EVENTS

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Bodega Bamz & ZelooperZ

Apr 18

Apr 18

Doors open at 9:00 pmAges 16+ Only

Price: $25

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

Danny Brown is a Detroit MC who embraced his unique hood/hipster personality, took full advantage of social media, and -- fueled by his experiences with drug dealing and drug taking, as well as a wicked sense of humor -- delivered some of the most vivid and side-splitting rhymes of his era. Brown (real last name: Sewell) surfaced during the mid-2000s as a member of Reser’vor Dogs. The group advanced far enough to get the attention of the Roc-A-Fella label; a deal was not struck, but an A&R rep assisted Brown with the recording and release of a mixtape, Detroit State of Mind. New York recording sessions placed him in the company of several contemporaries, including G-Unit's Tony Yayo. In 2010, Yayo and Brown released Hawaiian Snow, while Brown also released The Hybrid, among other mixtapes, such as additional volumes of the Detroit State of Mind series. While it was rumored that Brown would be signing to G-Unit, label head 50 Cent allegedly balked due to the rapper’s fashion sense (including a preference for skinny jeans). Brown eventually linked with the Fool’s Gold label, where he issued XXX, his highest-profile mixtape up to that point. At the end of 2012, Brown announced that the follow-up to XXX had been recorded. Originally titled ODB, it was continually pushed back by the label, with Brown tweeting in August 2013 that he would consider leaking the release. In October, the re-titled album -- now called Old -- appeared with guest appearances from A$AP Rocky, Schoolboy Q, and others.

The Hangar - Ithaca, NY

with Riley Etheridge Jr

Apr 23

Apr 23

Doors open at 7:00 pmAll ages

Price: $40

Event Information

Tickets are available online or in person at The State Theatre Box Office (105 West State St, Ithaca) and McNeil Music of Ithaca (110 West Green St, Ithaca)

The ultimate rock & roll session man, Leon Russell's long and storied career includes collaborations with a virtual who's who of music icons spanning from Jerry Lee Lewis to Phil Spector to the Rolling Stones. A similar eclecticism and scope also surfaced in his solo work, which couched his charmingly gravelly voice in a rustic yet rich swamp pop fusion of country, blues, and gospel. Born Claude Russell Bridges on April 2, 1942, in Lawton, OK, he began studying classical piano at age three, a decade later adopting the trumpet and forming his first band. At 14, Russell lied about his age to land a gig at a Tulsa nightclub, playing behind Ronnie Hawkins & the Hawks before touring in support of Jerry Lee Lewis. Two years later, he settled in Los Angeles, studying guitar under the legendary James Burton and appearing on sessions with Dorsey Burnette and Glen Campbell. As a member of Spector's renowned studio group, Russell played on many of the finest pop singles of the 1960s, also arranging classics like Ike & Tina Turner's monumental "River Deep, Mountain High"; other hits bearing his input include the Byrds' "Mr. Tambourine Man," Gary Lewis & the Playboys' "This Diamond Ring," and Herb Alpert's "A Taste of Honey."

Look Inside the Asylum Choir In 1967, Russell built his own recording studio, teaming with guitarist Marc Benno to record the acclaimed Look Inside the Asylum Choir LP. While touring with Delaney & Bonnie, he scored his first songwriting hit with Joe Cocker's reading of "Delta Lady," and in 1970, upon founding his own Shelter Records imprint, he also organized Cocker's legendary Mad Dogs and Englishmen tour. After the subsequent tour film earned Russell his first real mainstream notoriety, he issued a self-titled solo LP, and in 1971 appeared at George Harrison's Concert for Bangladesh following sessions for B.B. King, Eric Clapton, and Bob Dylan. After touring with the Rolling Stones, Russell increasingly focused on his solo career, reaching the number two spot with 1972's Carney and scoring his first pop hit with the single "Tight Rope." While the success of 1973's three-LP set Leon Live further established his reputation as a top concert draw, response to the country-inspired studio effort Hank Wilson's Back was considerably more lukewarm, as was the reception afforded to 1974's Stop All That Jazz. 1975's Will O' the Wisp, however, restored his commercial luster, thanks in large part to the lovely single "Lady Blue."
Wedding Album In June of 1975, Russell married singer Mary McCreary; the following year the couple collaborated on The Wedding Album, issued through his newly formed Paradise Records label. Also in 1976, the Russell-penned "This Masquerade" earned a Grammy Award for singer George Benson. He and McCreary reunited for 1977's Make Love to the Music, and upon completing the solo Americana, Russell teamed with Willie Nelson for 1979's Willie & Leon. He then spent the next two years touring with his bluegrass band, the New Grass Revival, issuing a live LP in 1981; although Paradise shut down later that year, the label was reactivated for 1984's Hank Wilson, Vol. 2 and Solid State. Russell spent the remainder of the decade largely outside of music and did not resurface until issuing the Bruce Hornsby-produced Anything Can Happen in 1992. The album appeared to little fanfare, however, and another long period of relative inactivity followed prior to the 1998 release of Hank Wilson, Vol. 3: Legend in My Time. Face in the Crowd appeared a year later. Moving into the new century, Russell issued Moonlight & Love Songs, an album of cover songs, in 2002, followed by Angel in Disguise five years later in 2007. A trio of releases, Almost Piano, Bad Country, and In Your Dreams, appeared in 2008.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Big Mean Sound Machine

Apr 26

Apr 26

Doors open at 8:00 pmAges 16+ Only

Price: $15

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

If you’ve been paying attention, you’ll know that Kings And Queens is a synthesis of every aspect of John Brown’s Body’s storied career. It’s as if, after close to two decades of existence, this pioneering band has finally crafted their ultimate statement, tying together styles they’ve dabbled in, paid respect to, created, or pushed forward into one tightly woven mosaic. JBB’s Future Roots is now present tense.

