. They continued doing over a dozen shows together almost every year for the next 40 years creating a legendary collaboration that continues to this day. The last Pete & Arlo show was in November 2012 at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

Arlo practically lived in the most famous venues of the "Folk Boom" era. In New York City he hung out at Gerdes Folk City, The Gaslight and The Bitter End. In Boston's Club 47, and in Philadelphia he made places like The 2nd Fret and The Main Point his home. He witnessed the transition from an earlier generation of ballad singers like Richard Dyer-Bennet and blues-men like Mississippi John Hurt, to a new era of singer-song writers such as Bob Dylan, Jim Croce, Joan Baez, and Phil Ochs. He grooved with the beat poets like Allen Ginsburg and Lord Buckley, and picked with players like Bill Monroe and Doc Watson. He learned something from everyone and developed his own style, becoming a distinctive, expressive voice in a crowded community of singer-songwriters and political-social commentators.

Arlo Guthrie's career exploded in 1967 with the release of "Alice's Restaurant", whose title song premiered at the Newport Folk Festival helped foster a new commitment among the '60s generation to social consciousness and activism. Arlo went on to star in the 1969 Hollywood film version of "Alice's Restaurant", directed by Arthur Penn. With songs like "Alice's Restaurant", too long for radio airplay; "Coming into Los Angeles", banned from many radio stations (but a favorite at the 1969 Woodstock Festival); and the definitive rendition of Steve Goodman's "City of New Orleans", Guthrie was no One-Hit-Wonder. An artist of international stature, he has never had a 'hit' in the usual sense. He has usually preferred to walk to his own beat rather than march in step to the drum of popular culture. Over the last five decades Guthrie has toured throughout North America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia winning a wide, popular following. In addition to his accomplishments as a musician, playing the piano, six and twelve-string guitar, harmonica and a dozen other instruments, Arlo is a natural-born storyteller, whose tales and anecdotes figure prominently in his performances.

In 1991 Arlo purchased the old Trinity Church. It was Thanksgiving 1965 that events took place at the church which inspired Arlo to write the song "Alice's Restaurant". Named for his parents, The Guthrie Center is a not-for-profit interfaith church foundation dedicated to providing a wide range of local and international services. Its outreach programs include everything from providing HIV/AIDS services to baking cookies with a local service organization; an HD walk-a-thon to raise awareness and money for a cure for Huntington's Disease, and offering a place simply to meditate. The Guthrie Foundation is a separate not-for-profit educational organization that addresses issues such as the environment, health care, cultural preservation and educational exchange. Arlo Guthrie, Rising Son Records and The Guthrie Center & Foundation are on the World Wide Web at http://www.risingsonrecords.com/

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Oct 9

Oct 9

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

The youngest of seven children, Patty Griffin grew up hearing her mother sing while doing housework and her grandmother's family sing on the front porch at night. In addition to listening intently to the Beatles, Griffin was fascinated by the music of Bruce Springsteen and Rickie Lee Jones. Although she acquired a $50 guitar and began writing songs at the age of 16, Griffin gave little thought to a career as a musician. After living in Florida for nearly two years, she moved to Boston and married, and while her husband encouraged her to perform, she spent most of her time waitressing. However, upon her divorce in 1992, Griffin found herself on her own and began to perform in Boston-area coffeehouses. She quickly attracted attention to her well-crafted songs and gutsy vocals. After Griffin's over-produced demo tape reached the ears of a talent scout, she was encouraged to re-record it with just her guitar and voice. Within six months, the redone demo resulted in Griffin being offered a recording contract with A&M. The tape was later released as Griffin's debut, Living With Ghosts, and inspired comparisons with recordings by Tori Amos and Alanis Morissette. Griffin's second album, Flaming Red, was released in 1998. Both records showcased the poetic lyricism, bluesy alto vocals, and melodic guitar picking that defined her style and brought her admiration. Four years later, Griffin appeared with a modest acoustic effort entitled 1,000 Kisses. While touring in support of the album in 2002, Griffin documented behind-the-scenes footage for a future DVD collection. A Kiss in Time, which appeared in October 2003, included coverage of the tour, interviews, and two full-length videos. A separate disc capturing Griffin's live stint at Nashville's Ryman Auditorium accompanied the package. Artists such as Lisa Germano, Emmylou Harris, and Buddy & Julie Miller joined Griffin for the recording of her fourth album, Impossible Dream, which appeared in April 2004. Almost three years later, Children Running Through was released. Griffin's sixth full-length outing, the gospel-infused Downtown Church, a collection of traditional and gospel materiel, was recorded in Nashville's Downtown Presbyterian Church, and arrived in January 2010. She wrote two selections for the album as well. That same year she appeared on Robert Plant's Band of Joy recording and tour. Griffin's next album of new original studio material, American Kid, appeared in early May of 2013; the album debuted at 36 on the Billboard Top 2000. That fall, her shelved 2000 album Silver Bell -- it got lost in record-label mergers of the time -- saw its long overdue release.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Oct 10

Oct 10

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

THE MACHINE, America’s top Pink Floyd show, has forged a 25 year reputation of excellence, extending the legacy of Pink Floyd, while creating another legacy all their own. Over the years, The Machine has touched the hearts and souls of many, selling out theaters, large clubs and casinos across North and Central America, Europe and Asia. They have also appeared at renowned music festivals such as Bonnaroo, Riverbend, Gathering of the Vibes, Buffalo's Artpark, and Germany’s Rock of Ages.

The New York based band focuses on making every show an authentic Floydian experience for their fans. Known for performing a diverse mix of The Floyd’s extensive 16-album repertoire (complete with faithful renditions of popular hits as well as obscure gems), The Machine’s stellar musicianship, dramatic lighting and video, and their passionate delivery sets them above and beyond the rest.

In the classic tradition, The Machine explores collective improvisation paralleling and even rivaling that of an early 1970’s Pink Floyd mentality. Their use of expanded theatrical elements and elaborate stage displays continues in the spirit of the later Floyd lineups of the 1980’s. The band is also known for recreating entire albums as a part of their show, accepting requests from fans, and for taking an A to Z approach in which one song is played for every letter of the alphabet. Additionally, the quartet has been sharing the stage with full symphony orchestras, including the Atlanta, Detroit, Pittsburgh and San Diego Symphonies.

In 2004, Two Nights at the Keswick was released as a DVD/CD, archiving the band’s bi-annual residency at this historic Philadelphia venue. Their next release, Unplugged (2006) captures a special acoustic performance at B.B. King’s in NYC featuring rare Syd Barrett solo material and deep cuts from early Floyd albums. Live In Amsterdam, a stunning concert DVD filmed at the Pepsi Stage, was released in August of 2008.

Memorial Auditorium - Burlington, VT

Oct 15

Oct 15

Doors open at 6:30 pm Starts at 7:30 pm All ages

Event Information

Modest Mouse was formed in 1993 in Issaquah, Washington and over the last decade has become the indie rock standard and one of the few bands capable of treading the narrow path where massive popularity is possible without sacrificing their longtime fans. The band released their first full-length album, This Is A Long Drive For Someone With Nothing To Think About, on the Up label in 1996. With the release of their second album, The Lonesome Crowded West in 1997, the band’s status reached new heights with a legion of fans and critical acclaim. In 2000, Modest Mouse was signed to Epic Records and released their third album, The Moon & Antarctica. In 2004 came the release of their breakthrough album, Good News For People Who Love Bad News, which included the hit “Float On,” has sold over 1.5 million copies and earned the band two Grammy nominations The most recent Modest Mouse album, We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank, was released on March 20, 2007 and immediately entered the Billboard Top 200 chart at #1. On August 4th, 2009 Modest Mouse released a special EP, No One’s First, And You’re Next. This new EP contains eight songs, six of which were released as limited edition 7” vinyl singles. Also included on the EP is ‘King Rat’ which was a limited promo-only 7” single free with the purchase of We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank in 2007 and ‘I’ve Got It All (Most)’ which was the b-side to the ‘Float On’ single in 2004 and is currently out of print. No One’s First, And You’re Next debuted at #15 on the Billboard Top 200 and was the #2 Digital Album. Simultaneous to the EP release, Modest Mouse released the highly anticipated Heath Ledger directed video for ‘King Rat,” a track also included on the No One’s First, And You’re Next EP.

