EVENTS

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with The Falconers & Sammus

Dec 27

Dec 27

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $10-$15

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian


This all original, female-fronted, five-piece moxy rock band from Ithaca, NY is driving hard at bigger things and has been busy building an airtight justification for all the buzz surrounding it, both in its hometown and throughout the region. The band gets better and better, with its solid-as-a-rock rhythm section, eclectic library of vintage keyboard sounds, bold and inventive electric guitar stylings, electrifying lead vocals from force of nature Maddy Walsh who continues to reach new heights at every show, and uplifting, infectious songs that leave audiences humming. The group has matured at an incredible rate, but its members all attest that the recent recognition they’ve garnered comes not from luck but from some seriously hard work. “We put in have a lot of hours together,” says lead guitarist and co-founder Mike Suave. “We’re lucky to have a group of such dedicated people working toward a common goal and all thinking about the future.” It’s the dedication to consistently writing new material and rehearsing it and the shared love of the music the band members make together that continues to propel The Blind Spots forward and set them apart. Since the release of their debut album, El Camino Dream [2010] and their followup EP, Small Stampede [2012], both tight and inspired collections that showcase the band’s energy and expansive creativity, The Blind Spots have played a handful of the northeast’s well-renowned clubs and have been invited to play at a number of summer festivals, including the Finger Lakes GrassRoots Festival of Music and Dance, Sterling Stage Folkfest, as well as at many colleges, including Cornell University, the University of Vermont, SUNY Brockport, and Elmira College to name a few. The band plans to embark on a much more rigorous touring schedule this fall. In a musical-minded town like Ithaca, virtually teeming with talented artists, The Blind Spots have really had to earn their notoriety. “It’s a great place to come from if you’re a serious musician,” says Walsh. “It’s a good training ground.” Ithaca serves now as a supportive springboard that allows The Blind Spots to catapult into new regions, and they plan to continue expanding their radius. The band is set to release their third album produced at Alex Perialas’s world class Pyramid Sound Studios with drummer, engineer, and producer Mike Parker at the helm. Keep an eye on The Blind Spots, as they are on their way to winning the hearts of new devotees.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

**Jimkata/Hotel Ithaca NYE Room Special: Need a hotel room for the night of the show?? Call The Hotel Ithaca (www.thehotelithaca.com - 607.272.1000) and mention Jimkata at The Haunt to receive a special rate!! A room with two queen beds is just $79.**

Dec 31

Dec 31

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $20-$25

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Jimkata’s innovative, fan-funded record Die Digital turned the heads of critics and musicians when it dropped in the Fall of 2012, solidifying the band’s reputation as forward-thinking artists to pay attention to. Jimkata’s refined electro-rock sound is one of a band that has found its voice after years of experimentation; It’s more indie rock than jam, and more 90′s electronica than modern day EDM; yet the five-piece appeals to each of these audiences. In the spirit of LCD Soundsystem, MGMT and Talking Heads, Jimkata’s relevant, quotable lyrics create moods not just for fleeting moments, but for the lifestyle of an entire generation. Following the release of their first live record 10 More Songs! (2013), Jimkata is poised to unveil their third studio EP and sixth official release Feel In Light on 3.4.14. Recorded with Die Digital producer Jocko Randall at his MoreSound Studios in Syracuse, NY Feel In Light represents the continued evolution of this modern rock band’s sound - one which will be simpler in essence – exploring themes of love, triumph and appreciating second chances in life. A staple of the festival circuit from the Rockies to the Atlantic, Jimkata’s 2013 schedule included heavy hitters like Gathering of The Vibes, Summer Camp, Catskill Chill and Rootwire, on top of hosting their very own inaugural festival, Katalyst. Fans can catch the band this winter on their extensive national tour taking them up and down the east coast and to Colorado.

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

with Black Castle

Dec 31

Dec 31

Doors open at 9:00 pm Starts at 10:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $17-$20

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Since their inception over 10 years ago, the Sim Redmond Band has been steadily on the rise, forging new ground in roots music. Traveling around the globe, playing with the likes of moe., the Neville Brothers, the Wailers, Jimmy Cliff, and Habib Koite, in some of the most beautiful venues in the U.S. and Japan, the world has taken notice. With 6 tours of Japan under their belt, SRB's unique blend of roots-rock, Afro-Carribean, and reggae music continues to spread like wild fire. They are based in Ithaca, NY but their magnetic pole is Africa, particularly the sounds eminating from West & South Africa. This magnetic pole has served as a pivot for the Sim Redmond Band to spring into straight rock grooves and pumping reggae. The vocal teamwork of Sim Redmond, Jen Middaugh, and Nate Silas Richardson creates some of the richest harmonies you'll ever hear.

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

with Pearl and the Beard

Jan 25

Jan 25

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $12-$15

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Fiercely independent road warriors Wild Child, an “indie powerhouse,” has spent the past year stepping into that spotlight, playing stages as major as Austin City Limits Music Festival, Wakarusa, Firefly Music Festival, Bonnaroo, Osheaga, and Savannah Stopover. Behind their second album, The Runaround, the premiere release on Ben Kweller’s Noise Company label, the Austin six piece earned NPR’s Top Ten Songs of 2013 honors for the song “Living Tree,” and saw five additional songs hit number 1 on Hype Machine’s Popular chart. Their Spotify, Soundcloud, and YouTube streams have eclipsed ten million listens, and they’ve appeared on NPR’s World Cafe and an airing of eTown Radio. The lead single from The Runaround, “Crazy Bird,” debuted on Specialty Radio at number one fueled by an electrifying performance on The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson. Together since 2010, the band has been hailed as one of the top acts in music-rich Austin since the release of debut album Pillow Talk; their mix of folk, pop, and gypsy melodies make them sound like little else. Kelsey Wilson has “the voice of a Jazz Age Broadway baby,” writes NPR, “all coos and hiccups and shivers.” Among unanimously illustrious praise from the likes of Paste Magazine, Relix Magazine, The Chicago Tribune, Indie Shuffle, The Austin Chronicle, and American Songwriter, the Austin American­Statesman has anointed Wild Child as “Austin’s next national breakout act.” Countless sold-out shows across the US suggest that that foretold future may in fact already be upon us. Incorporating violin, ukulele, cello, piano, bass, banjo, and horns in ways that few bands could conceive of today, Wild Child has broken through as one of the preeminent bands in one of the most storied music cities in the world, winning back-to-back honors as the city’s Best Indie Band at the Austin Music Awards. “Music defines us,” says Wild Child’s co-frontman Alexander Beggins. “We get up every day to stomp, clap, whoop, holler, and dance with our family on stage and our friends in the crowd. We’re always looking for ways to expand our sound and push our boundaries musically, and we’re always looking for the next thing, the next sound, the next song. But in the meantime, it just blows our mind to stand on stage and look out into the crowd and see people singing along.”

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Thousands of One

Feb 6

Feb 6

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $12-$15

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian


 