John Brown’s Body formed (in Boston in the mid 1990s) at a time when there wasn’t what you’d call a U.S. reggae scene. The American bands that played reggae were regional at best, touring little, and many were primarily cover bands of the best known Jamaican reggae. JBB was one of a handful of groups that began touring nationally and created distinctly American reggae, steeped in traditional vibes but incorporating elements from other genres. Whereas most groups tackled typical reggae themes –religion and marijuana – JBB acted more like an indie band, writing songs that used the vocabulary of reggae to express their own experiences. Over time, this style has become the norm. The U.S. scene has grown tremendously – to the point of having two bands debut records in the Billboard Top 20 in 2012 – and many in the genre point to John Brown’s Body as a key influence.

However, this is not your typical story of an influential band doing what they did 20 years ago now trying to cash in on the movement they helped foment. Because a funny thing happened along the way for John Brown’s Body – they evolved and grew, taking their music ever forward, and have continued to influence the scene as much today – some might even say more so today – than they did at the start. The band’s relentless touring schedule helped pave the way for the nationwide scene, showing other bands that it was okay to be from the Northeast and still be comfortable playing in California, Hawaii, Colorado or Iowa. Early on, members of the band formed their own record label to highlight their local scene, which has since become the norm in many pockets of the scene. JBB delved deeply into dub effects from the start, incorporating elements of electronic music well before that became standard for today’s bands. Yet, JBB is somehow still utterly unique within the scene, even after two decades at work, which brings us back to the record at hand.

Musically and lyrically, lead singer/songwriter Elliot Martin has crafted a work that seems both self-reflective and visionary. A song like “Old John Brown” is obviously open to interpretation that Martin is commenting on both the man for whom the band is named after, as well as the legacy of the band itself. Musically, the song evokes riddims Burning Spear used in the 1970s, which has been an undercurrent influence on the group since the beginning, but has rarely surfaced as obviously as it does here since the band’s earliest breakthrough records.

The group’s last full-length record, Amplify (#1 on the Billboard Reggae chart in 2008), was extremely forward-thinking, steeped in electronic effects. Last Fall’s JBB IN DUB EP (#1 on iTunes’ Reggae Chart) stripped things down to the bedrock elements of reggae. Kings And Queens utilizes the best aspects of both these records, while bringing back much more of the classic JBB sound into the mix and production. This is reinforced by working with engineer Matt Saccuccimorano, who worked on some of the band’s earliest successful albums, and the involvement on numerous songs by former guitarist/keyboardist Nate “Silas” Richardson. Bassist Nate Edgar continues to astonish with his nimble and muscular bass lines. The bass and drums have always been at the center of Martin’s songwriting, but in Edgar and founding drummer Tommy Benedetti, he has found his most spectacular partners-in-crime. Martin has crafted his strongest batch of songs ever, coupled with startling horn lines written by the JBB Horns. Saying the JBB Horns are an influential bunch is no small talk, considering past alums have gone on to play for Slightly Stoopid as well as form the eclectically amazing band Rubblebucket.

The most obvious touch point for the band’s sound has always been classic UK reggae, especially the work of Aswad, Steel Pulse and Dennis Bovell, and that unmistakable influence permeates every track, most noticeably in the heavy drum and bass and complicated horn lines. As it was in that scene, JBB’s songs are more focused on sufferation, urban realities and overcoming, with songs like “Plantation,” “Empty Hands,” and “The Battle” sparking protest over haunting minor chords. This is not beach resort reggae. This is reality. However, the record is by no means all gloom and doom! Songs like “Shine Bright” and the love song “Fall On Deep” both add lightness, and even in his darkest metaphors, Martin can find hope and positivity (listen to the chorus of “Plantation” for evidence of that).
Kings And Queens is bookended by three songs (“Step Inside” and “Invitation” at the start and “Searchlight” at the end) that invite listeners into the live arena where this band has excelled from the beginning. Evoking sound systems from the music’s origins in 1960s Jamaica as well as JBB’s own powerful live show, these songs remind all listeners about the strength in numbers found in the reggae community, especially at live shows and festivals, and how John Brown’s Body has long been one of the greatest live acts in the genre.

This record shows that John Brown’s Body continues to lead from the front of the pack. They look forward by looking back and find a way to invite JBB fans from all eras into their packed and sweaty tent. As the opening song says, “So many people / Step inside, step inside / Come one and all / Got to make the dancehall tight.”

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Awkwafina, Celestial Shore, Nick Hennes

Apr 29

Apr 29

Doors open at 7:00 pmAll ages

Price: $15

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

By turns cuddly and chaotic, San Francisco's Deerhoof mix noise, sugary melodies, and an experimental spirit into sweetly challenging and utterly distinctive music. The group began as the brainchild of guitarist Rob Fisk and drummer/keyboardist Greg Saunier in 1994; early releases, such as the 1995 7"s Return of the Woods M'Lady and For Those of Us on Foot, had a more traditionally harsh, no wave-inspired sound, though they also included the quirky tendencies that dominated their later efforts. Vocalist/bassist Satomi Matsuzaki joined the group in time for 1996's self-titled double 7" on Menlo Park, but other members passed through Deerhoof, including Chris Cooper of Angst Hase Pfeffer Nase. The following year they released their full-length debut, The Man, the King, the Girl, on Kill Rock Stars and the Come See the Duck 7" on Banano a year later.
Holdy PawsFisk left Deerhoof after 1999's Holdy Paws, an experiment that saw the band trying to write songs that favored composition over individual sounds, and pursued similar ideas in his solo work and in Badgerlore. Halfbird, which was recorded before Fisk departed, was released in 2001, after John Dieterich was recruited as Deerhoof's new guitarist. That year the group also released the My Pal Foot Foot 7", a cover of the legendary Shaggs song that also appeared on the Better Than the Beatles tribute. In 2002, the group released the critically acclaimed Reveille; 2003's Apple O' followed soon after, and also featured auxiliary guitarist Chris Cohen. Their fifth album, the much more cohesive and focused Milk Man, appeared in spring 2004. The following year was another busy one for the band: not only did they embark on tours of the U.S., Europe, and Japan, but they released the Green Cosmos EP, the full-length Runners Four, and a Deerhoof tribute album that was only available on the band's website.
Friend Opportunity In 2006, the group toured with the Flaming Lips, the Fiery Furnaces, and Mary Timony, among others. That spring, Cohen left Deerhoof to concentrate on the Curtains, and that fall, a ballet based on Milk Man was performed in North Haven, ME. During that time, the band recorded its own songs and collaborated with composer Ed Shearmur on the music for Dedication, a film directed by Justin Theroux. The concise yet eclectic Friend Opportunity arrived in early 2007. Guitarist Ed Rodriguez joined the band in early 2008, and played on that year's Offend Maggie; prior to the album's release that fall, the band gave away one of its songs, "Fresh Born," as sheet music so fans could make their own versions of the song. Starting in 2010, Deerhoof began leaking songs from their next album on different media outlets, creating a kind of musical scavenger hunt for fans leading up to the 2011 release of their tenth studio album, Deerhoof Vs. Evil. The band's eleventh album Breakup Song, another short-and-sweet set of songs like Friend Opportunity, appeared in September 2012.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Rusty Belle