College Street Music Hall. - New Haven, CT

Oct 21

Oct 21

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Modest Mouse was formed in 1993 in Issaquah, Washington and over the last decade has become the indie rock standard and one of the few bands capable of treading the narrow path where massive popularity is possible without sacrificing their longtime fans. The band released their first full-length album, This Is A Long Drive For Someone With Nothing To Think About, on the Up label in 1996. With the release of their second album, The Lonesome Crowded West in 1997, the band’s status reached new heights with a legion of fans and critical acclaim. In 2000, Modest Mouse was signed to Epic Records and released their third album, The Moon & Antarctica. In 2004 came the release of their breakthrough album, Good News For People Who Love Bad News, which included the hit “Float On,” has sold over 1.5 million copies and earned the band two Grammy nominations The most recent Modest Mouse album, We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank, was released on March 20, 2007 and immediately entered the Billboard Top 200 chart at #1. On August 4th, 2009 Modest Mouse released a special EP, No One’s First, And You’re Next. This new EP contains eight songs, six of which were released as limited edition 7” vinyl singles. Also included on the EP is ‘King Rat’ which was a limited promo-only 7” single free with the purchase of We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank in 2007 and ‘I’ve Got It All (Most)’ which was the b-side to the ‘Float On’ single in 2004 and is currently out of print. No One’s First, And You’re Next debuted at #15 on the Billboard Top 200 and was the #2 Digital Album. Simultaneous to the EP release, Modest Mouse released the highly anticipated Heath Ledger directed video for ‘King Rat,” a track also included on the No One’s First, And You’re Next EP.

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

General Admission Seated Event

Oct 23

Oct 23

Doors open at 6:30 pm Starts at 7:30 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $20

Event Information

This is a general admission seated event


Nels Cline is a major force as a guitarist and improviser, ever since he debuted on record in 1978 and as a leader in 1988. Named by Rolling Stone as one of 20 “new guitar gods” and one of the top 100 guitarists of all time, Cline has gained his widest fame as a member of acclaimed rock band Wilco since 2004. He’s known for a certain cranked-up experimental mayhem, the kind sometimes heard from his extraordinary trio the Nels Cline Singers, which released the well-received MACROSCOPE on Mack Avenue earlier in 2014. But throughout his career, Cline has undertaken projects, sometimes acoustic or semi-acoustic duos, highlighting an intimate and reflective approach that’s just as central to his artistry. With ROOM, Cline returns to Mack Avenue, creating a world of melodic beauty but also hard sonic edges and technical brilliance in the company of Julian Lage. At just 26, Lage has taken the world of jazz guitar by storm. The New York Times hails the “disarming spirit of generosity” in Lage’s music and notes the young guitarist’s “roots tangled up in jazz, folk, classical and country music.” In addition to his work with Mark O’Connor, the late Jim Hall, Anthony Wilson and a great many others, Lage leads his own groundbreaking groups as documented on the albums Gladwell and Sounding Point (the latter earning Lage a Grammy nomination). In a 2013 Q&A with JazzTimes, Lage described the Cline-Lage duo sound as “200 percent power,” and that’s exactly what comes through on ROOM: an inspired collection of originals and collaborative pieces that run the full range from intricately composed and complex to free and spontaneous. Cline builds on the strength of his previous duo work with the likes of Vinny Golia, Zeena Parkins, Elliott Sharp, Thurston Moore, Carla Bozulich, Marc Ribot and not least of all the late West Coast bassist Eric Von Essen, to which the gorgeous dual-acoustic showcase “Whispers from Eve” is dedicated. Lage, for his part, has worked in duo settings with David Grisman, Martin Taylor, John Abercrombie, Taylor Eigsti and others. Cline and Lage remain on acoustic guitars to end ROOM with “Calder,” a reference to the visionary sculptor Alexander Calder. “I have a Calder mobile that my mom sent me years ago when I moved back east,” Lage says. “It hangs in my apartment and I just love it. So though I wrote the tune first and the title came later, I felt like the presence of the mobile fit the mode of the piece well.” On ROOM one hears two guitar masters who span the generations, comfortable in every conceivable role, meeting the daunting challenges of these compositions while giving themselves over to the moment. In the JazzTimes Q&A, Cline credited the duo for revitalizing his playing overall: “I was burned out on touring, burned out on myself…. And when Julian and I started playing together it kicked my ass hard. At the same time it inspired me and refreshed my soul.” Lage replied, “Likewise.”

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Banditos

Oct 23

Oct 23

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $16.50-$20

Event Information

Age policy: 18+ with ID / under 18 with a parent or guardian

Academy of Music - Northampton, MA

Oct 29

Oct 29

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Joe Jackson will be releasing a new album Fast Forward on Oct 2nd and touring the US this fall - playing new and old material, solo and with a new band. The US tour will hit the Academy of Music in Northampton on October 29th. Along with songs from the new project, the show will include songs from his entire career, including his most popular albums (Look Sharp, Night and Day). Jackson will be "his own opening act," starting the show with a short solo piano/vocal set before bringing on the full band. The show will also include a surprising cover version or two, which will change from night to night. For this tour Jackson has reunited with longtime bassist Graham Maby, and added two distinguished and eclectic New York-based musicians, guitarist Teddy Kumpel and drummer Doug Yowell. "We're all strong singers," says Jackson, "and along with that and Teddy's diversity and mastery of effects, and Doug's use of electronic as well as live percussion, we'll sound like a lot more than four people. This tour is going to be a lot of fun - I can't wait." Fast Forward was produced and arranged by Jackson, and features four sets of four songs recorded in four different cities – New York, New Orleans, Berlin and Amsterdam – each with a different set of incredible supporting musicians. You can listen to "A Little Smile" (a track from the Amsterdam sessions) on the JoeJackson.com homepage right now.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Nov 8

Nov 8

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

The work of Scott Bradlee & Postmodern Jukebox has been viewed on the ensemble’s YouTube channel well over a hundred million times. Most of those doing the viewing, however, are not fully aware of the method to Bradlee’s madness.
On the surface, the method is video – clips of full-band performances (that’s Bradlee on piano) shot in the bandleader’s living room with a single stationary camera. The madness: pop hits of the present performed à la pop hits of the past. Miley Cyrus’ “We Can’t Stop” assayed as a doo- wop number; Macklemore and Ryan Lewis’ “Thrift Shop” tricked out in flapper jazz; Sam Smith’s “Stay With Me” rendered a 1940s big-band standard.
In fact, Bradlee’s method runs deeper. He’s educating his audience about 20th-century song styles; he’s commenting on the elasticity of the pop form; he’s confounding cultural context; he’s uniting generations; he’s breaking the rules. He’s manifesting postmodernist ideas in his approach to production and business as well as music. But as far as the fans are concerned, it’s just fun (and sometimes funny). Bradlee himself will tell you, simply, “I reimagine a song in another style because I want to hear it that way.”
Clearly, so does everyone else, as evidenced by PMJ’s presence on concert stages (stateside and abroad) and Billboard’s Jazz Albums chart, where its self-released 2014 opus
“Historical Misappropriation” landed in the Top 10 alongside
John Coltrane’s “Offering: Live at Temple University” and “All Rise: A Joyful Elegy for Fats Waller.”
This proximity of Bradlee’s outfit to Waller is particularly fitting; the former, a self-taught jazz pianist, considers the latter, an innovator of the Harlem stride style who helped lay the groundwork for modern jazz piano, a key influence, as is Jellyroll Morton, James P. Johnson and Art Tatum.
Which isn’t to discount the importance to Bradlee’s development of Michael Jackson’s “Bad,” the vinyl incarnation of which was, he says, “the first album I ever loved.” That was when he was six, growing up in Pattenburg, New Jersey, where he moved at four from Nesconset, New York. He took piano lessons, but they didn’t take. Then, at age 12, Bradlee heard “Rhapsody in Blue” and was forever changed. “I got the sheet music and taught myself how to play it,” he recalls. “I started wondering, ‘Where does this come from? What else sounds like this?’”
Asked what appealed to him about the popular music of the 1920s, ragtime especially, he says, “I could play it fast and loud. It was brash. And it had contempt for rules, which really appealed to me.”
Bradlee began his career as a jazz pianist during high school with a standing gig at a local eatery; he began his career as a pop-cultural provocateur during high school with a “this might be cool” ragtime medley of classic rock songs. “Not much has changed,” he says of the lyrical content of pop music. “In the 1920s, in the ’60s and ’70s, today – it’s still about love and drinking and dancing.”
He pursued Jazz Studies at the University of Hartford, then moved to New York to become a starving artist. He booked gigs, but as he puts it, “Jazz pianists are a dime a dozen in New York City.” So he moved to Astoria to save on rent and, in 2009, started making videos. “There was this niche on YouTube where people were doing experimental, interesting, funny things with music,” he notes. “It was another way to reach an audience.”
Bradlee’s first video was straight-up jazz. He didn’t have much footage of himself, however, so he decided to try a video experiment of his own: a ragtime medley of ’80s pop. He managed to amass 100 views. But through one of those viewers, Neil Gaiman discovered him. The author tweeted Bradlee’s flying fingers to his millions-strong Twitter following. Within a week, Bradlee reports, “more people had seen that video than had
seen me play live my entire life.”
Things went viral from there, affording Bradlee and the coalescing Postmodern Jukebox a receptive online crowd. Among Scott Bradlee & Postmodern Jukebox’s subsequent hits are a New Orleans-flavored take on Guns N’ Roses’ “Sweet Child o’ Mine” – 4+ million views; the “grandpa-style” reiteration of “Thrift Shop” – 6+ million views; and “We Can’t Stop” – 11.6 million views. Media coverage, including the likes of “Good Morning America” and NPR, ensued.
How does he come up with this stuff? “A lot of pop songs are constructed of elements that lend themselves to a certain feel,” he points out. “The simple progression of the bass line in ‘Blurred Lines,’ for instance, reminded me of bluegrass. ‘Sweet Child’ sounds like an old blues song – the structure, the way the chorus repeats ...” With Cyrus, it was more an instance of tongue-in- cheeky cultural criticism: “She’d gained all that notoriety from her 2013 VMA appearance. I had to recast her song for the ’50s, which everyone thinks of as this squeaky-clean era.”
Then there were the gifts from the pop-music gods, like Meghan Trainor’s #1 hit “All About That Bass.” Bradlee knew a musiciansinger named Kate Davis. “I’d wanted to do something with Kate for a while,” he reveals, “but I was waiting for the right song to come along.” Check the PMJ video for “All About That Bass” and you’ll find Davis singing – and playing stand-up bass. If you do click there, you’ll be in good company: 10 million views and counting.
The mashup of Davis and Trainor is some good old-fashioned A&R. The repertoire Bradlee selects for PMJ’s vocal artists has furnished a platform for some very talented but previously littleknown performers. And it’s not just the eyeballs afforded by YouTube; Bradlee provides an intuitive musical context for the singular gifts of these singers that allows them to be seen in a new light – it’s as if he’s somehow cracked the code to their essential appeal.
Take Puddles. “Last week, a seven-foot clown dropped by my apartment to sing an epic cover of Lorde’s ‘Royals.’ NBD,” Bradlee blogged in November of 2013. Puddles the Clown (née Michael Geier), frontman for Puddles Pity Party, is possessed of a dramatic baritone that has thrilled cabaret-goers for years – but it wasn’t until Bradlee asked Puddles to cover “Royals” in his signature style that he clicked with a mainstream audience. The reinterpretation of Lorde’s chart-topper, just one of Puddles’ collaborations with PMJ, has been viewed more than nine million times.
Discovering talent and knowing what to do with it is fundamental to the business of music. Bradlee is something of a postmodernist here, too, having achieved renown doing everything himself, mostly online, “with no budget” (i.e. using the recording equipment he’d had since college). His adherence to the DIY ethos also suggests the decidedly postmodern form of punk rock. “I was a struggling jazz pianist sitting in my basement apartment in Queens,” he attests, “but I just figured it out and made it happen.”
That said, punk rock is likely not top of mind for those attending a Scott Bradlee & Postmodern Jukebox show. The scene is more reminiscent of a speakeasy, with swells in vintage threads swilling Prohibition-era cocktails. “It’s a variety show, a musical revue featuring special guests,” Bradlee illuminates. “Coming to a PMJ show is like time-traveling back to Old Hollywood – it’s an experience.” Creating that for audiences appears to be PMJ’s ultimate mission.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Nov 11