The well-worn and often overblown expression “music is a common language” has never been more apropos in the case of Joe Driscoll & Sekou Kouyate. US-born, England-based Driscoll speaks no French and Kouyate, who hails from the West African country of Guinea, little English. When they were brought together at the Nuit Metis (Mixed Night) festival in Marseille, France in 2010 and given a week to produce a concert, music was the only way they could communicate. It turns out, they had a lot to “talk” about, and their first meeting sparked a collaboration that led to the formation of a band, the recording of an album, over 120 concert dates across Europe and rave reviews. Driscoll contributes the rapping, looping, beatboxing and songwriting talents he developed growing up in Syracuse, New York and during his own successful recording career. Kouyate, already a phenomenon in African music circles, has blown minds and ears with his hypersonic electrified riffs on the kora, bringing the exalted West African harp into the 21st Century with use of distortion peddles, effects and previously-unimagined technical prowess. Together, Driscoll and Kouyate blend hip-hop, spoken word, funk, and soulful, accessible rock with Afrobeat, reggae and irrepressible African grooves. Sekou Kouyate was raised in a respected and accomplished musical family in Conakry, Guinea. Trained in the ancient traditions of his instrument, it is his ability to transcend and build upon those traditions that has set him apart. In France, he is known as the ‘Jimi Hendrix of the kora’ because of his unique style of playing with various effects, in a variety of genres, and with an extreme intensity. Kouyate has toured the world over as a member of the Ba Cissoko band, comprised of his cousin and brothers. Joe Driscoll, whom Cee-Lo Green labelled “the gangsta with an iron lung,” has been touring steadily for years, spreading his unique fusion of folk and hip-hop. The modern day take on the one man band, he uses live looping to create soundscapes full of beatbox, guitar, harmonica, percussion, harmonica, and just about anything else he can make use of. Now living in Bristol, England, Driscoll has performed his ground breaking solo show at the famed Glastonbury Festival, Electric Picnic in Ireland, and hundreds of major stages worldwide. By teaming up, Driscoll and Kouyate have created a sum that exceeds even the large whole of its individual parts. According to Driscoll, “We’ve been raised in very different cultures in so many ways, but we share a lot of the same interests musically. Sekou was raised in the African rhythm and traditions, yet has always had a passion for reggae, hip-hop. I’m kind of the other way around. At the heart of it, we both just make the noises we love; we listen to each other, and try to flow in harmony. I think we just bounced off each other in so many ways: rhythmically, melodically, with craftsmanship. Through this, we found we had a language between us and that philosophically we were on a lot of the same pages as well.” With plans already in the works to record a follow-up album, Joe Driscoll and Sekou Kouyate have discovered that music speaks louder than words.

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

Feb 6

Feb 6

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $12-$15

Event Information

After 5 years, 400+ shows, and four award-winning albums, New Jersey-based 21 year-old singer/songwriter Quincy Mumford released his 5th album “Its Only Change” in July 2013. Its Only Change was recorded in Nashville, TN with producer Ken Coomer (Wilco, Uncle Tupelo) and features performances from Jerry Roe (K.D. Lang), David Labruyere (John Mayer) and Aubrey Freed (Black Crowes, Sheryl Crow). Producer Ken Coomer, states, “Quincy Mumford is a true artist that can bring raw 70′s style rock and funk highlighted with the voice of an old soul, it’s a perfect blend.” Its Only Change displays many different emotions and musical styling’s including rock, soul, jazz, funk and hip-hop. States Quincy, “This record is like nothing I have ever done before. For the first time, I was able to mesh all of my influences into one complete piece of work.” Several different life changing experiences during the past year have provided Quincy with an array of lyrical content to complement the expansive sonic approach to Its Only Change. Its Only Change opens with “Change”, the final song written for the album completed during pre-production in Nashville with Coomer. The album title draws from the song name and speaks towards a new musical direction for Quincy and the band. “Time Won’t Wait” explores a young man’s struggle with accepting reality and features an emotionally charged refrain with heavy jazz/R&B inspired verses. “Under the Covers” funky bass and driving drum beat draw the listener in and “Eventually”, an introspective ballad, speaks to a need for a simpler life. “A Hard Place”, the first single on the album, is a bouncy, energetic reggae inspired metaphor for feeling small in this world. Quincy Mumford & The Reason Why’s 2012 release “Live At The Saint” captures the band’s live sound featuring songs from Quincy’s three previous studio albums. Quincy states, “after recording Live at the Saint, I was ready to take on a new challenge” as evidenced on Its Only Change. The Live at The Saint DVD includes footage from the concert shot on multiple cameras, interviews with the band, scenic cinematography and a documentary featuring Quincy and the band members’ musical getaway and adventures in the mountains of Vermont. The film was directed, edited, and filmed by Quincy’s award winning brother, Kyle Mumford, and his Lifted Pictures’ film crew. Quincy and The Reason Why are excited to continue their tireless performance schedule and are set to headline a 6-week US tour in the summer of 2014 playing over 40 shows from June 28th to August 10th. Mumford’s previous tours which has found him sharing the stage with Slightly Stoopid, Rusted Root, moe., Donovan Frankenreiter, Tedeschi Trucks Band and performing at major music festivals The Gathering of the Vibes and Musikfest. Quincy and the band also volunteer their time for The Surfrider Foundation and hold other environmental causes close to their collective hearts. Optimistic, charismatic, and undeniably genuine, Quincy’s music possesses the same “feel good” attitude that the young man himself does. Its Only Change establishes Quincy Mumford and The Reason Why as a “Band to Watch” in 2014.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Mount Carmel

Feb 7

Feb 7

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $10-$13

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian


Unexplained phenomena of all kinds can be attributed to magic. Music is among those marvels. When a group of unrelated individuals of different backgrounds gets together and locks into a sonic unity, there must be some sort of mysticism at work. That’s the only way to properly explain it. The members of Nashville’s All Them Witches would agree too. That energy even courses through their moniker, which unsurprisingly comes from Roman Polanski’s 1968 masterpiece Rosemary’s Baby. “The name can be interpreted in many different ways,” explains singer and bassist Michael Parks, Jr. “It could be a person’s view on what the forces of good and evil are or even how we interact with each other as human beings. There’s a little bit of witchcraft in everybody’s life. Just waking up is pretty magical—you’re alive another day. In terms of the music, we’re so loose, and that’s where the magic comes from. There’s no controlling factor. We do exactly what comes naturally. We go in a room without any idea about what will happen, get in the groove, and it works. That’s supernatural.” All Them Witches began conjuring up music together in 2012. Foregoing theater school to focus on songwriting, Parks traded New Mexico for Nashville at 19-years-old. The Shreveport, Louisiana native met drummer Robby Staebler while the two shared a shift at a “corporate hippie store”. Robby showed Parks some music he and guitarist Ben McLeod had written, and it inspired the singer to jam—which he adds, “I usually never do. It made sense though”. Adding Robby’s longtime friend Allan Van Cleave to the fold on Fender Rhodes, All Them Witches cut their debut Our Mother Electricity. Almost immediately after, they began working on its follow-up 2013’s Lightning At The Door. Recorded live in a matter of days with producer and engineer Andy Putnam, the boys tapped into a distinct energy, mustering bluesy soul, Southern swagger, and thunderous hard rock all at once. “We tracked everything live in the same room,” says Parks. “We got a lot of bleed from the mics and the amps being together. Everything felt organic. You get us untainted on the record.” The first single “When God Comes Back” swings from a Delta-dipped groove into a striking riff juxtaposed with Parks’ transfixing delivery. It’s as hypnotic as it is heavy. “Sometimes, I get visions, for lack of a better word, that lead to songs,” the frontman admits. “I’ll be doing a mundane task at work, walking somewhere in the woods, or driving, and I’ll get these narrative flashes in my head. Personal experiences play into those narratives. This song is about our egos coming to break us down and destroy everything. We try to govern each other and turn the only landscape we have to live in into a parking lot. There’s no room for anybody. So, when God comes back, he’s going to be really mad.” Elsewhere on the album, one story connects the expansive and entrancing “The Marriage of Coyote Woman” and “The Death of Coyote Woman”. The tracks twirl through rustic instrumentation and muscular distortion before building into a wild climax. “It’s a two-part song that follows one character in my brain that has its own trials and tribulations to go through,” Parks goes on. “It also discusses how and where I grew up. It’s a hodgepodge, and the lyrics and music just came to me while I was driving.” Given their powerful and potent psychedelic sound, All Them Witches has shared the stage with everybody from punk luminaries Broncho to the buzzing Windhand. They’ve also rocked at WRLT's weekly live series "Nashville Sunset", played the station's Live On The Green and appeared at the Scion Rock Fest. “We can take so many different paths,” he adds. “The music is ever-shifting. None of us grew up listening to the same music. In Louisiana, I heard a lot of ZZ Top and Blues band. Allan was raised on classical, almost exclusively. Robby and Ben listened to a ton of Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin. When we came together, it simply works.” Ultimately, everything comes back to that certain magic for All Them Witches. “Not to sound too much like hippie, but I hope everybody can ride our vibe,” Parks leaves off. “We’re very simple people doing something we really love. We have such a short amount of time on this earth. Everybody should be doing what they love. If there’s a message here, it’s that.”