Apr 30

Apr 30

Doors open at 8:00 pmAges 16+ Only

Price: $12

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

When future music historians look back at the strong currents circulating between the Americas in the 21st century, they will find Los Lobos, Calexico, and a charismatic, lanky Missourian singing tight harmony with a Southern belle rattling the jawbone of a donkey. David Wax and Suz Slezak form the artistic core of the David Wax Museum, and together with multi-instrumentalist Greg Glassman, fuse traditional Mexican folk with American roots and indie rock to create a Mexo-Americana aesthetic. Combining Latin rhythms, infectious melodies, and call-and-response hollering, DWM was hailed by TIME for its “virtuosic musical skill and virtuous harmonies” and has built a reputation among concertgoers all over the U.S, Canada, Europe and China for “kicking up a cloud of excitement with their high-energy border-crossing sensibility” (The New Yorker). With the release of Knock Knock Get Up (September 2012), David Wax Museum has reached a level of cross-cultural integration and musical fluency that allows them to speak electrifying and heartfelt poetry with a tongue that is wholly their own.

Knock Knock Get Up is a fiercely original, rhythmically undeniable love letter to the Museum’s growing global audience. It’s peppered with field recordings and natural sounds from the city of Santiago, Tuxtla in the Mexican state of Veracruz. From deep in sun-drenched southern Mexico where most of the album’s songs were conceived, the earliest version of Knock Knock Get Up traveled all the way to the frozen winter landscape of the Great North Sound Society in southern Maine. The album is the band’s second made in collaboration with producer Sam Kassirer (Josh Ritter), and was recorded in a month-long marathon at Kassirer’s rustic farmhouse studio in January 2012. The Wax Museum’s fourth LP is a mature and playful evolution of the band’s sound: classical Mexican strumming patterns are translated onto electric guitars sporting halos of fuzz; the leona, a deep-voiced traditional Mexican guitar plays licks like an old-time, stand-up bass; and the track “Vivian” was first written as a bluegrass hoedown before it grew a Caribbean inspired accordion hook and a Brazilian drum part in the studio. With an expanded musical palate of autoharps, organs and mariachi trumpet loops, Knock Knock Get Up is gritty, intoxicating and vibrantly lush.

David Wax Museum’s eclectic sound has deep roots in Mexican and American soil. On several trips south of the border, including a yearlong Harvard fellowship, David Wax has immersed himself in the country’s rich traditional music culture, son mexicano, learning from the form’s living masters. Suz Slezak was homeschooled by her father on a small farm in rural Virginia, and reared on music – old time, Irish, classical, and folk. The two met in 2007 and began blending their unique musical perspectives to form the band.

The bonfire of success David Wax Museum has kindled with its innovative, grass-roots approach is currently roaring. After years busking at house concerts and touring with The Avett Brothers, the Carolina Chocolate Drops, and the Old 97s, DWM picked up the 2010 Boston Music Awards Americana Artist of the Year. In 2011 they released their second album, the acclaimed Everything Is Saved. The album’s single “Born with a Broken Heart” won the BMA’s Song of the Year. But critical mass came with the band’s breakout performance at the 2010 Newport Folk Festival, an opportunity won by DWM fans in an online competition. NPR called their concert at Newport a highlight of the entire weekend, Bob Boilen of All Songs Considered filed their sound under “pure, irresistible joy”, and the Museum was invited back to Newport to play the 2011 main stage. With an illustration in The New Yorker, #8 on Paste Magazine’s list of the Best Live Acts of 2011, and a nod from TIME magazine as one of the top ten acts of 2011’s South by Southwest, David Wax Museum has become one of the hottest new indie bands around.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Second Dam

May 2

May 2

Doors open at 8:00 pmAges 16+ Only

Price: $10

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

This all original, female-fronted, five-piece moxy rock band from Ithaca, NY is driving hard at bigger things and has been busy building an airtight justification for all the buzz surrounding it, both in its hometown and throughout the region. The band gets better and better, with its solid-as-a-rock rhythm section, eclectic library of keyboard sounds, and bold and inventive electric guitar stylings. Electrifying lead vocalist and force of nature Maddy Walsh can hang with the best of them, continuing to reach new heights with her voice at every show and on every recording.

Walsh possesses that easily recognizable raw talent that makes each Blind Spots show an experience that audience members walk away raving about. There are only so many female rock vocalists throughout history to reference when drawing vocal comparisons, meaning that Walsh has heard the “Janis” comparison all too many times. “I sound nothing like Janis!” she says. “I love Janis to death, but I have very little in common with her vocally. When people see a female vocalist having that much fun commanding the stage, she’s all that comes to mind. It’s a giant compliment, but it’s a shame we don’t have more rockin’ ladies to look to. The tides are shifting, though, which is awesome. Talented women are popping up all over the place… so people better listen up,” she says grinning. More recently Walsh’s voice has been compared to Adele’s, Grace Potter’s, Edie Brickell’s and Bonnie Raitt’s, but given the style of music she’s chosen to sing—not to mention her original lyrics, derived from a background in poetry—none of those references hit the mark. “I just wanna sound like Otis Redding,” she says. “Doesn’t everyone?”