Nov 11

Doors open at 7:15 pm Starts at 8:15 pm All ages

Event Information

Arlo Guthrie was born with a guitar in one hand and a harmonica in the other, in Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York in 1947. He is the eldest son of America's most beloved singer/writer/philosopher Woody Guthrie and Marjorie Mazia Guthrie, a professional dancer with the Martha Graham Company and founder of The Committee to Combat Huntington's Disease. For more than a decade, Arlo has toured worldwide with different shows: An America Scrapbook, beginning 1998 (with symphony orchestras), The Guthrie Family Legacy Tour, beginning 2006 (with various family members), Boys Night Out Tour, beginning 2008 (with his son, Abe Guthrie and Grandson, Krishna), The Lost World Tour, beginning 2008 (with a big band and The Burns Sisters), The Guthrie Family Rides Again Tour beginning in 2009 (with the entire family), The Journey On Tour beginning 2010 (Big band & The Burns sisters), The Guthrie Family Reunion Tour beginning 2012 (The whole family), Here Comes The Kid - The Woody Guthrie Centennial Tour beginning 2012), Here Come The Kid(s) beginning in 2013 (continuing the Woody Centennial). The Centennial celebration tour ends May 2014. Interspersed between all the tours was the recurring "Arlo Guthrie Solo Reunion Tour - Together At Last," which was certainly the best named tour. The currant version of the solo tour runs from June 2014 - November 2014. After the solo tour Arlo will put "Alice's Restaurant" back on the setlist menu for "The Alice's Restaurant 50th Anniversary Tour", with will run from January 2015 through May 2016. If he survives the "Alice 50 Tour" he will go fishing. He grew up surrounded by dancers and musicians: Pete Seeger, Ronnie Gilbert, Fred Hellerman and Lee Hays (The Weavers), Leadbelly, Cisco Houston, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, all of whom were significant influences on Arlo's musical career. Guthrie gave his first public performance in 1961 at age 13 and quickly became involved in the music that was shaping the world. Over the next few years, Arlo inherited his father's friend Pete Seeger and the two toured together, between demonstrations, beginning in the late 60's. They continued doing over a dozen shows together almost every year for the next 40 years creating a legendary collaboration that continues to this day. The last Pete & Arlo show was in November 2012 at Carnegie Hall in New York City. Arlo practically lived in the most famous venues of the "Folk Boom" era. In New York City he hung out at Gerdes Folk City, The Gaslight and The Bitter End. In Boston's Club 47, and in Philadelphia he made places like The 2nd Fret and The Main Point his home. He witnessed the transition from an earlier generation of ballad singers like Richard Dyer-Bennet and blues-men like Mississippi John Hurt, to a new era of singer-song writers such as Bob Dylan, Jim Croce, Joan Baez, and Phil Ochs. He grooved with the beat poets like Allen Ginsburg and Lord Buckley, and picked with players like Bill Monroe and Doc Watson. He learned something from everyone and developed his own style, becoming a distinctive, expressive voice in a crowded community of singer-songwriters and political-social commentators. Arlo Guthrie's career exploded in 1967 with the release of "Alice's Restaurant", whose title song premiered at the Newport Folk Festival helped foster a new commitment among the '60s generation to social consciousness and activism. Arlo went on to star in the 1969 Hollywood film version of "Alice's Restaurant", directed by Arthur Penn. With songs like "Alice's Restaurant", too long for radio airplay; "Coming into Los Angeles", banned from many radio stations (but a favorite at the 1969 Woodstock Festival); and the definitive rendition of Steve Goodman's "City of New Orleans", Guthrie was no One-Hit-Wonder. An artist of international stature, he has never had a 'hit' in the usual sense. He has usually preferred to walk to his own beat rather than march in step to the drum of popular culture. Over the last five decades Guthrie has toured throughout North America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia winning a wide, popular following. In addition to his accomplishments as a musician, playing the piano, six and twelve-string guitar, harmonica and a dozen other instruments, Arlo is a natural-born storyteller, whose tales and anecdotes figure prominently in his performances. In 1991 Arlo purchased the old Trinity Church. It was Thanksgiving 1965 that events took place at the church which inspired Arlo to write the song "Alice's Restaurant". Named for his parents, The Guthrie Center is a not-for-profit interfaith church foundation dedicated to providing a wide range of local and international services. Its outreach programs include everything from providing HIV/AIDS services to baking cookies with a local service organization; an HD walk-a-thon to raise awareness and money for a cure for Huntington's Disease, and offering a place simply to meditate. The Guthrie Foundation is a separate not-for-profit educational organization that addresses issues such as the environment, health care, cultural preservation and educational exchange. Arlo Guthrie, Rising Son Records and The Guthrie Center & Foundation are on the World Wide Web at http://www.risingsonrecords.com/

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Nov 13

Nov 13

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Bo Burnham has announced a second leg to his extremely successful 2015 MAKE HAPPY TOUR. Following on the heels of a sold out spring tour, this leg will hit 31 cities and kicks off September 29th at Keswick Theatre in Philadelphia, PA. Bo Burnham became the youngest person to ever record a half-hour Comedy Central special at the age of 18. He has released two hour-long specials since then: Words, Words, Words in 2010 and what. in 2013. The latter, what., was released on Netflix and YouTube simultaneously, and has since received over 8 million views on YouTube alone. Bo recently created and starred in the MTV series Zach Stone is Gonna Be Famous and wrote a book of poetry, EGGHEAD, which became a New York Times Bestseller. Bo's live shows are a unique blend of stand-up, music, and theatre.