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Feb 10

Feb 10

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

The New Pornographers' sixth album, Brill Bruisers, has a name that brings multiple connotations to mind, all of them apt, since band founder A.C. Newman acknowledges liking "titles that, in my mind, could have five different meanings." But you wouldn't steer yourself wrong if you gathered from the name that what you are about to hear will be both brainy and pugilistic. If you could put a face on an album title, this one might be represented by a boxer's mug with a monocle. A reference to "brilliant bruisers" occurs in what became the title track, "and it was shortening it to 'brill' which made me think of the whole Brill Building connotation," Newman says. "Even though I hesitate to give it any exact meaning, I like the idea that it's bruising songs in the style of the Brill Building," the legendary office tower where the greatest pop songwriters of the 1960s pumped out their classics. "Or, it makes sense as just short for brilliant. The whole idea of being a brilliant bruiser–isn't that what everybody ultimately strives for, or what a person needs to succeed in this world? To be really intelligent and really strong at the same time? It just seemed to match this group of songs somehow." This is a set of bruisers four years in the making, as several of the collective's more prominent members have been otherwise occupied by their day jobs, or moonlighting. Newman issued a solo album last year, while Dan Bejar found acclaim with another record with his other band, Destroyer; Neko Case was doing her usual under-her-own-name world conquering. Yet the promise of New Pornography continues to bring these disparate talents together just as it has since the first album they made back in 2000, Mass Romantic–a then-lark that now shows up on so many lists of the best albums of the 20th century, it borders on counting as classic rock. Newman has learned to not resist the terms that writers have always applied to the Pornographers to reflect the unusual nature of the lineup. "The irony is that as the years go on, these things become less true and more true," he laughs. "We weren't a 'supergroup' at the beginning, but now we arguably are. The band means different things for different people. For Dan and Neko, it's a side project. For me, ironically, it's a career, and my solo career is just something I dabble in. But who else has all these people in the band? Look at us. When you consider that Neko's as popular as she's ever been and Dan's coming off Kaputt, the biggest Destroyer record yet, it's like: Yeah, we're a fucking supergroup!" Mantle accepted. On Brill Bruisers, bassist/producer John Collins returns to the co-pilot's chair that he inhabited on the Pornographers' first three albums. The band's last couple of recordings, made without Collins as primary producer, had slowed down a bit from their original indie-power-pop ethos, and Newman's latest solo album went for "a Glen Campbell vibe." Having gotten the singer/songwriter stuff somewhat out of his system, Newman decreed early in the going that this Pornographers album needed to be "shinier and faster." To that end, a couple of very specific touchstones were invoked. "Before we started the record, I was talking to Dan and I remember saying, 'Yeah, I want to go with a slight Sigue Sigue Sputnik vibe.' I think he took me very literally on that," Newman chuckles. "So he sped up all of his songs quite a bit. And I had to speed up my songs as well, because I thought 'My songs can't be slow when his are so fast!' So that Sigue Sigue Sputnik comment really served its purpose." That covers the "faster" part, but what about the "shinier"? "We were going for 'Xanadu'," Newman says. Just in case there's any doubt, he is not alluding to Citizen Kane but directly referencing, yes, the roller-disco movie to which ELO contributed much of the soundtrack. Brill Bruisers doesn't just draw inspiration from Jeff Lynne's genius in general but from the synth sounds of a very specific two- or three-year period in that group's career. "It's basically Discovery, Xanadu, Electric Dreams ELO pretty much," he allows. "There are a lot of influences that I try and avoid when they come up, but that's not one of them. If something sounds like ELO, I think, yes, let's do this! It feels like everybody's influenced by the same bands nowadays, but if you're going to be influenced by early Depeche Mode, why not just move over and be influenced by early '80s ELO?" But maybe think Secret Messages meets Surfer Rosa, because there's a deep and propulsive core almost constantly thundering away under those celestial flourishes. "On this record, I think what we wanted to do was bridge the gap between a sort of late '70s/early '80s ELO synth-pop and just being a rock band. I thought, why can't we have these arpeggiators swirling but at the same time be a driving rock band with loud guitars? That was one spot where I felt: this is a space that we can currently inhabit in rock music, because there's nobody else doing this." It wasn't just a matter of picking up vintage keyboard sounds, but also using all the modern technology and apps at their disposal. "Not that we're trying to make EDM, but we've never been afraid to use as much modern technology as possible. So there are a lot of loud sections in songs like "Champions of Red Wine" and "Dance Hall Domine" that have very chopped-up sounds. I think of taking a sample of a men's choir and chopping it up with a square-wave tremolo... and really embracing the artificiality of those sounds. But at the heart of it, there's nothing artificial about the band that's playing it. It's real bass, real drums, real guitars." And real sentiments. Newman didn't necessarily want to get as introspective on Brill Bruisers as he was on his last solo album, 2012's Shut Down the Streets, where he dealt with the death of his mother and birth of his son. But personal concerns inevitably snuck in anyhow. "Wide Eyes" is "definitely a song about my son. Though it's not sung in a very, very literal way, that song is about how he changed my life." "Fantasy Fools" also deals with the transition from young man to family man. "Not that I feel like an old man, but you can't help, when you get in your 40s and all of a sudden you have a family, to start thinking about whether there are ways of growing older correctly." Newman was able to keep a work/family balance by making most of the album over a period of two years at his home studio in Woodstock, with Collins frequently flying in for long stays to work on the production as a duo, much as they did when they made the first three albums in the band's original home base of Vancouver. A certain amount of travel still figured in, "chasing Neko around" to Texas and Vermont, and heading back to Canada for much of the work involving the three songs written and sung by Bejar as well as contributions from drummer Kurt Dahle. The result, arrived at with some sense of leisure to get it right, "is stylistically as close as we can get to what I think I've always imagined us being," says Newman. I feel like what we did on this has always been in the back of my mind, even from the first record, but we just never did it, like using all the arpeggiators and adding that spacy synth element. It just never seemed right before, and with this record, it completely did. I feel more confident about this record than I've ever felt about anything before. My reaction to somebody not liking this record is 'Well, I don't know what else to do!'"

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Feb 13

Feb 13

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $20-$25

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian


One of the fathers of "prop comedy," Gallagher is probably best known for his signature "Sledge-o-Matic" bit, in which he demolishes watermelons (and other objects) with a sledgehammer at the end of each set. Though he reached the height of his popularity in the 1980s, Gallagher has been performing stand-up comedy for over 40 years.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Feb 14

Feb 14

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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Ira Glass is the host and creator of the public radio program This American Life. The show premiered on Chicago’s public radio station WBEZ in 1995 and is now heard on more than 500 public radio stations each week by over 1.7 million listeners. Most weeks, the podcast of the program is the most popular podcast in America. The show also airs each week on the CBC in Canada and on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s radio network.

Glass began his career as an intern at National Public Radio’s network headquarters in Washington, DC in 1978, when he was 19 years old. Over the years, he worked on nearly every NPR network news program and held virtually every production job in NPR’s Washington headquarters. He has been a tape cutter, newscast writer, desk assistant, editor, and producer. He has filled in as host of Talk of the Nation and Weekend All Things Considered.

Under Glass’s editorial direction, This American Life has won the highest honors for broadcasting and journalistic excellence, including several Peabody and DuPont-Columbia awards. The American Journalism Review declared that the show is “at the vanguard of a journalistic revolution.”

A television adaptation of This Ameri-
can Life ran on the Showtime network for two seasons, in 2007 and 2008, winning three Emmy awards, including Outstanding Nonfiction Series. The show has put out its own comic book, three greatest hits compilations, DVDs of live shows and other events, a “radio decoder” toy, temporary tattoos and a paint-by-numbers set. Half a dozen stories are in development to become feature films. In 2013 Ira Glass received the Medal for Spoken Language from the American Academy of Arts & Letters.