It’s clear that the band is no longer a baby; the group has matured at an incredible rate, but its members all attest that the recent recognition they’ve garnered comes not from luck but from some seriously hard work. “We’ve put in have a lot of hours together,” says lead guitarist and co-founder Mike Suave. “We’re lucky to have a group of such dedicated people working toward a common goal and all thinking about the future.” It’s the dedication to writing new material and rehearsing, the refusal to slow down, and the shared love of the music they make together that continues to propel The Blind Spots forward and set them apart.

Since the release of their debut album, El Camino Dream [2010], a well-loved tight and inspired ten-song collection that showcases the band’s energy and expansive creativity, The Blind Spots have played a handful of the northeast’s well-renowned clubs and have been invited to play at a number of summer festivals, including the Sterling Stage Folk Fest [http://www.sterlingstage.com] and the Finger Lakes GrassRoots Festival of Music and Dance [www.grassrootsfest.org], where they packed the Cabaret Hall so tightly that some of their proud family members couldn’t squeeze in.

In a musical-minded town, virtually teeming with talented artists, The Blind Spots have really had to earn their notoriety in Ithaca. “It’s a great place to come from if you’re a serious musician,” says Walsh. “It’s a good training ground.” Ithaca serves now as a supportive springboard that allows The Blind Spots to catapult into new areas, and they plan to continue expanding their radius.

Since their 2011 performance at GrassRoots they’ve enjoyed gracious reception on some larger stages, including the Homer Center for the Arts, and at colleges, including the University of Vermont and SUNY Brockport.

The band has recently recorded at both Electric Wilburland Studios in Newfield, NY with Will Russell, who mastered El Camino Dream, and at Pyramid Sound in downtown Ithaca with Alex Perialas. Keep an eye on The Blind Spots, as they are on their way to winning the hearts of new devotees.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Miss Tess & The Talkbacks

May 3

May 3

Doors open at 8:00 pmAges 16+ Only

Price: $12

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

The energy of rock n’ roll is impossible to categorize – mercurial, specific to its beholder and profoundly reflective. From the Binghamton, New York music scene comes Driftwood, a band with a rock n’ roll soul and a folk art mind. Carving out a name for themselves with electrifying live performances, they bring one of the most unique, raw sounds to the Americana/roots music scene. Incorporating upright bass, banjo, acoustic guitar and violin, the ghost of traditional American folk music lives in their palette. But the melodies, the harmonies and the lyrics are something else entirely. “We started off playing rock in high school. Then studying jazz and classical music in college. Then we dove headfirst into folk and bluegrass. At some point I guess we kind of met in the middle”, says guitarist/songwriter Dan Forsyth. Drawing on aspects of everything from 0ld-time recordings to 1960’s R&B, the music is crafted to serve the songs. With fast-growing audiences singing along at live shows, it’s easy to tell the primary focus is on song. “We recognized early on that one of our strongest points was songwriting. The greatest songs transcend genre and time and this was one of the motivating ideas behind the band at the start”, says banjo player/songwriter Joe Kollar. Trading lead vocals between Forsyth, Kollar and violinist Claire Byrne, the group’s stage dynamics are as captivating as the songs. “I give so much of myself when I play because I deem it necessary in order to do the music justice”, says Byrne, whose violin-shredding performances galvanize fans. Songs or shredding, “There’s a reason people won’t let them off the stage”, says Jess Novak from The Syracuse New Times.
Coming from a town not often recognized for music but predominantly for industry, being the home of Twilight Zone author Rod Serling and donning the title of the “Carousel Capital of the World”, it’s easy to wonder how this not-so-traditional string band came out of the Binghamton music scene. “What people don’t often realize is that bands like Old Crow Medicine Show, The Horseflies and The Highwoods String Band came out of this same area and had a huge influence on us”, says Forsyth. “We played a lot of old-time in the beginning and it was a huge part of our band learning to play music together”.
Formed in 2005, the band spent four years playing just about anywhere they could. “We just wanted to be able to play for any crowd and turn heads”, says banjo player Joe Kollar. “We played everywhere. Coffee houses, bars, churches, rock clubs, Bluegrass festivals and the streets…a lot on the streets. We didn’t make any money, but what we learned was invaluable”.
After the release of their Debut CD “Rally Day” in 2009, the band has spent most of the last 4 years on the road. With club and festival appearances alongside of artists such as Bela Fleck, Old Crow Medicine Show, Rusted Root, Del McCoury, Brett Dennen, The Wailers, Railroad Earth, Robert Randolph, Rubblebucket, Leon Russell, Emmylou Harris and Donna the Buffalo, Driftwood is making serious waves on the East Coast scene. In the last three years they’ve played over 475 shows. With the release of their second CD “A Rock & Roll Heart” in 2011, the band landed spins on a slew of great radio shows and stations such as WFUV’s Sunday Breakfast with John Platt (New York, NY); KZSU (Stanford, CA), WCBE (Columbus, OH), WNRN (Charlottesville, VA), WUNC (Chapel Hill), NC and WDVX (Knoxville, TN).
In November 2012, Driftwood started work on their third and latest CD. Despite a grueling tour schedule and very little time at home, the recordings were finished in the summer of 2013. The self-titled new disc was recorded in a church outside of Ithaca, NY with Grammy-winning engineer Robby Hunter. It is set to be released on December 3rd, 2013.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Peter Bruntnell

May 6

May 6

Doors open at 8:00 pmAges 16+ Only

Price: $20

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

As a founder of alternative country pioneers Uncle Tupelo, as a solo artist, and as the leader of Son Volt, Jay Farrar’s work often seeks out the ghosts of America’s discordant or forgotten past, converses at length with them, and writes songs that stake a claim to a better future. Most recently, Farrar has added One Fast Move Or I’m Gone: Music From Kerouac’s Big Sur (F-Stop/Atlantic), a collaboration project with Benjamin Gibbard of Death Cab For Cutie, to his long list of critically acclaimed albums.