The Smith Opera House - Geneva , NY

Nov 13

Nov 13

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

The Indigo Girls (Emily Saliers and Amy Ray) release their sixteenth studio album, One Lost Day, on June 2nd. Vast in its reach, but unified by the traveler’s sense of wonder, gratitude, and empathy, One Lost Day moves like a centrifuge, pulling the listener close to linger in the small moment, then casting out onto sonic currents. This is music of the past, present, and future — a boundlessness earned and not bestowed. One Lost Day has a feeling of music composed across time, not just in time. These songs are rooted in tradition and inventive, too: nourished in dark soils, leafing and luminous.
Memories here are more than specters; they are evolutions. The album maps the dim corridors of the heart and mind, lifting and landing the listener across state lines and continents. Place is a character rich in the universal specific: “Boots on a board in a barn” in “Texas Was Clean,” boys “under the bridge on the river shoals off GA 9″ in “Fishtails,” the New Orleans’ 1788 fire and the fence around the St. Louis cemetery in “Elizabeth,” the “sunny twist of Venice Chez Jay” in “Southern California is Your Girlfriend,” and the devil-spawned Angola prison in Louisiana where three black men sat wrongly convicted for decades, confined in solitary.

The dirge-like ballad “Findlay, Ohio 1968″ opens with a searing string and piano arrangement that feels like slipping through a tear in the space-time continuum. After we reach the violin’s held high-C and the heartbeat drums, and before Saliers kicks in with her chilling vocals, we hover, suspended in time, before landing gently on the hot asphalt of Grammy’s driveway in 1968, “poking hot tar bubbles with a stick…the smell of the trash and leaves burning in the can.” What unfolds is pure narrative intuition, wherein the stuff of life, life’s inventory — the pall of the impending Kent State massacre, Sexton’s poetry, Cathy’s grief-stricken, beer-drinking mom, the dad who never returned from Vietnam, the fence-scaling girl ripping jeans, the boy with wandering heart and hands, the smell of Trenton’s refineries and the slapping of the station wagon’s wheels — are the metaphoric legs that carry the story and this song across time and distance.

“Fishtails” tackles similar themes — loss of innocence, coming of age — but through a much different lens. Here, the narrator is the observer reflecting on the tender recklessness of neighborhood kids, killing time in an abandoned copper mine, waiting to flee the confines of their small world, raging and hoping and “fishtailing in the dark from the time that they are born.” But the song is infused with new meaning in the juxtaposition of the boys’ lives with Ray’s father’s long-ago Florida boyhood — so similar in its restlessness, its sweet violence. Circularity rings like a keening bell, dazzling and devastating. A multi-layered instrumentalism allows the long notes of the past to cradle the mid-tempo of the present, a lush but understated orchestration.

Regarding the aching ballad, “If I Don’t Leave Here Now,” Saliers says, “The song explores the terrible affliction of addiction and was partly inspired right after Philip Seymour Hoffman died. I was deeply affected by his death, but also know that addiction seldom spares the user. It is a song about the desperate attempt to leave a bad situation where no amount of anything is ever enough.” The elegiac, stripped-down sound pairs beautifully with tender lyrics that recognize addiction not as a denial of life, but as a dangerous insatiability for life (“Killing yourself to keep from running out of life”) — turning the conventional addiction narrative on its head.

“I’d rather have the strength to see through the lens of reality than rose-colored glasses,” Ray
says in reference to the raucous, rollicking “Happy in the Sorrow Key.” “Musically, I was
inspired by the feel of Paul Weller and The Jam, but then I also wanted this big orchestral bridge
to mirror the feeling of lying in my bunk at night on the tour bus and drifting off to sleep —
scared but in awe of the process of life.” The dissonance between the plaintive lyrics and the
quick-tempoed, lush instrumentalism nails the ambiguity of the emotion, while also managing to
create a rock song that is both fun and dirty.

A majority of the songs in this collection explore a time and place endemic to the narrator’s sense
of self. “Texas Was Clean” is a plucky, whispery elegy to lands loved and left behind. “It became
about how a place gets reinvented and defined by your experiences over time,” says Ray. “When
I was young, Texas seemed so far away and remote, but now it feels like it is part of me — for
the lives it’s claimed and for the life it’s given to me.” “Elizabeth,” the album’s joyful opener,
takes place in New Orleans, “with its ghosts and underbelly,” explains Saliers. “It’s the story of
kinship and music and whiskey, L’il Queenie and the Big Easy whose bloody print is indelible.
It’s denying Facebook and simply allowing someone from your past to remain in all her splendid
glory.” In fact, much of this album seems to argue against our culture’s obsession with immediate
gratification, both a musical and lyrical affinity for the journey and not the journey’s memento.
Venturing further north, “Alberta” is about the indelible impressions of a place and its history,
those that we keep close and those that we leave behind. “Olympia Inn” pays homage to a bus
driver named Johnny who called everyone “darling” and shared his lost loves, triumphs, and
failures late at night as the band toured the UK and Ireland. It’s a wild, rocking ride of a song.
“It’s meant to be romp with some swagger and self-deprecation thrown in for good measure,”
says Ray. “Emily experimented with different guitar sounds and vocal approaches to bring her
parts to life, and then Jordan [producer and contributing musician] put the organ down at the end
and used The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion as an inspiration.”

Like a good book, One Lost Day builds to the climactic “The Rise of The Black Messiah” about
two-thirds of the way through the album, imbuing the whole with a structural integrity inherent
to the best storytelling. This hard-hitting rock song is chilling, a battle-cry for victims of
institutional racism. “My friend I heard you tell of slavery’s end but have you heard of mass
incarceration/That ol’ Jim Crow he just keeps getting born with a new hanging rope for the black
man’s scourge,” bellows Ray. The song was inspired by a letter Ray received about seven years
ago from Herman Wallace, one of the so-called “Angola 3″: a trio of young black men framed
for the murder of a prison guard as punishment for speaking out about the horrifying conditions
in the Angola prison in Louisiana. Wallace spent decades in solitary confinement before finally
receiving “compassionate release” just days before his death from cancer. In his letter, he asked
Ray to share his story, and “The Rise of The Black Messiah” is Ray’s anthemic response; a slowbuilding,
thunderous rock song anchored by Brady Blade’s spirited, soulful drums.

On One Lost Day, the Girl’s signature harmonies are in full display: rolling, recursive, hot and
capacious as prayer. Through dynamic soundscapes created in tandem with producer Jordan
Brooke Hamlin, the album reveals structural innovations that enhance meaning. A classicallytrained
horn player, Hamlin contributed “layered ethereal horn parts and a strong vision and ear,”
says Saliers. With Hamlin, the Girls took new risks that paid huge dividends. The collaborative
spirit is loud here, utilizing a host of musicians both familiar and new to the duo. One Lost Day was recorded in studios in Nashville, TN and mixed by Brian Joseph at Justin Vernon’s (of Bon Iver) April Base Studios in Fall Creek, WI and at the Parhelion Recording Studios in Atlanta, GA. Amy and Emily brought in Lex Price (k.d. lang, Mindy Smith), Butterfly Boucher (Ingrid Michaelson, Katie Herzig, Mat Kearney), Fred Eltringham (Sheryl Crow, The Wallflowers, Gigolo Aunts) and Chris Donohue (Dave Matthews, Patty Griffin, Lucinda Williams, Robert Plant) to bring a good dose of infectious energy and creativity to the scene. Additionally, musicians Brady Blade and Carol Isaacs — longstanding studio collaborators and live-show band members with the Girls — returned, along with the current Indigo Girls’ touring band. Isaacs contributes haunting piano parts on songs such as “Come a Long Way,” “If I Don’t Leave Here Now,” and “Fishtails,” and sonorous accordion parts to “Spread the Pain Around” and “Findlay, Ohio 1968.” Blade offers his free-wheelin’, Louisiana drumming style to “Fishtails,” “Elizabeth,” “Texas Was Clean,” and the “The Rise of The Black Messiah.” The inputs of many of the contributing musicians are captured in a series of videos by the talented Kathlyn Horan, who filmed the crew during the recording of the album. The videos are available on the Indigo Girls’ website and in them we glimpse the ferocity and attention to detail that has helped the Indigo Girls thrive through the various capitulations of a changing music industry. Starting with 2009’s Poseidon and the Bitter Bug, their eleventh studio album, the Girls formed their own label, IG Recordings, which is now distributed by Vanguard/Concord Music Group. The move aligns with their long held commitment to creative freedom, energy they’ve also devoted to various social and environmental causes.

The Indigo Girls have spent thirty-five years performing together, produced fifteen albums (seven gold, four platinum, and one double platinum), earned a Grammy and seven Grammy nominations, and have toured arenas, festivals, and clubs the world over. It is rare to find musicians together so long, rarer still with such profound successes. Their music lives in the hearts of generations of dedicated fans and continues to inspire young musicians. This loyalty is not accidental. Perhaps their relevance over three decades can be credited to the mighty collisions of distinct aesthetics forging new paths over time. The Girls’ refinement — not only of style and skill, but of their own creative processes — allows access to ever new and liminal spaces.