Glass is married and owns a disturbingly allergic dog

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Feb 14

Feb 14

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $17.50

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian


At a young age, Shemekia Copeland is already a force to be reckoned with in the blues. While only in her early 30’s, she’s opened for the Rolling Stones, headlined at the Chicago Blues Festival and numerous festivals around the world, scored critics choice awards on both sides of the Atlantic (The New York Times and The Times of London), shared the stage with such luminaries as Buddy Guy, B.B. King, Mick Jagger, and Eric Clapton, and has even performed at the White House for President and Mrs. Obama. Heir to the rich tradition of soul-drenched divas like Ruth Brown, Etta James and Koko Taylor, the singer was presented with Taylor’s crown on June 12, 2011 at the Chicago Blues Festival and officially given the honor as the new “Queen of the Blues” by Taylor’s daughter, Cookie. Copeland’s passion for singing, matched with her huge, blast-furnace voice, gives her music a timeless power and a heart-pounding urgency. Her music comes from deep within her soul and from the streets where she grew up, surrounded by the everyday sounds of the city – street performers, gospel singers, blasting radios, bands in local parks and so much more. Born in Harlem, New York, in 1979, Copeland actually came to her singing career slowly. Her father, the late Texas blues guitar legend Johnny Clyde Copeland, recognized his daughter’s talent early on. He always encouraged her to sing at home, and even brought her on stage to sing at Harlem’s famed Cotton Club when she was just eight. At the time, Shemekia’s embarrassment outweighed her desire to sing. But when she was fifteen and her father’s health began to fail, her outlook changed. “It was like a switch went off in my head, and I wanted to sing,” she says. “It became a want and a need. I had to do it.” At only 19, Shemekia stepped out of her father’s shadow with the Alligator release of 1998 debut recording, Turn the Heat Up!, and the critics raved. The Village Voice called her “nothing short of uncanny,” while the Boston Globe proclaimed that “she roars with a sizzling hot intensity.” A year later, she appeared in the Motion Picture Three To Tango, while her song “I Always Get My Man, was featured in the film Broken Hearts Club. Her second album, Wicked, released in 2000, scored three Handy Awards (Song of the Year, Blues Album of the Year, Contemporary Female Artist of the Year) and a GRAMMY nomination. Two years later, New Orleans R&B legend Dr. John stepped in to produce her third recording, Talking To Strangers (2002), which Vibe called “a masterful blend of ballsy rockers and cheeky ballads.” Copeland released The Soul Truth in 2005. The album was produced by legendary Stax guitarist Steve Cropper (who also played on the CD), and featured generous doses of blues, funk and Memphis-flavored soul. Never Going Back, her 2009 debut on Telarc, a division of Concord Music Group, captured Copeland at a crossroads on that artistic path. While Copeland will always remain loyal to her blues roots, Never Going Back took a more forward view of the blues, and in so doing pointed her music and her career in a new direction. Produced by Oliver Wood, guest players included John Medeski, Marc Ribot and Chris Wood. “I’ve had success in my career, and I’m happy with that,” she says. “But that doesn’t mean I don’t want to continue to grow. In order for an artist to grow – and for a genre to grow – you have to do new things. I’m extremely proud to say I’m a blues singer, but that doesn’t mean that’s the only thing I’m capable of singing, or that’s the only style of music I’m capable of making.” She adds: “I want to keep growing. My main goal when I started this was that I was going to do something different with this music, so that this music could evolve and grow. I got that idea from my father. He didn’t do the typical one-four-five blues. He went to Africa and worked with musicians there. He was one of the first blues artists to do that. I want to be the same way. I want to be innovative with the blues.” Copeland has just finished recording a brilliant new album, 33 1/3, produced by Oliver Wood and set for release September 25, 2012 on Telarc.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Feb 20

Feb 20

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $12-$15

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Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian


Internal Sounds, the anticipated new album from The Sadies, will be released September 17 on Yep Roc Records. In advance of the release, the new song “Another Tomorrow Again,” which American Songwriter describes as “…the perfect teaser for the album,” can be heard here: http://www.americansongwriter.com/2013/07/song-premiere-the-sadies-another-tomorrow-again/. Additionally, the album’s lead track, “The First 5 Minutes,” can be heard here: https://soundcloud.com/outside-music/the-sadies-the-first-5-minutes. In celebration of the album, The Sadies are currently in the midst of a Canadian tour; please see below for a list of dates. Recorded in Toronto, the 11-track album was produced by The Sadies’ Dallas Good (guitars, organ, vocals) and mixed by Peter J. Moore. In addition to Good, the album features band members Travis Good (guitars, fiddle, vocals), Sean Dean (bass) and Mike Belitsky (drums). Of the experience, Dallas Good comments, “There was a conscious effort to deliver a finished product that wouldn’t suffer from a deadline or budget. We recorded this record over a span of a year, in session for 20-plus days. By the end, we’d spent every dime we had and used up every favor. There is usually a sense of immediacy to our records, maybe because we make a lot of them. I didn’t want that this time.” Formed in Toronto in 1994, the band has released 16 studio albums, including 2010’s Darker Circles, which the A.V. Club describes as, “…full of strong melodies, beautiful guitars, and the ghosts of a unsettled past” and which Under The Radar praises as, “…twangingly irresistible guitar interplay.” Additional recordings include Precious Moments (1998), Pure Diamond Gold (1999), Tremendous Efforts (2001), Stories Often Told (2002), Favourite Colours (2004), In Concert Volume One (2006), Tales of the Rat Fink (2006) and New Seasons (2007). They have also released two albums with Andre Williams (1999’s Red Dirt and 2012’s Night and Day), an album with Jon Langford (2003’s Mayors of the Moon), an album with Neko Case (2004’s The Tigers Have Spoken) and an album with John Doe (2009’s Country Club). Country Club went on to chart on Billboard’s U.S. Country and Indie charts and reached #10 on the U.S. Heatseekers chart.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Price: $49.50-69.50

Mar 5

Mar 5

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS PERFORMANCE HAS BEEN RECHEDULED FOR MARCH 5, 2015. ALL TICKETS WILL BE HONORED.



Lily Tomlin is an award-winning star of stage and screen, known especially for comedic performances going back to her days on TV's Laugh-In in the early 1970s. She grew up in Detroit, but went to New York in 1965 to be a performer. Tomlin became a regular cast member of the comedy sketch show Laugh-In in late 1969, and soon became one of the most popular players, thanks to recurring characters such as Ernestine the telephone operator and Edith Ann, a sagacious five year-old. Tomlin left the show in 1973, having released two successful comedy records of her own, the Grammy-winning This Is A Recording (1971) and the Grammy-nominated And That's The Truth (1972, as Edith Ann). She's had a stellar career, one that includes an Oscar nomination for her performance in Robert Altman's Nashville (1975), as well as hit films such as The Late Show (1977), Nine to Five (1980, with Jane Fonda and Dolly Parton) and Flirting With Disaster (1996, starring Ben Stiller). She's won Emmys for writing TV specials in 1974, 1976, 1978 and 1981, and been a regular cast member on Murphy Brown (1996-98), The West Wing (2002-06), Damages (2010, the third season) and Desperate Housewives (2008-09). Her one-woman Broadway show in 1977, Appearing Nitely, earned a special Tony award, and she won another Tony for her performance in The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe, a 1985 one-woman show co-written with her longtime life and writing partner, Jane Wagner. A frequent stage performer who pops up in small TV and film roles, Tomlin is also a 2003 recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Little Daylight and Secret Someones

Mar 6

Mar 6

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $15

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Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian


 