For many years, Farrar’s songwriting has been inspired and influenced by Kerouac’s compositional style. He called upon this inspiration when writing the songs for One Fast Move Or I’m Gone by pulling passages directly from the Kerouac’s Big Sur and putting them to music with Gibbard. These songs were then used in the documentary about Kerouac of the same name.

Son Volt’s most recent release, American Central Dust (Rounder), marks the apotheosis of both the Son Volt dynamic and the rigorous aesthetic that distinguishes Farrar’s entire body of work, in which classic and contemporary elements are fashioned into arresting new shapes. In the classic sense, the new album exhilaratingly carries on the tradition of the Byrds, the Flying Burrito Brothers, Little Feat circa Sailin’ Shoes, the Rolling Stones of Exile on Main Street and early R.E.M.

“The approach was to get back to more fundamental themes, both lyrically and musically, to make a more focused record,” Farrar explains. “The Search was more about expanding the scope in terms of song structures and instrumentation. This time around, I was going for a kind of simplicity, even in the structure of the songs. I probably learned that from listening to Tom Waits, where simplicity can be a virtue.”

These songs are the modern-day aural equivalent of the photographs of Walker Evans, Robert Frank and William Eggleston: sharply observed yet compassionate images of the telling details of everyday life during hard times. Several of them play out as psychological travelogues, as Farrar captures moods in motion. “I suppose I gather ideas for my songs while on the road,” he says, “but there’s also always the consciousness there that the songs are gonna be played on the road, so it’s intertwined.”

May 19

May 19

Doors open at 6:30 pmAges 16+ Only

Price: $15

Event Information

A benefit for the Cayuga Waterfront Trail Initiative to support the completion of the 6 mile Cayuga Waterfront Trail.



The Steel Wheels have captured audiences across the country with their heady brew of original soulful mountain music and their deep commitment to roots and community. Based in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, this dynamic four-piece string band marries old-time musical traditions with their own innovative sound and lifestyle, generating a truly magnetic revival.

The Steel Wheels is an amalgamation of hard work and easy rapport. The band is renowned for their raw energy and chemistry on stage, where they often cluster tightly around a single microphone to adorn Trent Wagler’s unmistakable tenor with bell-clear four-part harmonies inspired by their shared Mennonite heritage. Add to this Eric Brubaker’s evocative fiddle, Brian Dickel’s grounded upright bass, and Jay Lapp’s signature mandolin style, and it’s no surprise that The Steel Wheels have enthralled the contemporary Americana scene.

Their breakout album, Red Wing (2010), garnered critical praise and enjoyed tremendous success on the radio. It spent 13 weeks on the Americana Music Association’s Top 40 Chart, where it reached the number 15 slot, and cracked the Euro Americana Chart top 10. The Steel Wheels were nominated for five Independent Music Awards in 2010, with “Nothing You Can’t Lose” taking top honors as Best Country Song. Following 2011's release, Live at Goose Creek, The Steel Wheels continued to take the Americana scene by storm with their album, Lay Down, Lay Low (2012), which lingered for 10 weeks on the AMA’s Top 40 Chart and was the 2012 Americana Album of the Year from the Independent Music Awards. Additionally NPR Music named “Rain in the Valley” their Song of the Day, marveling that the “heavy hymn […] is sparse and dense all at once.” 2013 brought yet another Americana charting release entitled, No More Rain.

The Steel Wheels are selling out venues from coast to coast and appearing at many of the top festivals in the US & Canada. These include Merlefest, Bristol Rhythm & Roots, Ann Arbor Folk Festival, Stagecoach, Fayetteville Roots Festival, Moab Folk Festival, Musikfest, Walnut Valley Festival, Canmore Folk Festival, Gettysburg Bluegrass Festival, Riverhawk, Kerrville Folk Festival, and many others. 2014 shows no signs of slowing down with a full schedule of prestigious festivals and venues. In 2013 the band hosted their own annual Red Wing Roots Music Festival (www.redwingroots.com) that brought over 40 bands to 4 stages for 3 days of music & community. In addition as the schedule allows, the band organizes and perform the SpokeSongs bicycle music tour, during which the band members tow their instruments, equipment, and merchandise from one show to another via bicycle. Past tours have spanned up to 11 days, 600 miles, and 10 shows. The attention from these special SpokeSongs tours allow the band to raise extra money and awareness for charities and causes along the way.

As the band thrives, so do their partnerships with local businesses, artisans, and charitable organizations. The values portrayed in their music—devotion to roots, community, and family—are a way of life for The Steel Wheels, and this is reflected in everything from production process and booking agency to merchandise and touring. The band’s merchandise represents a host of grassroots connections to people and businesses. Lucas Roasting Company, located just outside of Harrisonburg, created “Halfway to Heaven” dark roast coffee in honor of their friends The Steel Wheels. Blue Mountain Brewery, located on Afton Mountain in Virginia, hosted the band when they were just getting started and now cans and bottles a multi-state distributed “Steel Wheels ESB.” T-shirts and printing needs are locally sourced and their one of a kind ceramic mugs are made by a potter friend, Justin Rothshank. Each product is intimately woven into the bands' narrative. The Steel Wheels are proof that music remains a viable and sustaining force for connection in our world.



“What sets The Steel Wheels from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia apart from many bands is the combination of their stellar instrumentals, accentuated by the one of a kind lead vocal of Wagler, and keenly supported by strong harmonies. Eric Brubaker on fiddle, Jay Lapp on mandolin, and Brian Dickel on bass weave in and out intricately throughout this record, painting vivid imagery which flows effortlessly, just teasing the lyrics enough to allow them to resonate within you.” -- Country Standard Time

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls

May 23

May 23

Doors open at 5:00 pmAll ages

Price: $45-$60

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Brand New

Advance tickets will be $45.00 Camping is available for 1000 people at $15.00 each in advance. Tickets go on sale Friday March 7 at 10AM.