A long creative marriage fosters its own scrappy beauty, though, and theirs grows more nuanced, weatherworn, and lovely in each successive album. Saliers and Ray live separate lives, take on independent projects, but share “the same set of values,” says Saliers. “We both embrace the struggle, share the same energy. We are sisters in our embrace of life. Observers.” That sort of artistic kinship is rare and cosmic. Here, then, are the stars of that labor, the next chapter.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Nov 14

Nov 14

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

GORDON LIGHTFOOT
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES:

"50 YEARS ON THE CAREFREE HIGHWAY TOUR"

After 50 active years of hit song making and international album sales well into the multi-millions, it's safe to say that esteemed singer-songwriter and musician Gordon Lightfoot resides with some very exclusive company atop the list of all-time greats. His song catalog is incredibly vast and includes such immortals as “Early Morning Rain,” “If You Could Read My Mind,” “Carefree Highway,” “Sundown,” “(That's What You Get) For Lovin Me,” “The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald," "Cold On The Shoulder", "Canadian Railroad Trilogy," "Ribbon Of Darkness," "Beautiful," "Song For A Winter's Night", "Shadows", "Rainy Day People", "Did She Mention My Name" and "Summertime Dream to name just a few.

But this year is special for the legendary artist who has announced plans for a cross-country USA tour entitled "Gordon Lightfoot - 50 Years On The Carefree Highway". The tour will feature his well known hits as well as some deep album cuts for the die-hard fans. All of which are woven together with some of Lightfoot's own behind the scenes stories and personal anecdotes about his historic 50year musical career. The event is sure to be a great thrill for live audiences and anyone who enjoys hearing great music and seeing a living legend in person.

Gordon Lightfoot has recorded 20 albums and has five Grammy nominations. His songs have been aired regularly for 50 years, earning him Radio Singles Chart Positions in North America achieved by few others. Lightfoot's radio hits in the USA have earned Five #1s, Five Top 10s and Thirteen Top 40 hits. In Canada he has earned Sixteen #1s, Eighteen Top 10s and Twenty One Top 40 hits.

Aside from his success in writing, singing and performing his own music, Lightfoot's songs have been recorded and performed by some of the greatest of all time including: Bob Dylan, Elvis Presley, Johnny
Cash, Hank Williams, Jr., Marty Robbins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Judy Collins, Eric Clapton, Johnny Mathis, Anne Murray, Olivia Newton-John, Sarah McLachlan, Barbra Streisand, Peter Paul & Mary, Harry Belafonte, Jane’s Addiction, Richie Havens, Glen Campbell, Toby Keith, Alison Krauss and George Hamilton IV.

In June of 2012 Lightfoot's legacy was further enhanced when he was inducted into the Songwriters Hall Of Fame. Lightfoot was honored for his role in defining the folk-pop sound of the 1960s and '70s. There are fewer than 400 inductees who make up the impressive roster enshrined in the Songwriters Hall of Fame including: Burt Bacharach, John Fogerty, Bob Dylan, Carole King, Paul Simon, Billy Joel, Elton John, Brian Wilson, James Taylor, James Brown, Bruce Springsteen, Jim Croce, Phil Collins, Loretta Lynn, Van Morrison, Kris Kristofferson, Dolly Parton, Diane Warren, Garth Brooks, and Leonard Cohen.

In his native Canada, Lightfoot has been decorated with the highest honors bestowed to a civilian including the Governor's General Award and the Companion to the Order of Canada honor of merit. He has also won 17 Juno Awards - Canada's equivalent to the Grammy Awards. Gordon is a member of Canada's Walk of
Fame and The Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame. In 2007, Canada Post honored him by issuing an official
Gordon Lightfoot postage stamp. Lightfoot is also in the Canadian Music Hall of Fame and the Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame. Gordon Lightfoot is an indelible part of the Canadian national spirit and regarded as perhaps the most prolific and greatest Canadian singer-songwriter of all time.


"Lightfoot became a mentor for a long time. I think he probably still is to this day. I can't think of any Gordon Lightfoot song I don't like. Every time I hear a song of his, I wish it would last forever. "
- Bob Dylan

"Gordon Lightfoot has created some of the most beautiful and lasting music of our time. He is Bob Dylan's favorite singer/songwriter - high praise from the best of us, applauded by the rest of us."
- Kris Kristofferson

"I've always been trying to write songs like Lightfoot. A song of mine like 'Come
Monday' is a direct result of me trying to write a Gordon Lightfoot song."
- Jimmy Buffett

"Canadian Railroad Trilogy is an extremely fine piece of songwriting. "
- Johnny Cash

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

Nov 14

Nov 14

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

The Indigo Girls (Emily Saliers and Amy Ray) release their sixteenth studio album, One Lost Day, on June 2nd. Vast in its reach, but unified by the traveler’s sense of wonder, gratitude, and empathy, One Lost Day moves like a centrifuge, pulling the listener close to linger in the small moment, then casting out onto sonic currents. This is music of the past, present, and future — a boundlessness earned and not bestowed. One Lost Day has a feeling of music composed across time, not just in time. These songs are rooted in tradition and inventive, too: nourished in dark soils, leafing and luminous.
Memories here are more than specters; they are evolutions. The album maps the dim corridors of the heart and mind, lifting and landing the listener across state lines and continents. Place is a character rich in the universal specific: “Boots on a board in a barn” in “Texas Was Clean,” boys “under the bridge on the river shoals off GA 9″ in “Fishtails,” the New Orleans’ 1788 fire and the fence around the St. Louis cemetery in “Elizabeth,” the “sunny twist of Venice Chez Jay” in “Southern California is Your Girlfriend,” and the devil-spawned Angola prison in Louisiana where three black men sat wrongly convicted for decades, confined in solitary.

The dirge-like ballad “Findlay, Ohio 1968″ opens with a searing string and piano arrangement that feels like slipping through a tear in the space-time continuum. After we reach the violin’s held high-C and the heartbeat drums, and before Saliers kicks in with her chilling vocals, we hover, suspended in time, before landing gently on the hot asphalt of Grammy’s driveway in 1968, “poking hot tar bubbles with a stick…the smell of the trash and leaves burning in the can.” What unfolds is pure narrative intuition, wherein the stuff of life, life’s inventory — the pall of the impending Kent State massacre, Sexton’s poetry, Cathy’s grief-stricken, beer-drinking mom, the dad who never returned from Vietnam, the fence-scaling girl ripping jeans, the boy with wandering heart and hands, the smell of Trenton’s refineries and the slapping of the station wagon’s wheels — are the metaphoric legs that carry the story and this song across time and distance.

“Fishtails” tackles similar themes — loss of innocence, coming of age — but through a much different lens. Here, the narrator is the observer reflecting on the tender recklessness of neighborhood kids, killing time in an abandoned copper mine, waiting to flee the confines of their small world, raging and hoping and “fishtailing in the dark from the time that they are born.” But the song is infused with new meaning in the juxtaposition of the boys’ lives with Ray’s father’s long-ago Florida boyhood — so similar in its restlessness, its sweet violence. Circularity rings like a keening bell, dazzling and devastating. A multi-layered instrumentalism allows the long notes of the past to cradle the mid-tempo of the present, a lush but understated orchestration.

Regarding the aching ballad, “If I Don’t Leave Here Now,” Saliers says, “The song explores the terrible affliction of addiction and was partly inspired right after Philip Seymour Hoffman died. I was deeply affected by his death, but also know that addiction seldom spares the user. It is a song about the desperate attempt to leave a bad situation where no amount of anything is ever enough.” The elegiac, stripped-down sound pairs beautifully with tender lyrics that recognize addiction not as a denial of life, but as a dangerous insatiability for life (“Killing yourself to keep from running out of life”) — turning the conventional addiction narrative on its head.

“I’d rather have the strength to see through the lens of reality than rose-colored glasses,” Ray
says in reference to the raucous, rollicking “Happy in the Sorrow Key.” “Musically, I was
inspired by the feel of Paul Weller and The Jam, but then I also wanted this big orchestral bridge
to mirror the feeling of lying in my bunk at night on the tour bus and drifting off to sleep —
scared but in awe of the process of life.” The dissonance between the plaintive lyrics and the
quick-tempoed, lush instrumentalism nails the ambiguity of the emotion, while also managing to
create a rock song that is both fun and dirty.