Jukebox the Ghost’s third album Safe Travels marks a period in the band’s career that’s steeped in change, both personally and professionally. Relationships dissolved and crumbled. Loved ones passed on. The band themselves relocated from Philadelphia to New York City and played over 200 shows since the release of their last album in 2010. In the midst of so much change, the band spent months in the studio creating what would become Safe Travels, a record that represents a shift in the band’s creative trajectory. “It felt like the music was finally growing with us—Songs that relate to who we are as people right now, not who we were when we were 19 or 20,” Siegel said. “This record is more heartfelt; part of that came from not worrying about exactly what kind of music we were supposed to be making and instead just working on songs that felt genuine and natural at the time.” Safe Travels, at its core, represents three people going through universal life changes—A way of coping with how quickly things can turn around, for good and bad. And though it’s clear their sound and outlook have matured to addressing some darker subject material, their brand of upbeat pop still remains intact. “We’ve always been the kind of band that juxtaposes darker lyrics with upbeat music, but this record feels a little more personal,” Thornewill said. “In the grand scheme of things, it’s certainly not a downer record but you need pain to get joy, and joy to get pain; they’re inseparable.” Bolstered by an appearance on the Late Show with David Letterman, an appearance at Lollapalooza, and extended opening tours with Ben Folds, Guster, Adam Green and Jack’s Mannequin, the band has acquired an incredibly loyal (and sometimes rabid) fanbase since the release of 2008’s Live and Let Ghosts. Over the years, Jukebox the Ghost has maintained a tour schedule that most bands would balk at, playing over 150 shows a year and becoming a well-oiled, high energy live band. This summer, the band embarks on their biggest headline tour to date after performing at Bonnaroo on the album’s release weekend—Their Bowery Ballroom show in June has already sold out two months in advance. Safe Travels also marks the first time that the band had been afforded unlimited studio time. The sessions took place in Brooklyn, with their friend Dan Romer (Ingrid Michaelson, Jenny Owens Young) producing and engineering. The result is a collection of 13 songs that finds the band maturing both musically and lyrically. The band was also able to work with a string section for the first time, which gave Thornewill the chance to flex his compositional skills and formal classical training. They’d be the first to admit that their previous two records had a charming, “hyperactive” quality about them, but you don’t get that sense here. There’s a balance between the peppy piano pop of songs like the album’s upbeat opener “Somebody”, the bouncy synth-pop of “Oh, Emily” and the radio-ready drama of “Don’t Let Me Fall Behind” to more poignant, contemplative songs in the album’s second half that represent the band’s desire to travel into new sonic territory. “In the past Ben and Tommy sometimes wrote from various fictional perspectives” says drummer Jesse Kristin, “but the songs on this album feel closer, more personal, and steeped in actual life experiences.” This creative shift is best exemplified by “Dead,” “Adulthood,” “Ghosts in Empty Houses,” and “The Spiritual” – songs that deal with death and mortality head on, with an immediacy that was masked on previous albums. “Adulthood” was initially a difficult song for Thornewill to perform. Written before his grandfather’s death from lung cancer, the line “In my lungs I still feel young” was painfully prophetic and the overall message that “from adulthood, no one survives” became all too real. “Dead” approaches a similar theme with understated elegance. The song begins with Siegel’s innocent, boyish croon over a ghostly drone and builds into a climax with post-rock ferocity entirely new to the band’s catalogue. “Even though we’re tackling some difficult themes this go-round, we’re still a band that wants people to feel good,” said Tommy. “We’re the same upbeat band we’ve always been, but we’re firm believers that pop music can have depth.” Ask Brooklyn’s Jukebox the Ghost why their third album is called Safe Travels, on a surface level, it’s likely they’ll tell you about a song by Austin’s Red Hunter, who performs as Peter and the Wolf. The song, from his 2006 album ”Lightness” became something of a mantra for the band. “Since we’re always in new cities and away from the people we love, that song really hit home for us,” said Ben. “It was a song that represented saying goodbye.” On Safe Travels, Jukebox the Ghost manages to contrast these darker themes with the same optimistic sound and a familiar sense of youthfulness that stays true to their core.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Mar 13

Mar 13

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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ROBERT CRAY IN MY SOUL "First and foremost, the stories are where my heart lies," says Robert Cray. "In the blues guitar thing, most of the time, you carve out the section for the solo and that's really what the song is based on. And I love that, there's a time for that, but then I have to get back into the meat and bones of storytelling." With his seventeenth studio album, In My Soul, the five-time Grammy winner (and 15-time nominee) reasserts his position as one of his generation's great musical storytellers—this time steeped in the down-home sound and rich emotion of Southern Soul, yet never straying far from his incomparable guitar mastery. Produced by Steve Jordan, whose long list of credits includes extensive work with Keith Richards and John Mayer, the album blends funky originals with surprising covers, and captures a new configuration of the Robert Cray Band: long-time bass player Richard Cousins is joined by keyboardist Dover Weinberg (returning to the group, with which he played in the 1970s and '80s) as well as new drummer Les Falconer. Robert Cray is widely recognized as one of the greatest guitarists of our time. The New Yorker recently called him “one of the most reliable pleasures of soul and blues for over three decades now.“ He has written or performed with everyone from Eric Clapton to Stevie Ray Vaughan, from Bonnie Raitt to John Lee Hooker, and in 2011, he was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame. But when it comes time for a new recording, Cray remains as open as ever to pure creativity. "In my recollection, we have never sat down and decided what kind of record we're going to make," he says. "This time, I knew we were going to do an R&B thing, because that's what we've done whenever we work with Steve, but we didn't have a concept—that develops because of the songs and the people who play on it." The first song they worked on for In My Soul was a Booker T & the MGs-style instrumental, written by Cousins and Hendrix Ackle; making no secret of the inspiration, they gave it the winking title "Hip Tight Onions" (as in the MGs three biggest hits—"Hip Hug-Her," "Time is Tight," and "Green Onions"). "That really helped set the tone," says Cray. "We ran that song for a bit, continuously playing that groove, and we got a feel for each other, and for Steve, and for a new tune. And from there, we fell into this real funk feel." Jordan, whom Cray describes as "almost a fifth member of the band," proposed a couple of covers—Otis Redding's "Nobody's Fault But My Own" and "Your Good Thing (Is About to End)," initially recorded in 1966 by Stax artist Mable John but later turned into a hit for Lou Rawls. "When I think of Robert Cray, I think of a great singer," says the producer. "Most people gravitate to his guitar playing because he's such a gunslinger, but I don't. He's got so much soul it's ridiculous. 'Good Thing' just sounded like Robert to me—it has a touch of jazz, and that strong, Chicago-based R&B in the Lou Rawls version. With the Otis tune, I just thought, 'Robert can eat this up,' and not a lot of people can do justice to that vocal." Cray countered with the idea of doing a song that would ultimately give the album its title, "Deep in My Soul" by the late Bobby "Blue" Bland. "I didn't want to change it—just do it pretty straight up as a tribute to Bobby, who was one of my real heroes," says Cray. The bulk of In My Soul, though, is made up of original material, composed by various members of the band. The album opens with the hard-charging "You Move Me," instantly identifiable as classic Cray, with his signature slicing guitar leads woven throughout. "I Guess I'll Never Know," co-written by drummer Falconer with Jeff Paris and Rick Whitfield, adds a slipperier groove to the mix, in the style of Willie Mitchell's productions for Hi Records. Bonus track "Pillow," available on a limited edition CD version of the album, began as a melodic snippet written by the late session guitarist Jerry Friedman, which Cray extended (complete with a sitar-like guitar effect) into what Steve Jordan calls "a '70s-Blaxploitation movie kind of vibe—it's Robert as Shaft!" "All the originals that came in were really good, and that's not always the case," says the producer. "It sure made my job easier—I just had to make sure the arrangements and sound and groove were right." Perhaps most notable is "What Would You Say?," an aching tune that finds Cray longing for a better world. "It's just a response to all that's going on—wars, disease, or just someone standing outside the supermarket asking for food or for a job. That's all part of everyday life, and I just had to talk about it." In My Soul includes plenty of Cray's blazing guitar work, which Rolling Stone recently said “introduced a new generation of mainstream rock fans to the language and form of the blues.” But he maintains that he's most excited about the way in which this project presents the complete Robert Cray Band. "I like that I got to play as part of a unit, as a quartet," he says. "That, to me, is just as much fun as playing a solo. There are lots of different grooves and styles on this record, and we had to give each song its own identity. That's where we're at as a band—the most important part is to lay down a groove that's going to carry the story. The solos are just icing on the cake." This year marks Robert Cray's fortieth anniversary as a musician, and with In My Soul, he is celebrating in style. He notes, with pride and with some amusement, that he continues to see new, younger faces in his audience. "There's a younger generation now whose parents turned them on to our music," he says. "It reminds me of when I was young and going to see Buddy Guy, Albert Collins, all the blues I could. It is kind of funny to be in the position of being the older generation now. But I'm just going to continue to do what we do. I can only do what I know, and we'll see what happens." -- IN MY SOUL TRACK-BY-TRACK You Move Me—"That's just a bluesy, upbeat type of tune, talking about my loved one, talking about the way she does me. It's a fun, simple, straight-ahead square beat, a nice rocking tune." Nobody's Fault But Mine—"An Otis Redding cover. All of us in the band, we grew up listening to that kind of music, and it's pretty dear to our hearts." Steve Jordan: "I just thought, 'Robert can eat this one up.' It's got the guitar stuff, but also the singing. Not a lot of people can do justice to that vocal. Also, we were looking for song to get vocals out of Les, so we approached this Otis tune like it was a Sam and Dave song." Fine Yesterday—"I'd been working on this over the summer and fall, and just pieced it together. It kind of has the feel of an early '60s thing, a song like 'Sitting in the Park.' I thought I would just be bold and go, 'What makes you think you could do something like that?'" Your Good Thing (Is About To End)—"That was Steve's idea. The cool thing is that when he mentioned it, I said 'Fantastic!'— I always loved that tune, and Dover happens to be one of the biggest Lou Rawls fans ever, so I knew it was going to go over big. But Steve didn't want to do just that version; it's really a combination of the different versions, the original by Mable John and also the OV Wright version. Steve said, 'Let's you and me go cut it,' and just the two of us went in and did it. We didn't rehearse, just played it and tried to make it as funky as possible." I Guess I'll Never Know—"A song about somebody losing their loved one. The cool thing about this song is that it's got a really funky beat, and it's co-written by our drummer, Les Falconer. It's nice and funky, almost reminiscent of a Hi Records, Willie Mitchell production." Hold On—"This one was written by Richard Cousins and Hendrix Ackle. We played it from the music they gave us, but then we changed up the lyric a little to make it more of a '70s Philly kind of thing. It's a departure from the Memphis sound, but still in that classic soul thing." What Would You Say—"A song that's about making the world a better place. Saying 'Can we do that? Can we help homeless people, can we try to cure diseases?' It's a response to all that's going on, from wars to someone outside the supermarket asking for food or for a job, all of that is part of everyday life. I was reading about Syria and the gas attack on those children—everybody forgets about kids during war and how horrible that is. So this is just how it came out, I just had to talk about it." Hip Tight Onions—"I don't think we've ever recorded an instrumental before. This was penned by our bass player, Richard Cousins, and his writing friend Hendrix Ackle, and it's a tribute to Booker T and the MGs." You're Everything—"Just a love tune, talking about how my world has changed because of who I'm with." Deep in My Soul—"I knew I wanted to do Bobby Bland tune, and I was banging my head as to which one. Then I found one CD with a massive amount of Bland songs on it, and I hadn't heard this one for a long time. I brought it in, and everybody loved it. I didn't want to change it—just do it pretty straight up as a tribute to Bobby, who was one of my real heroes. He came to see us before he passed, about a year and a half ago, he came to a show with his wife and son and just stood in the wings, and it was such a big honor, really cool." Steve Jordan: "We had nine or ten songs recorded, but we didn't really have a deep blues song—I wanted to get that feel, something riveting that lays the gauntlet down. Robert pulled out this song, and I had never heard it before. It was haunting and very deep, and the way he sang it, I got chills. You'd be hard pressed to think you could get as good as Bland did, but Robert gave a really extraordinary performance. Put that one on and you just have to shut up!" Pillow—"Steve had sent me a piece of music by a guy named Jerry Friedman, a great session player who played on 'Supernatural Thing' and a bunch of other stuff. It wasn't complete, there was no lyric, so we just kind of put it together—we started from music we had, tried to make it funky, came up with the idea for an electric sitar sound. It sounds great as instrumental, and we may still put it out like that, but the original title was 'You're My Pillow,' so we just kind of worked a story around that."