May 24

May 24

Doors open at 5:00 pmAll ages

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

May 24

May 24

Doors open at 8:00 pmAges 18+ Only

Price: $12

Event Information

Looking like a man from leaner and meaner times, Willie Watson steps on stage with a quiet gravitas. But, when he opens his mouth and lets out that high lonesome vocal, you can hear him loud and clear.

His debut solo album, Folk Singer Vol. 1, was produced by David Rawlings at Woodland Sound Studios, the studio he co-owns with associate producer Gillian Welch in Nashville, TN, over the course of a pair of two-day sessions, for their own Acony Records label. The album spans ten songs from the American folk songbook ranging from standards like “Midnight Special,” “Mexican Cowboy” and Richard “Rabbit” Brown’s “James Alley Blues” to the more obscure, like Memphis Slim’s 12-bar blues, “Mother Earth,” Gus Cannon and the Jug Stompers’ “Bring it With You When You Come,” Land Norris’ double-entendre kids chant, “Kitty Puss” and St. Louis bluesman Charley Jordan’s sing-song “Keep It Clean.” Like the music, Willie can be murderous, bawdy or lustful, sometimes in the course of a single song, with a sly sense of humor that cuts to the quick. He counters a masterful bravado with the tragic fragility of one who has been wounded.

“There’s a lot of weight in the way Willie performs,” says Rawlings, longtime friend and producer of Watson’s previous band, Old Crow Medicine Show. “He’s had some tragedy in his life, which has informed his art. There’s an emotional edge to what he does because of who he is as a human being. He’s the only one of his generation I listen to who can make me forget these songs were ever sung before.”

Born in Watkins Glen, N.Y.—best-known for its race track and the rock festival of the same name which took place there, featuring the Allman Brothers, Grateful Dead and The Band—Watson grew up listening to his father’s basement record collection, including Bob Dylan and Neil Young, before stumbling on a Leadbelly album at the age of 12. Combined with having heard plenty of local string bands—featuring old-time banjo and fiddle—Willie experienced an epiphany.

“As soon as I heard that record,” he recalls, “I was hooked.”

With a voice that could quaver in the operatic style of his favorite, Roy Orbison, Willie went on to discover North Carolina Appalachian fiddle and banjo players Tommy Jarrell and Fred Cockerham, who played songs like “Cripple Creek,” “Sugar Hill” and “John Brown’s Dream” on a compilation cassette of “round peak style” music. He began to unearth Folkways albums, including the label’s groundbreaking 1952 Harry Smith compilation, Anthology of American Folk Music, which helped kick-start the ‘60s folk revival lovingly captured in the Coen brothers’ Inside Llewyn Davis. He discovered like-minded souls in Old Crow Medicine Show.

“When we started that band, I found people that were cut from the same musical cloth,” he says. “They were my age, into the same thing, going down a similar road. We started sharing our influences, trading records and playing together.”

A few years down that road, Watson’s work with Old Crow is already a large part of the reason that banjo and guitar driven music is heard everywhere in the air these days. On Folk Singer, we find Willie defending his musical turf. A true solo album in every sense, Watson is now center-stage, armed with an acoustic guitar, banjo and the occasional mouth harp. Indeed, hearing Watson’s skillful and subtle banjo and guitar accompaniments and soaring vocals unadorned for the first time is a revelation.

“Part of me always toyed with this idea of going it alone,” he explains. “I had to relearn some things, how to fill out all that space.”

Watson takes the skeletons of these songs and breathes his own life into them, on stage and on record.

“Midnight Special” is a standard that has been covered by everyone from Big Bill Broonzy to Creedence Clearwater Revival, the ultimate train song.

“Leadbelly’s version was my inspiration. I didn’t even know Creedence did it.”

“Long John Dean” is a banjo song alternatively known as “Long John Green” (by Grand Ole Opry star Uncle Dave Macon) and “Lost John” (Dick Burnett and Leonard Rutherford) with elements of “From Bowling Green,” a ‘20s WC Handy vaudeville number.

“I learned that from Bascom Lamar Lunsford. I’ve heard a couple other versions, including one from ‘Little Hat’ Jones, a blues guitar player. It had different verses, a slightly different melody and arrangement. I love the great rhyme at the end over that crooked tune.”

“Stewball” is a folk song about a supposedly real-life 18th century Irish race horse that ran in England, alternatively known as Skewball, a folk song that has been covered by the likes of Peter, Paul and Mary and The Hollies. “Mother Earth” is a slow, grinding 12-bar blues recorded by Memphis Slim in 1951 about the inevitability of death (“Mother earth may be waiting for you/But there’s a debt you got to pay.”)

“Memphis Slim is playing piano on this one with Willie Dixon on bass. It’s just that slow-drag blues. There’s this little piano line in between the verses that I transferred to guitar.”

“Mexican Cowboy” has been covered by the likes of Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Cisco Houston and Bob Dylan, among many others, under a variety of names, including “The Hills of Mexico,” “Boggus Creek” and “The Buffalo Skinners,” about a group of cowboys hired at the now abandoned Fort Griffith, Texas, to work cattle in New Mexico.

“I got that from Roscoe Holcomb, it’s one of those true ‘high lonesome’ sounds. Those minor chords in there are real intriguing.”

“James Alley Blues” was recorded by the New Orleans-born Richard “Rabbit” Brown and included on Harry Smith’s Anthology, where Willie first heard it. It’s a dark-laced song with a humorous chorus that talks about women troubles in no uncertain terms. (“How do you want me to love you/If you keep treating me so mean?”)

“I love singing that blues. It’s blues therapy at its best.”

“Rock Salt and Nails” is a song written by Utah Phillips, though he has denied it because of its rather dour attitude towards women. Dave Rawlings, who remembered hearing it from Dave Van Ronk, played it for Willie years ago, when he and Gillian Welch were on tour with Old Crow. It has been covered by the likes of Flatt and Scruggs, Joan Baez and Waylon Jennings.

“I got the whole song in one listen. I’ve been singing it for quite a while at night when I’m home alone. The first half will get you crying, but by the end, you’re laughing.”