A majority of the songs in this collection explore a time and place endemic to the narrator’s sense
of self. “Texas Was Clean” is a plucky, whispery elegy to lands loved and left behind. “It became
about how a place gets reinvented and defined by your experiences over time,” says Ray. “When
I was young, Texas seemed so far away and remote, but now it feels like it is part of me — for
the lives it’s claimed and for the life it’s given to me.” “Elizabeth,” the album’s joyful opener,
takes place in New Orleans, “with its ghosts and underbelly,” explains Saliers. “It’s the story of
kinship and music and whiskey, L’il Queenie and the Big Easy whose bloody print is indelible.
It’s denying Facebook and simply allowing someone from your past to remain in all her splendid
glory.” In fact, much of this album seems to argue against our culture’s obsession with immediate
gratification, both a musical and lyrical affinity for the journey and not the journey’s memento.
Venturing further north, “Alberta” is about the indelible impressions of a place and its history,
those that we keep close and those that we leave behind. “Olympia Inn” pays homage to a bus
driver named Johnny who called everyone “darling” and shared his lost loves, triumphs, and
failures late at night as the band toured the UK and Ireland. It’s a wild, rocking ride of a song.
“It’s meant to be romp with some swagger and self-deprecation thrown in for good measure,”
says Ray. “Emily experimented with different guitar sounds and vocal approaches to bring her
parts to life, and then Jordan [producer and contributing musician] put the organ down at the end
and used The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion as an inspiration.”

Like a good book, One Lost Day builds to the climactic “The Rise of The Black Messiah” about
two-thirds of the way through the album, imbuing the whole with a structural integrity inherent
to the best storytelling. This hard-hitting rock song is chilling, a battle-cry for victims of
institutional racism. “My friend I heard you tell of slavery’s end but have you heard of mass
incarceration/That ol’ Jim Crow he just keeps getting born with a new hanging rope for the black
man’s scourge,” bellows Ray. The song was inspired by a letter Ray received about seven years
ago from Herman Wallace, one of the so-called “Angola 3″: a trio of young black men framed
for the murder of a prison guard as punishment for speaking out about the horrifying conditions
in the Angola prison in Louisiana. Wallace spent decades in solitary confinement before finally
receiving “compassionate release” just days before his death from cancer. In his letter, he asked
Ray to share his story, and “The Rise of The Black Messiah” is Ray’s anthemic response; a slowbuilding,
thunderous rock song anchored by Brady Blade’s spirited, soulful drums.

On One Lost Day, the Girl’s signature harmonies are in full display: rolling, recursive, hot and
capacious as prayer. Through dynamic soundscapes created in tandem with producer Jordan
Brooke Hamlin, the album reveals structural innovations that enhance meaning. A classicallytrained
horn player, Hamlin contributed “layered ethereal horn parts and a strong vision and ear,”
says Saliers. With Hamlin, the Girls took new risks that paid huge dividends. The collaborative
spirit is loud here, utilizing a host of musicians both familiar and new to the duo. One Lost Day was recorded in studios in Nashville, TN and mixed by Brian Joseph at Justin Vernon’s (of Bon Iver) April Base Studios in Fall Creek, WI and at the Parhelion Recording Studios in Atlanta, GA. Amy and Emily brought in Lex Price (k.d. lang, Mindy Smith), Butterfly Boucher (Ingrid Michaelson, Katie Herzig, Mat Kearney), Fred Eltringham (Sheryl Crow, The Wallflowers, Gigolo Aunts) and Chris Donohue (Dave Matthews, Patty Griffin, Lucinda Williams, Robert Plant) to bring a good dose of infectious energy and creativity to the scene. Additionally, musicians Brady Blade and Carol Isaacs — longstanding studio collaborators and live-show band members with the Girls — returned, along with the current Indigo Girls’ touring band. Isaacs contributes haunting piano parts on songs such as “Come a Long Way,” “If I Don’t Leave Here Now,” and “Fishtails,” and sonorous accordion parts to “Spread the Pain Around” and “Findlay, Ohio 1968.” Blade offers his free-wheelin’, Louisiana drumming style to “Fishtails,” “Elizabeth,” “Texas Was Clean,” and the “The Rise of The Black Messiah.” The inputs of many of the contributing musicians are captured in a series of videos by the talented Kathlyn Horan, who filmed the crew during the recording of the album. The videos are available on the Indigo Girls’ website and in them we glimpse the ferocity and attention to detail that has helped the Indigo Girls thrive through the various capitulations of a changing music industry. Starting with 2009’s Poseidon and the Bitter Bug, their eleventh studio album, the Girls formed their own label, IG Recordings, which is now distributed by Vanguard/Concord Music Group. The move aligns with their long held commitment to creative freedom, energy they’ve also devoted to various social and environmental causes.

The Indigo Girls have spent thirty-five years performing together, produced fifteen albums (seven gold, four platinum, and one double platinum), earned a Grammy and seven Grammy nominations, and have toured arenas, festivals, and clubs the world over. It is rare to find musicians together so long, rarer still with such profound successes. Their music lives in the hearts of generations of dedicated fans and continues to inspire young musicians. This loyalty is not accidental. Perhaps their relevance over three decades can be credited to the mighty collisions of distinct aesthetics forging new paths over time. The Girls’ refinement — not only of style and skill, but of their own creative processes — allows access to ever new and liminal spaces.

A long creative marriage fosters its own scrappy beauty, though, and theirs grows more nuanced, weatherworn, and lovely in each successive album. Saliers and Ray live separate lives, take on independent projects, but share “the same set of values,” says Saliers. “We both embrace the struggle, share the same energy. We are sisters in our embrace of life. Observers.” That sort of artistic kinship is rare and cosmic. Here, then, are the stars of that labor, the next chapter.

Capital Center for the Arts - Concord, NH

Nov 15

Nov 15

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

GORDON LIGHTFOOT
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES:

"50 YEARS ON THE CAREFREE HIGHWAY TOUR"

After 50 active years of hit song making and international album sales well into the multi-millions, it's safe to say that esteemed singer-songwriter and musician Gordon Lightfoot resides with some very exclusive company atop the list of all-time greats. His song catalog is incredibly vast and includes such immortals as “Early Morning Rain,” “If You Could Read My Mind,” “Carefree Highway,” “Sundown,” “(That's What You Get) For Lovin Me,” “The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald," "Cold On The Shoulder", "Canadian Railroad Trilogy," "Ribbon Of Darkness," "Beautiful," "Song For A Winter's Night", "Shadows", "Rainy Day People", "Did She Mention My Name" and "Summertime Dream to name just a few.

But this year is special for the legendary artist who has announced plans for a cross-country USA tour entitled "Gordon Lightfoot - 50 Years On The Carefree Highway". The tour will feature his well known hits as well as some deep album cuts for the die-hard fans. All of which are woven together with some of Lightfoot's own behind the scenes stories and personal anecdotes about his historic 50year musical career. The event is sure to be a great thrill for live audiences and anyone who enjoys hearing great music and seeing a living legend in person.

Gordon Lightfoot has recorded 20 albums and has five Grammy nominations. His songs have been aired regularly for 50 years, earning him Radio Singles Chart Positions in North America achieved by few others. Lightfoot's radio hits in the USA have earned Five #1s, Five Top 10s and Thirteen Top 40 hits. In Canada he has earned Sixteen #1s, Eighteen Top 10s and Twenty One Top 40 hits.

Aside from his success in writing, singing and performing his own music, Lightfoot's songs have been recorded and performed by some of the greatest of all time including: Bob Dylan, Elvis Presley, Johnny
Cash, Hank Williams, Jr., Marty Robbins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Judy Collins, Eric Clapton, Johnny Mathis, Anne Murray, Olivia Newton-John, Sarah McLachlan, Barbra Streisand, Peter Paul & Mary, Harry Belafonte, Jane’s Addiction, Richie Havens, Glen Campbell, Toby Keith, Alison Krauss and George Hamilton IV.

In June of 2012 Lightfoot's legacy was further enhanced when he was inducted into the Songwriters Hall Of Fame. Lightfoot was honored for his role in defining the folk-pop sound of the 1960s and '70s. There are fewer than 400 inductees who make up the impressive roster enshrined in the Songwriters Hall of Fame including: Burt Bacharach, John Fogerty, Bob Dylan, Carole King, Paul Simon, Billy Joel, Elton John, Brian Wilson, James Taylor, James Brown, Bruce Springsteen, Jim Croce, Phil Collins, Loretta Lynn, Van Morrison, Kris Kristofferson, Dolly Parton, Diane Warren, Garth Brooks, and Leonard Cohen.

In his native Canada, Lightfoot has been decorated with the highest honors bestowed to a civilian including the Governor's General Award and the Companion to the Order of Canada honor of merit. He has also won 17 Juno Awards - Canada's equivalent to the Grammy Awards. Gordon is a member of Canada's Walk of
Fame and The Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame. In 2007, Canada Post honored him by issuing an official
Gordon Lightfoot postage stamp. Lightfoot is also in the Canadian Music Hall of Fame and the Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame. Gordon Lightfoot is an indelible part of the Canadian national spirit and regarded as perhaps the most prolific and greatest Canadian singer-songwriter of all time.