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

**NOTE: All Orchestra seating is general admission. If you want reserved seating in the balcony please choose "Loge Reserved" seating.**

Apr 10

Apr 10

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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Formed as a quartet in Chicago in 1998 and relocated to Los Angeles three years later, OK Go (Damian Kulash, Tim Nordwind, Dan Konopka, Andy Ross) have spent their career in a steady state of transformation. The four songs of the all-new Upside Out EP represent the first preview of Hungry Ghosts, due out in the fall on the band’s own Paracadute. This is the band’s fourth full-length and the newest addition to a curriculum vitae filled with experimentation in a variety of mediums. The band worked with longtime producer and friend Dave Fridmann (Flaming Lips, Weezer, MGMT), while also enlisting a new collaborator in Los Angeles, veteran Tony Hoffer, (Beck, Phoenix, Foster the People) to create their most comfortable and far-reaching songs yet. Building on (and deconstructing) 15 years of pop-rock smarts, musical friendship, and band-of-the-future innovations the EP, Upside Out, offers a concise overview of forthcoming Hungry Ghosts’ melancholic fireworks (“The Writing’s on the Wall”), basement funk parties (“Turn Up The Radio”), IMAX-sized choruses (“The One Moment”), and space-age dance floor bangers (“I Won’t Let You Down”). Drawn from the same marching orders issued to big-hearted happiness creators as Queen, T. Rex, The Cars or Cheap Trick, and a lifetime of mixed tapes exchanged by lifelong music fans, Upside Out is a reaffirmation of the sounds and ideas that brought the band together in the first place. The four songs provide an assured kick-off to a new sequence of interconnected performances, videos, dances, and wild, undreamt fun. “As the band has evolved over the last 15 years, the creative palette we work with has expanded in so many unexpected and gratifying directions,” says frontman Damian Kulash. “This record feels like it’s the musical manifestation of that — like we can speak in a clearer voice when we are playing in a bigger sandbox. Just as the band’s whole project became clearer to us as we learned to find more homes for our creativity — we triangulated it from more directions. And, I think the music itself has gotten more focused for similar reasons. We went in with fewer preconceptions of who we are or what our sound is, and came out with a record that sounds much more uniquely our own because of it.” Continuing a career that includes viral videos, New York Times op-eds, a major label split and the establishment of a DIY trans-media mini-empire, collaborations with pioneering dance companies and tech giants, animators and Muppets, OK Go continue to fearlessly dream and build new worlds in a time when creative boundaries have all but dissolved.