“Bring it With You When You Come” was composed by Gus Cannon for his Jug Stompers in 1930. The jug band standard has been covered by both David Bromberg and the Siegel-Schwall Band, among others. “Kitty Puss” was a song by Land Norris, a banjo player from Georgia who made records in the early ‘20s before electric microphones.

“Norris did a lot of children’s songs with silly, nonsense lyrics that could be read many ways. This one seems to be about a cat who’s going to die because his tail’s on fire in the basement.”

“Keep It Clean” is a song written by St. Louis blues singer Charley Jordan, who worked extensively with big Joe Williams in the early to mid-‘30s, discovered by Willie on Maryland record collector Joe Bussard’s Down in the Basement compilation CD. A video of Watson performing the song in the Pointer Brand overall factory at the recent Bristol Rhythm and Roots was webcast by Live and Breathing.

“It sounds like it could be dirty, but then the chorus comes along and you’re singing about Coca-Cola.”

According to Watson, making the album “happened naturally… as soon as I was playing solo, I started remembering all these old tunes which led me to dig through my 78’s for more. When we got in the studio, I just played everything a couple times. It reminded me of making OCMS, where a lot of times we’d just play songs and let Dave sort it out.”

It is worth mentioning that the songs selected for this volume are not easy reads, not a simple matter to put across. These timelessly natural performances create a classic album that bears the invisible thumbprint of a master craftsman.

One pundit called Watson “Bob Dylan without the nasal whine or pretension,” but Willie is a lot more humble than that.

“I try to take songs I can relate to and that I can sing with urgency, that I can feel,” he says. “I’m just happy if people dig it.”

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Mill Bastards and The Newman Brothers

May 24

May 24

Doors open at 8:00 pmAges 16+ Only

Price: $12

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

Mephiskapheles is back in red and black for 2014. The band that invented the devilish, whimsical MTV- and radio-friendly genre of satanic ska, then defied critics by exploring even greater possibilities for its darkly original ska fusion, has reunited with a new tour and new album in the works.

Formed in the East Village of New York City in early 1991 by a group of punk rockers/artists/ad-agency employees/jazz musicians, Mephiskapheles played its first show on Long Island. From day one, the band began attracting a diverse, dedicated fan base.

Sold-out NYC gigs led to tours with the Buzzcocks and GWAR, and hits on the Hawaiian Islands Chart with three singles from the band's first album, 1994's God Bless Satan, produced by Bill Laswell.

While touring relentlessly, Mephiskapheles followed-up in 1997 with Maximum Perversion, a jazz-influenced work that didn't take long to be hailed as a classic. A deal in 1999 with Koch Records resulted in the band's hard-hitting, exploratory third album, Might-Ay White-Ay.

Flash-forward to today with Satanic Ska being, without a doubt, the genre of music most relevant to our current times. Fronted by riveting lead singer Invidious (the artist formerly known as The Nubian Nightmare), along with the hottest rhythm section in New York, and the Horns of Hell, Mephiskapheles has picked up where it left off, with an ongoing reissue program, a focused touring schedule, and a new album around the corner.

The Bug Jar - Rochester, NY

Jun 11

Jun 11

Doors open at 7:00 pmAges 18+ Only

Event Information

The Features are a psychedelic rock outfit that plays fresh, off-kilter pop that sounds like a head-on collision between Ray Davies and Elvis Costello with the Elephan 6 Collective picking up the pieces and putting them back together in the American South. Formed in the small, hidden town of Sparta, Tennessee, guitarist and vocalist Matt Pelham, bassist Roger Dabbs, keyboardist Parrish Yaw, and drummer Rollum Haas began playing their quirky and contagious pop as The Features around Pelham's colorful personal ruminations. Their self-titled debut EP, released in 1997, drew heavily on thick keyboards and an original, updated new wave sound. The Beginning EP -- a classicist pop record, at once as lush and sun-dappled as the Shins, and as pointed and probing as the Jam, followed with a U.K. release on Fierce Panda in 2003. The record was put out in the United States by Universal in March of 2004, with slightly altered tracking. Several other U.K. 7"s never saw a U.S. domestic release, but the The Beginning was finally unleashed stateside in March 2004. Exhibit A, The Features debut full length, was relesed in September of 2004 by Universal.

Bailey Hall - Ithaca, NY

Jun 13

Jun 13

Doors open at 7:00 pmAll ages

Event Information

Lucinda Williams and her band return to Ithaca after nearly 4 years. This amazing performance will take place in the beautiful and sonically perfect Bailey Hall on the Cornell University Campus.

$2 per ticket will be donated to the Finger Lakes Land Trust in support of their preservation efforts.

----------------------------------------

It’s not all that hard to find an artist who’s capable of offering a guided tour of life’s dark clouds – nor is it rare to come into contact with one who can hone in on the silver lining. But the ability to do both with equal grace, well, that’s an altogether rarer gift – and it’s one that Lucinda Williams displays with remarkable élan on her latest Lost Highway album, Blessed.

Blessed, recorded at the end of what Williams calls “a really big writing streak that gave me enough to make two albums,” brings those textures to play in some of the most straightforward songs she’s ever written. While it’s not a concept album as such, Blessed – recorded with producer Don Was – brings together a dozen masterfully-crafted pieces that fall into place beautifully, their welcoming sonic tenor offering an ideal foil for the conversational narrative that runs through the dozen short stories – tales that take in plenty of topical territory, but invariably end up offering the listener a sense of affirmation.

“Being married and feeling comfortable in my life, I’ve been able to go outside myself and write about other things,” she says. “I feel like this album, as a whole, is positive, but it’s not my so-called ‘happy’ album. Yes, I’m in love and I’m happy in my personal life. But my personal life isn’t the only focus. There aren’t all those unrequited love, ‘I’ve been shot down by a bad boy songs’ … well, there’s one of those … but there are songs about all sorts of things. It’s just a lot easier to stretch these days.”

The expanse of Williams’ palette is gradually revealed over the course of Blessed, a collection that unfolds in an origami-like fashion. The gentle plaint of “I Don’t Know How You’re Livin” – a stripped-to-the-bone track on which she uses the appealingly weathered edges to carve out a loving message of hope – gives way to the pedal-steel laced “Copenhagen”, a tender requiem for her late manager.