"Lightfoot became a mentor for a long time. I think he probably still is to this day. I can't think of any Gordon Lightfoot song I don't like. Every time I hear a song of his, I wish it would last forever. "
- Bob Dylan

"Gordon Lightfoot has created some of the most beautiful and lasting music of our time. He is Bob Dylan's favorite singer/songwriter - high praise from the best of us, applauded by the rest of us."
- Kris Kristofferson

"I've always been trying to write songs like Lightfoot. A song of mine like 'Come
Monday' is a direct result of me trying to write a Gordon Lightfoot song."
- Jimmy Buffett

"Canadian Railroad Trilogy is an extremely fine piece of songwriting. "
- Johnny Cash

The Hangar Theatre - Ithaca, NY

Nov 17

Nov 17

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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Colin Hay is familiar to millions as the frontman, songwriter, and vocalist of pop sensation Men at Work (“Down Under,” “Overkill,” “Who Can it Be Now?”). Hay is justifiably proud of his place in pop history, but since moving to Los Angeles in 1989, he’s made 11 critically-acclaimed solo albums, including the highly successful Man at Work, and has recently announced the release of his new album Next Year People on Compass Records.

Next Year People is the work of an artist who is a true master of his craft. The album is full of quizzical, curious, and cynical yet open-hearted songs with catchy melodic hooks that underscore deeply insightful lyrics.

The album was produced by Hay and mixed by Chad Fischer (Chasing Mavericks, Ice Age 3, Lisa Loeb) and includes contributions from two young Cuban musicians, San Miguel Perez and Yosmel Montejo, both of whom recently emigrated from Havana, as well Larry Goldings on piano, Jeff Babko (Jimmy Kimmel) on B3, and Colin's wife, vocalist Cecilia Noel.

Over the past 15 years Hay has reinvented himself as a solo artist, regularly selling out theaters and listening rooms across the US and around the world and introducing himself to a new generation of fans in the process. “I started off playing acoustic; it’s my natural game, if you will,” he concludes. “It’s the point I started from and may well be the point I end with. It’s always what I return to.”

The frequent use of Hay’s music in TV and film—including hit shows such as Scrubs (on which he has made several cameo appearances) Army Wives and Modern Family, the hit soundtrack to the film Garden State and the recently released Words and Pictures—has proven the timeless appeal of his songs.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Nov 20

Nov 20

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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“I told Swift that our last two records took a year each to make,” laughs Guster’s Ryan Miller. “He told me he’d never spent more than nine days on an album.” The band and producer got together anyway and the result is Evermotion, an album of raw acid-soaked chamber pop, and a stylistic departure that no one saw coming. Guster sought out Shins keyboardist/Black Keys bassist Richard Swift based on his work with Damien Jurado and Foxygen, giving themselves over to the full experience of recording at Swift’s Cottage Grove, Oregon studio for three weeks in January 2014. “It wasn’t hard to figure out where we overlapped with Swift,” adds percussionist/drummer Brian Rosenworcel. “It was just a matter of trusting ourselves to go big and commit. Richard is the type of artist that’s always standing back and taking in the whole canvas.” With a new looseness and swagger, Guster pushes the acoustic guitars into the background, instead exploring deeper drum grooves, keyboard textures and atmospheric noise -- a language they shared easily with Swift. The band that emerged from this session sounds like one that is no longer evolving, but has evolved into something else entirely. "Richard helped us figure out what was important about recording," says guitarist Adam Gardner. "We had just one microphone over the drum kit, used whole takes, didn't obsess over vocals or really edit things at all -- it's a raw version of our band, mistakes and all, that feels more relevant. He helped us tremendously with the big picture." Evermotion’s first single, the infectious “Simple Machine,” has been hailed by TIME magazine for its “frantic beats and crawling synthesizers.” The chiming lullaby of “Long Night” with its aching Ryan Miller falsetto, the shimmering “Endlessly,” the distorted steel drums and Bacharach melody of “Doin’ It by Myself,” the a cappella Beach Boys harmonies in the gently breezy “Lazy Love,” the dream-pop of “Expectation,” the British Invasion beat of “Gangway,” the woozy trombones and whistling of “Never Coming Down” and the Beatle-esque psychedelia of “It Is Just What It Is” shows Guster is still learning new tricks. Since forming at Tufts University in 1992, Guster has become one of the leading indie/alternative bands, releasing seven critically acclaimed albums in 20 years, starting with Parachute in 1995. Evermotion (to be released on their own Ocho Mule label through Nettwerk Records) is the follow-up to 2010’s Easy Wonderful, which earned the band its highest-ever chart debut on the Billboard 200 at #22, while reaching #2 on both the SoundScan Alternative and iTunes charts. On Evermotion, Guster’s acoustic roots are buried deep beneath the surface, almost impossible to detect, even though every song has, at its heart, an indelible melody and more than its share of tight, lethal hooks that catch and hold. The 2010 addition of multi-instrumentalist Luke Reynolds to the core group of founding members Miller, Gardner and Rosenworcel, added immeasurably to Guster’s expanding musical palette. Evermotion marks the first time that Reynolds joined for the preproduction and writing process, which took place in Rosenworcel's Brooklyn basement over 2012 and 2013. Reynolds' stamp is clear and his passion is all over the record, from his guitar melodies on "Lazy Love" to his fuzz bass on "Doin' It By Myself." Guster’s songs remain packed with hummable choruses and dense lyrical detail amid the muscular guitar riffs, clanging percussion and deceptively dark lyrics. The new album features adventurous turns on slide guitars, brassy trumpets and even a glockenspiel, with sax and trombone accompaniment by Jon Natchez, whose stints with the War on Drugs, Beirut, Passion Pit and others have led NPR to call him “indie rock’s most valuable sideman.” From the start of the album, it's clear that this is a renewed band with a bolstered purpose, a band on their own vector. Evermotion introduces you to a Guster that is free, not calculated, seasoned but loose, confident in re-shaping their legacy.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Dec 3

Dec 3

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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The Hurry and The Harm “I just wanted to make an honest record.” So says Dallas Green, otherwise known as City and Colour. He’s not really talking about confessionals (though that might happen, too) but truthfully incarnated music: organic songwriting, natural process and sincere moments captured in the studio. Captured—not manipulated. For his fourth LP, The Hurry and The Harm, Green not only wanted to present an honest album, but an honest version of himself. To do so, he had to leave some things behind, confront others and let the rest simmer. Green wasn’t quite prepared to make another album so soon. On tour to support his last album, Little Hell (2011), he couldn’t quite shake the feeling that something was unbalanced, uneasy. “I was being pulled in two different directions,” Green recalls. He was mentally near the end of the road with his former band, Alexisonfire, but couldn’t yet share the news with his fans. “I wanted to be in one place, but I didn’t want to let my friends down.” He started reading poetry— specifically the Kentucky-born author Wendell Berry, and his work “The Peace of Wild Things.” “I come into the peace of wild things, who do not tax their lives with forethought of grief. I come into the presence of still water,” it goes. Those lines made Green “excited about words again,” and comforted him in a time when things didn’t seem too peaceful. The songs came—quickly, even. It’s no surprise, really. City and Colour’s music is exactly that: peace, in wild things. There’s a calm, dulcet tone to the songs, the melodies crafted to provide restlessness amidst a sonically complex journey that both soothes and rustles. The record’s first leaked track, “Of Space and Time,” showcases Green’s voice as it dangles in his own special kind of falsetto, set to a chugging drumbeat and subtle strum. “I’m roaming through the hills all alone,” he sings. “I’m trying to find my direction home.” Maybe he didn’t know it at the time, but home is City and Colour—it’s not simply a “solo” project from an otherwise accounted-for band member, but is Green, his primary entity, and his honesty. The Hurry and The Harm is the first City and Colour album recorded outside of Canada—Green took his process this time to Nashville, Tennessee’s Blackbird Studios. “I’ve never gone anywhere else to make a record,” Green recalls. “I think it worked out, and it was a wonderful experience.” He recruited an excellent team of players to round out the songs, including Jack Lawrence on bass (The Raconteurs, The Dead Weather), Bo Koster on keys (My Morning Jacket), Spencer Cullum (Caitlin Rose) on pedal steel and both Matt Chamberlain (Pearl Jam, Fiona Apple) and James Gadson (Bill Withers, BB King) on drums. Green once again found great kinship in producer Alex Newport, who has worked with such varied and dynamic artists as At The Drive-In, Death Cab for Cutie, Bloc Party and The Mars Votla (and more notably with Green on Little Hell). The resulting album is a journey through a state of mind, exploring everything from Green’s struggles to leave his previous band (“Of Space and Time”) to his distaste for gossip media (“Commentators”). Musically, the artful evolution can be felt in the crushing, sweeping rush of the first single, “Thirst,” with its aggressive vamp and both acid instrumentals and tongue: “after I’m gone / once I finally leave / you will be left alone to the wolves and the thieves.” There is a longing in the words but a certain direction in the songs, such as on “Two Coins” which balances a quiet folkiness with an unexpected guitar solo, searching through the play in his voice and the introspection of the ironically upbeat strums of “Harder Than Stone.” “Lyrically, now that I look back at the record as a whole, there are a lot of songs that deal with me searching for something,” he says. “And I know now that I wrote those songs near the end of Alexisonfire.” “I don’t have a lot of faith in myself, so it is hard for me to have a lot of faith in something I have created,” Green says. “But I’ve never been happier or prouder about something that I have done.” Green began recording as City and Colour in 2005, with Sometimes, followed by 2008’s Bring Me Your Love and 2011’s Little Hell and has experienced huge success both on the charts and the road. All three previous studio albums have achieved platinum status in Canada, while Little Hell is also now Gold in Australia. Additionally, Little Hell debuted at #1 on Canada’s Top 200 Chart, #28 in the U.S., #2 in Australia and top 40 in the U.K. Moreover, almost every show in 2011 and 2012 sold out (including the famed Royal Albert Hall, a two night stay at the Roundhouse in London and New York’s Terminal 5). In support of The Hurry and The Harm, City and Colour will once again embark on a wide-ranging set of dates across North American and the world. The tour will feature a brand new touring band including Jack Lawrence (The Raconteurs, Dead Weather) on bass, Dante Schwebel (Hacienda, Dan Auerbach) on guitar, Doug MacGregor (Constantines) on drums and Matt Kelly on pedal steel guitar and keys. Playing guitar since age eight and crafting songs since his teenage years, Green has always known he wanted to write music and sing: mostly for himself, to find peace and clarity amongst the chaos. He thinks it’s kismet that others happen to like to listen. “At the end of the day, when I write a song, it has to make me happy,” he says. “I have to want to sing it again. And then the hope after that is that somebody else will like it.” And they do, because it’s the peace of wild things.