The Hangar Theatre - Ithaca, NY

Apr 11

Apr 11

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $29.50-$35

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Iris DeMent says of that elusive inspirational spark, “I didn’t know when or if I’d make another record. I gave up on trying to steer it or force it and decided to just make myself available in my heart and mind as much as I could and leave the rest up to fate.” Sixteen years after the last collection of DeMent songs, that time has come. Sing The Delta presents twelve self-penned compositions from an artist whose first three albums established her as one of the most beloved and respected writers and singers in American music. DeMent, the last of 14 children, born in Arkansas and raised in Southern California, grew up immersed in gospel music and traditional country. She was somewhat of a late bloomer as an artist, writing her first song at age of 25. Her first release, Infamous Angel, initially issued on Rounder in 1992 before being picked up by Warner Bros., immediately established her as a promising and talented artist. Its 1994 follow-up, My Life, earned a Grammy nomination in the Contemporary Folk category. Her 1996 album The Way I Should addressed political as well as personal themes and earned a Grammy nomination, as well. Along the way, several of DeMent’s songs became cultural touchstones. “Let The Mystery Be” found its way to MTV Unplugged as a duet by David Byrne and Natalie Merchant. “Our Town” was played over the farewell scene in the series finale of Northern Exposure. Merle Haggard, who said of DeMent, “She’s the best singer I’ve ever heard,” invited her to sit in as his piano player touring with his legendary band The Strangers. He subsequently covered two of her songs “No Time To Cry” and the gospel-tinged “The Shores of Jordan.” DeMent remained active as an artist. She sang four duets with John Prine on In Spite of Ourselves and had a minor role in the motion picture Songcatcher as well as contributing a song to its soundtrack. She continued playing live shows and in 2004, she recorded an album of gospel songs, Lifeline, which included her rendition of “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms.” In 2010 the Coen Brothers chose that song for the closing credits when they remade the classic western “True Grit.” Still, DeMent never took for granted the arrival of an album’s worth of new songs. “Songs would come along here and there and I’d go out and sing them for people, but for a long time I just didn’t know what would become of any of them. Then last year, a door kinda opened up, and a handful of songs walked through and a few unfinished ones came together and I knew I had a record.” As with Lifeline, DeMent is releasing Sing The Delta on her own label, Flariella Records. It was recorded at Richard McLaurin’s House of David studio in Nashville with co-producers Richard Bennett and Bo Ramsey, with a supporting cast that included Bryan Owings on drums, Dave Jacques on bass, Al Perkins on pedal steel and Reese Wynans on B3 organ, as well as horn players Jim Hoke and Steve Herman on a couple of numbers. Of the time it took, DeMent says “Some of these songs I’ve had around awhile but I needed time to grow into them. I guess you could say I just wasn’t ready to deliver them in the way that they deserved. I’m glad I waited. It’s taught me to surrender…to trust the natural flow and order of things and not worry about it,” DeMent says. It’s an instinct she’s learned to trust ever since she first sat down to write her first couple of songs at age 25 and found “Our Town” spilling out onto the page. “It was like somebody walked right into that room and said, ‘There you have it, Iris’ — I knew then and there that I had gotten my calling,” she relates. “I had always been taught in church that God, or spirit, if you will, calls us to a life work. I got mine that day. Whether I write one song a year or ten, it doesn’t matter. It’s a ‘knowing’ that I have that hasn’t left me since that day. That’s what I check in with and as long as that’s there, the rest of it doesn’t matter. The time it takes is just the time it takes.”

The Hangar Theatre - Ithaca, NY

Tickets are available online or in person at The State Theatre Box Office.

May 3

May 3

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $35-$40

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Bruce Cockburn has always been a restless spirit. Over the course of four decades, the celebrated Canadian artist has traveled to the corners of the earth out of humanitarian concerns—often to trouble spots experiencing events that have led to some of his most memorable songs. Going up against chaos, even if it involves grave risks, can be necessary to get closer to the truth. “My mother once said that I must have a death wish, always going to what she called ‘those awful places,’” laughs Cockburn. “I don’t think of it that way. I make these trips partly because I want to see things for myself and partly out of my own sense of adventure.” Small Source of Comfort, Cockburn’s 31st album, is his latest adventurous collection of songs of romance, protest and spiritual discovery. The album, primarily acoustic yet rhythmically savvy, is rich in Cockburn’s characteristic blend of folk, blues, jazz and rock. As usual, many of the new compositions come from his travels and spending time in places like San Francisco and Brooklyn to the Canadian Forces base in Kandahar, Afghanistan, jotting down his typically detailed observations about the human experience. “Each One Lost” and “Comets of Kandahar,” one of five instrumentals on the album, stem from a trip Cockburn made to war-torn Afghanistan in 2009. The elegiac “Each One Lost” was written after Cockburn witnessed a ceremony honouring two young Canadian Forces soldiers who had been killed that day and whose coffins were being flown back to Canada. It was, recalls Cockburn, “one of the saddest and most moving scenes I’ve been privileged to witness.” “Here come the dead boys, moving slowly past the pipes and prayers and strained commanding voices,” Cockburn sings solemnly on “Each One Lost.” Over a mournful accordion, the simple chorus sums up the gravity of the hymn-like song: “each one lost is a vital part of you and me.” In contrast, one light-hearted number reflects Cockburn’s frequently underappreciated sense of humour. “Called Me Back” is a comic reflection on the frustrations of waiting for a return phone call that never comes. Meanwhile, listeners are bound to be intrigued by “Call Me Rose,” written from the point of view of disgraced former U.S. president Richard Nixon, who receives a chance at redemption after being reincarnated as a single mother living in a housing project with two children. Brooklyn-based violinist Jenny Scheinman is one of Bruce’s two female collaborators on Small Source of Comfort. Scheinman, best known for her work with Bill Frisell and Norah Jones, provides some thrilling flourishes to instrumentals like “Lois on the Autobahn” and the bluesy, gypsy-like swing of “Comets of Kandahar,” a track that Cockburn describes as “Django meets John Lee Hooker.” Produced by longtime associate Colin Linden, the album also features Annabelle Chvostek, a Montreal-based singer-songwriter with whom Cockburn wrote two songs on which they also harmonize: the introspective “Driving Away” and the driving, freewheeling “Boundless.” In addition to newcomers Scheinman and Chvostek, Small Source of Comfort includes such regular Cockburn accompanists as bassist Jon Dymond, drummer Gary Craig and producer Linden, who also plays guitar. As always, there’s a spiritual side to Cockburn’s latest collection, best reflected on the closing “Gifts,” a song written in 1968 and but recorded here for the first time, and “The Iris of the World,” which opens the album. The latter includes the humorously rueful line, “I’m good at catching rainbows, not so good at catching trout.” That admission serves as a useful metaphor for Cockburn’s approach to songwriting. “As you go through life, it’s like taking a hike alongside a river,” he explains. “Your eye catches little things that flash in the water, various stones and flotsam. I’m a bit of a packrat when it comes to saving these reflections. And, occasionally, a few of them make their way into songs.” Those songs, along with his humanitarian work, have brought Cockburn a long list of honours, including 13 Juno Awards, an induction into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, a Governor General’s Performing Arts Award and several international awards. In 1982, he was made a Member of the Order of Canada and was promoted to Officer in 2002. Last year, the Luminato festival honoured Cockburn’s extensive songbook with a tribute concert featuring such varied guests as jazz guitarist Michael Occhipinti, folk-rapper Buck 65, country rockers Blackie and The Rodeo Kings, country-folk singers Sylvia Tyson and Amelia Curran, pop artists the Barenaked Ladies and Hawksley Workman, and folk-pop trio The Wailin’ Jennys. Never content to rest on his laurels, Cockburn keeps looking ahead. “I’d rather think about what I’m going to do next,” he once said. “My models for graceful aging are guys like John Lee Hooker and Mississippi John Hurt, who never stopped working till they dropped, as I fully expect to be doing, and just getting better as musicians and as human beings.” Small Source of Comfort, a reflection of Cockburn’s ever-expanding world of wonders, is the latest step in his creative evolution.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Contender for the title of greatest blues guitarist ever, with a fiery, screechy, super-quick technique that influenced countless followers.