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

Dec 10

Dec 10

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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“We sound possessed on these songs,” says guitarist/vocalist Carrie Brownstein about Sleater-Kinney’s eighth studio album, No Cities To Love. “Willing it all—the entire weight of the band and what it means to us—back into existence.” The new record is the first in 10 years from the acclaimed trio—Brownstein, vocalist/guitarist Corin Tucker, and drummer Janet Weiss—who came crashing out of the ‘90s Pacific Northwest riot grrrl scene, setting a new bar for punk’s political insight and emotional impact. Formed in Olympia, WA in 1994, Sleater-Kinney were hailed as “America’s best rock band” by Greil Marcus in Time Magazine, and put out seven searing albums in 10 years before going on indefinite hiatus in 2006. But the new album isn’t about reminiscing, it’s about reinvention—the ignition of an unparalleled chemistry to create new sounds and tell new stories. “I always considered Corin and Carrie to be musical soulmates in the tradition of the greats,” says Weiss, whose drums fuel the fire of Tucker and Brownstein’s vocal and guitar interplay. “Something about taking a break brought them closer, desperate to reach together again for their true expression.” The result is a record that grapples with love, power and redemption without restraint. “The three of us want the same thing,” says Weiss. “We want the songs to be daunting.” Produced by long-time Sleater-Kinney collaborator John Goodmanson, who helmed many of the band’s earlier albums including 1997 breakout set Dig Me Out, No Cities To Love is indeed formidable from the first beat. Lead track “Price Tag” is a pounding anthem about greed and the human cost of capitalism, establishing both the album’s melodic drive and its themes of power and powerlessness—giving voice, as Tucker says, to those who “struggle to be heard against the dominant culture or status quo.” “Bury Our Friends” has Tucker and Brownstein joining vocal forces, locking arms to defeat a pressing fear of insignificance. It’s also emblematic of the band’s give and take, and commitment to working and reworking each song until it’s as strong as it can be. “‘Bury Our Friends’ was written in the 11th hour,” says Tucker. “Carrie had her great chime-y guitar riff, but we had gone around in circles with how to make that part into a cohesive song. I think Carrie finally cracked the chorus idea and yelled, ‘Sing with me!’” “A New Wave” similarly went through many iterations during the writing process, with five or six potential choruses, before crystallizing. It enters with an insistent guitar riff, and a battle between acceptance and defiance—“Every day I throw a little party,” howls Brownstein, “but a fit would be more fitting.” The album’s meditative title track was inspired by the trend of atomic tourism and its function as a metaphor for someone enthralled and impressed by power. “That form of power, that presence, is not only destructive it’s also hollowed-out, past its prime,” says Brownstein. “The character in that song has made a ritual out of seeking structures and people in which to find strength, yet they keep coming up empty.” Sleater-Kinney’s decade apart made room for family and other fruitful collaborations, as well as an understanding of what the band’s singular chemistry demands. “Creativity is about where you want your blood to flow, because in order to do something meaningful and powerful there has to be life inside of it,” says Brownstein. “Sleater-Kinney isn’t something you can do half-assed or half-heartedly. We have to really want it. This band requires a certain desperation, a direness. We have to be willing to push because the entity that is this band will push right back.” “The core of this record is our relationship to each other, to the music, and how all of us still felt strongly enough to about those to sweat it out in the basement and to try and reinvent our band,” adds Tucker. With No Cities To Love,” we went for the jugular.”

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Jan 29

Jan 29

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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Get The Led Out is a group of professional musicians who are passionate about their love of the music of Led Zeppelin. It's been their mission to bring the studio recordings of "the mighty Zep" to life on the big concert stage. This is not an impersonator act but rather a group of musicians who were fans first, striving to do justice to one of the greatest bands in rock history!

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Feb 20

Feb 20

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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“It is brilliant and quietly addictive” – The London Guardian

“New York’s hottest and hippest literary ticket” – The Wall Street Journal

The Moth is an acclaimed not-for-profit organization dedicated to the art and craft of storytelling. It is a celebration of both the raconteur, who breathes fire into true tales of ordinary life, and the storytelling novice, who has lived through something extraordinary and yearns to share it. At the center of each performance is, of course, the story – and The Moth’s directors work with each storyteller to find, shape and present it.

Since its launch in 1997, The Moth has presented thousands of stories, told live and without notes, to standing-room-only crowds worldwide.

Moth shows are renowned for the great range of human experience they showcase. Each show starts with a theme, and the storytellers explore it, often in unexpected ways. Since each story is true and every voice authentic, the shows dance between documentary and theater, creating a unique, intimate, and often enlightening experience for the audience.

Moth stories dissolve socio-economic barriers, expose vulnerabilities, and quietly suggest ways to overcome challenges and see with new eyes.

The Moth Mainstage is our flagship program and features stories by luminaries in the arts and sciences, newsmakers and news breakers, and everyday heroes (and even a few reformed villains!). Each show features five storytellers who develop and shape their stories with The Moth’s directors. Beyond a mere theatrical experience, The Moth is an ever-growing community where entertainment, enlightenment and festivity merge.

The Moth Mainstage is a staple of the literary and art scenes in New York City and Los Angeles, but also tours throughout the United States and abroad. On the road, favorite storytellers from past Moth shows share the stage with local voices.

- Upcoming Highlights -

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- Spotlight Artists -

- Just Announced -

Aug 21

The Smith Opera House - Geneva , NY

Sep 17

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Oct 6

Academy of Music - Northampton, MA

Oct 8

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Oct 9

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Oct 15

Memorial Auditorium - Burlington, VT

Oct 21

College Street Music Hall. - New Haven, CT

Oct 23

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Banditos

- Social Updates -

Drumroll, please? @jacobezzo is the lucky winner of our #signed Old Crow Medicine Show with Sturgill Simpson #limited #screened #poster contest!!! Congrats man, hope you enjoyed the show! @justinecole86 wins our #special signed The Decemberists with Lucius screened poster :) Glad you had a great time! Thanks for entering everyone- join us again next time for your chance to win some #dsp2015 #ommegang swag!

What an awesome weekend! Thanks so much to Lucius and The Decemberists - you know how to put on an awesome act! As always, Ommegang crew - you're the best. Next up, Bonnie Raitt, Primus and Dinosaur Jr. What a summer lineup!!!

Guster - "Satellite" - (Stop Motion)

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http://www.singalongpaul.com Official music video for Guster's "Satellite". Watch the making-of footage here! - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1c_ijA88-9Q Ar...

We are THRILLED to be bringing Guster to the State Theatre of Ithaca on November 20th!! Even cooler- they'll be searching for local high school and college bands to open for them! More info here: http://smarturl.it/GusterOpen :) Presaless start TOMORROW, tickets ON SALE FRIDAY! :) Get 'em quick! #DSP2015

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P.O. BOX 736
Ithaca, NY 14851