Jun 5

Jun 5

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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Buddy Guy is one of the most celebrated blues guitarists of his generation (and arguably the most celebrated), possessing a sound and style that embodied the traditions of classic Chicago blues while also embracing the fire and flash of rock & roll. Guy spent much of his career as a well-regarded journeymen, cited as a modern master by contemporary blues fans but not breaking through to a larger audience, before he finally caught the brass ring in the 1990s and released a series of albums that made him one of the biggest blues acts of the day, a seasoned veteran with a modern edge. And few guitarists of any genre have enjoyed the respect of their peers as Guy has, with such giants as Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck, Keith Richards, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and Mark Knopfler all citing him as a personal favorite. George "Buddy" Guy was born in Lettsworth, Louisiana on July 30, 1936, and is said to have first learned to play on a homemade two-string instrument fashioned from wire and tin cans. Guy graduated to an acoustic guitar, and began soaking up the influences of blues players such as T-Bone Walker, B.B. King, and Lightnin' Hopkins; as his family relocated to Baton Rouge, Guy had the opportunity to see live performances by Lightnin' Slim (aka Otis Hicks) and Guitar Slim, whose raw, forceful sound and over the top showmanship left a serious impression on Guy. Guy started playing professionally when he became a sideman for John "Big Poppa" Tilley, where he learned to work the crowd and overcome early bouts of stage fright. In 1957, Guy cut a demo tape at a local radio station and sent a copy to Chess Records, the label that was home to such giants as Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, and Etta James, shortly before buying a one-way train ticket and moving to Chicago, eager to make music his career. Hoodoo Man BluesGuy didn't enjoy immediate success in Chicago, and struggled to find gigs until his fiery guitar work and flashy stage style (which included hopping on top of bars and strutting up and down their length while soloing, thanks to a 100-foot long guitar cable) made him a regular winner in talent night contests at Windy City clubs. Guy struck up friendships with some of the city's best blues artists, including Muddy Waters, Otis Rush, Freddie King, and Magic Sam, and landed a steady gig at the 708 Club, where he became known as a talent to watch. In 1958, Magic Sam arranged for Guy to meet Harold Burrage, the owner of local blues label Cobra Records, and Guy was soon signed to Cobra's sister label Artistic Records. Willie Dixon produced Guy's debut single, "Sit and Cry (The Blues)," as well as the follow-up, "This Is the End," but in 1959, Cobra and Artistic abruptly closed up shop, and like labelmate Otis Rush, Guy found a new record deal at Chess. Guy's first single for Chess, 1960's "First Time I Met the Blues," was an artistic triumph and a modest commercial success that became one of his signature tunes, but it was also the first chapter in what would prove to be a complicated creative relationship between Guy and label co-founder Leonard Chess, who recognized his talent but didn't appreciate the louder and more expressive aspects of his guitar style. While Guy enjoyed minor successes with outstanding Chess singles such as "Stone Crazy" and "When My Left Eye Jumps," much of his work for the label was as a sideman, lending his talents to sessions for Muddy Waters, Koko Taylor, Howlin' Wolf, Little Walter, and many others. And one of Guy's definitive recordings of the '60s wasn't even issued by Chess; Guy had been performing occasionally with blues harpist Junior Wells, and Guy and his band backed up Wells on the 1965 Delmark release Hoodoo Man Blues, a masterful exercise in the Chicago blues style, with Guy credited as "Friendly Chap" on initial pressings in deference to his contract with Chess. I Left My Blues in San Francisco Chess didn't issue an album on Guy until the 1967 release of I Left My Blues in San Francisco, and when his contract with the label ran out, he promptly signed with Vanguard, who put out A Man and the Blues in 1968. As a growing number of rock fans were discovering the blues, Guy was finding his stock rising with both traditional blues enthusiasts and younger white audiences, and his recordings for Vanguard gave him more room for the tougher and more aggressive sound that was the trademark of his live shows. (It didn't hurt that Jimi Hendrix acknowledged Guy as an influence and praised his live show in interviews.) At the same time, Guy hadn't forsaken the more measured approach he used with Junior Wells; Buddy and Wells cut an album that also featured Junior Mance on piano for Blue Thumb called Buddy and the Juniors, and in 1972, Eric Clapton partnered with Ahmet Ertegun and Tom Dowd to produce the album Buddy Guy and Junior Wells Play the Blues. In 1974, Guy and Wells played the Montreux Jazz Festival, with Bill Wyman of the Rolling Stones sitting in on bass; the show was later released as a live album, Drinkin' TNT and Smokin' Dynamite, with Wyman credited as producer. Alone & Acoustic By the end of the '70s, Guy was without an American record deal, and his career took a hit as a result; while he recorded some material for specialist labels in Europe and Japan, and Alligator issued two collections in 1981, Alone and Acoustic and Stone Crazy, for the most part Guy supported himself in the '80s through extensive touring and live work, often appearing in Europe, where he seemed better respected than in the United States. Despite this, he continued to plug away at the American market, buoyed by interest from guitar buffs who had heard major stars sing his praises; in 1985, Eric Clapton told a reporter for Musician magazine, "Buddy Guy is by far and without a doubt the best guitar player alive...he really changed the course of rock & roll blues," while Vaughan declared, "Without Buddy Guy, there would be no Stevie Ray Vaughan." In 1989, Guy opened his own nightclub in Chicago, Buddy Guy's Legends, where he frequently performed and played host to other top blues acts, and in 1991, after a well-received appearance with Clapton at London's Royal Albert Hall (documented in part on the album 24 Nights), he finally scored an international record deal with the Silvertone label, distributed by BMG. Guy's first album for Silvertone, Damn Right, I've Got the Blues, featured guest appearances by Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Mark Knopfler, and featured fresh versions of several fan favorites as well as a handful of new tunes; it was the Buddy Guy album that finally clicked with record buyers, and became a genuine hit, earning Guy a gold album, as well as a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album. Guy wasted no time cutting follow-ups, releasing Feels Like Rain in 1993 and Slippin' In in 1994, both of which racked up solid sales figures and won Guy further Grammy Awards. Last Time Around: Live at Legends In 1993, Guy reunited with Junior Wells on the stage of his Legends club; it would prove to be one of Wells' last live performances, and the show was released in 1998, several months after Wells' passing, on the album Last Time Around: Live at Legends. While most of Guy's work in the late '90s and into the new millennium was the sort of storming Chicago blues that was the basis of his reputation, he also demonstrated he was capable of exploring other avenues, channeling the hypnotic Deep Southern blues of Junior Kimbrough on 2001's Sweet Tea and covering a set of traditional blues classics on acoustic guitar for 2003's Blues Singer. In 2004, Guy won the W.C. Handy Award from the American Blues Foundation for the 23rd time, more than any other artist, while he took home his sixth Grammy Award in 2010 for the album Living Proof. Guy also received the National Medal of the Arts in 2003, and was awarded with Kennedy Center Honors in 2012. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2005, with both Eric Clapton and B.B. King presenting him with his award, and in 2012 he performed a special concert at the White House, where he persuaded President Barack Obama to join him at the vocal mike for a few choruses of "Sweet Home Chicago." Guy continued his late-career revival with the 2012 memoir When I Left Home: My Story and the summer 2013 release of the ambitious, guest star-laden double album Rhythm & Blues.

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

Jun 13

Jun 13

Doors open at 5:00 pm Starts at 7:30 pm All ages

Price: $55-$85

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If you put your ear to the street, you can hear the rumble of the world in motion; people going to and from work, to school, to the grocery store. You may even hear the whisper of their living rooms, their conversation, their complaints, and if you’re lucky, their laughter. If you’re almost anywhere in America, you’ll hear something different, something special, something you recognize but haven’t heard in a long time. It is the sound of a real celebration.It is not New Year’s, and it is not a political convention. It is neither a prime time game-show, nor a music video countdown, bloated with fame and sponsorship. What you are hearing is the love for a music. It is the unbridled outcry of support for a song that sings to the heart, that dances with the soul. The jubilation is in the theaters, the bars, the music clubs, the festivals. The love is for a band.The songs are honest: just chords with real voices singing real melodies. But, the heart and the energy with which they are sung, is really why people are talking, and why so many sing along. They are a reality in a world of entertainment built with smoke and mirrors, and when they play, the common man can break the mirrors and blow the smoke away, so that all that’s left behind is the unwavering beauty of the songs. That’s the commotion, that’s the celebration, and wherever The Avett Brothers are tonight, that’s what you’ll find.

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Gallagher in Slow Motion

Fiction Product Test 001: Gallagher vs The Phantom Miro in High Speed High speed video of things being smashed sure are cool. They get even cooler when you b...

It's about to get all sorts of messy... and funny... at The Haunt on February 13th! The one and only GALLAGHER will be telling jokes and smashing Wegmans Ithaca Friendly Organic Fruit Live on Stage! On Sale TODAY! Watch the madness to come in S L O W M O T I O N...

Shemekia Copeland

Acoustic Blues

While the rest of the music industry is sleeping we are announcing NEW SHOWS! 2 today... The NEW "Queen of the Blues" Shemekia Copeland will play The Haunt on February 14th - What a voice!

Big Week Ahead! Saturday: The Blind Spots with Sammus and The Falconers at The Haunt Gonna be a party! Happy Holidays everyone!

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P.O. BOX 736
Ithaca, NY 14851