While that air of mortality imbues a few of Blessed’s songs – notably the fiercely slashing “Seeing Black,” on which Williams cuts through a hail of angry guitars that come courtesy of Elvis Costello, who makes a rare non-vocal cameo, with stark, poignant questions to a friend who chose to end his life, the album offers as many looks at the light at the end of the tunnel as it does glances into the abyss. “Kiss Like Your Kiss” exudes a sassy sensuality, while the closing “Sweet Love” is, quite simply, an aural incarnation of that title, pure, warm and sweet.

“I didn’t have a fully realized picture of what I wanted the album to sound like going in, but I hardly ever do,” says Williams. “Back when I was playing open mic nights by myself, I’d be sitting up there with my Martin guitar and doing ‘Angel’ by Jimi Hendrix or ‘Politician’ by Cream’ alongside Robert Johnson and Memphis Minnie songs. It never occurred to me to pick just one style. That’s stayed with me ever since. ”

Williams has never hesitated to wave that flag of iconoclasm, but she’s never used it as a shield. Ever since the release of her 1978 debut Ramblin’ on My Mind (recorded on the fly with a mere $250 budget behind her), the Louisiana- bred singer-songwriter has been ready, willing and able to call upon both her natural affinity for roots music and her familial literary tradition. She learned the importance of professional integrity around the same time most kids are learning their ABCs, thanks in large part to her award-winning poet father Miller Williams — who invested her with a “culturally rich, but economically poor” upbringing where artistic expression was of primary importance.

“Thanks to my dad, I grew up around poets and novelists and they all had families and normal lives and most of them didn’t achieve even nominal success until much later in life,” she recalls. “I have to keep reminding people that, yeah, I’m a musician, but first and foremost, I’m an artist and art is about expression, about expressing your feelings about what you’re going through every day. I think this is the closest I’ve come to capturing that essence completely as an artist.”

She’s never settled for any sort of pigeonholing, entering the ‘90s with the rich, sepia-toned Sweet Old World — a disc that, as much as any release, helped place the Americana movement at the forefront of listeners’ minds — and cementing her own spot in the cultural lexicon with 1998’s raw, immediate masterpiece Car Wheels on a Gravel Road. The latter disc earned Williams her first Grammy Award as a performer (she’d also scored one as a writer thanks to Mary-Chapin Carpenter’s version of her “Passionate Kisses”), but rather than try to capture the same lightning in a bottle a second time, she stretched her boundaries on 2001’s Essence, an album rife with both cerebral interludes and soul-stirring stomps.

In recent times, Williams has shown herself to be the kind of artist who’ll never back down from a challenge, whether collaborating with surprisingly kindred spirits like M. Ward and Flogging Molly or putting her own spin on iconic tunes like Bob Dylan’s “Positively 4th Street” and Jimmy Webb’s classic “Galveston”. She’s taken that same approach to her most recent recordings as a solo artist as well: The 2006 release West and 2008’s buoyant Little Honey – an album Paste hailed as “an album that brims with varied, impeccable writing” – made for an ethereal emotional travelogue that takes in both great loss and the sort of discovery one can only make when emotional barriers are taken down.

“People buy into this myth that once you’re quote happy unquote, you just die as an artist – that’s inane. It’s ridiculous,” she says. “People have actually asked me, ‘well, will you still be able to write now that your life is happy?’ That’s a somewhat pedantic point of view, the myth that happiness can’t be part of the backbone of creativity.

Indeed, she takes on a number of roles here, from the fallen fighter who narrates the whisper-soft elegy “Soldier’s Song” to the affably hard-nosed kiss-off specialist delivering “Buttercup.” But whatever the topic, Williams’ voice – both literally and figuratively – is unmistakable. It’s a voice that conveys experience without world-weariness, purity of spirit without naiveté – a combination that reaches its zenith on the album’s title track, a poignant acknowledgment of those who bestow blessings upon us each day, whether we know it or not.

“I had this image in my mind of how a stranger can affect you, and you them, at the same time,” she says. “We have this concept that someone who is less fortunate than we are in some way has nothing to offer us, and that’s not true at all. Everyone has a gift to give as long as you’re willing to accept it, from the girl selling flowers at a Mexican restaurant to the homeless man on the street. It’s all about the hope that there’s good in humanity if you look for it – which is really the feel of the whole album.”

By the time Blessed’s final notes resound, that hope will not only be clear, it’s likely to be passed on to the listener – paid forward in the most touching way.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Jun 20

Jun 20

Doors open at 9:00 pmAges 16+ Only

Price: $12

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

Simone Felice is a celebrated songwriter, author, and poet. He was born on 4 October 1976 in Palenville, New York, a small working-class hamlet in the Catskill Mountains.

At the age of twelve Simone suffered a brain aneurysm and was pronounced clinically dead for several minutes. Recovering from emergency brain surgery in a local hospital, he spent two months in intensive care, relearning basic motor skills, including reading and writing.

When he was fifteen he formed a punk band with friends, making weird noise-rock in his grandpa’s barn. Their emphasis was on head-banging and freaky storytelling. By eighteen, he had quit school to panhandle and play bars and low down clubs, including New York City's fabled CBGB.

It was around this time that Felice began writing poetry and vignettes, eventually leading to the publication of his first collection, The Picture Show, when he was twenty-two years old. He began performing these bizarre monologues regularly at the historic Nuyorican Poets Café in New York's lower east side, garnering the young poet invitations to read in London, Harvard University, San Francisco and Berlin.

In 2004 and then 2005 Simone's first works of short fiction were published: Goodbye Amelia, a coming of age story about a small-town girl with secrets to keep and a hunger to see the world, and Hail Mary Full of Holes, a fable noir about a runaway prostitute lost in the dawn of the Reagan era.

In the Fall of 2001, just after the attacks on New York City, Simone began writing songs with his brother Ian. Together they retreated to the woods they grew up in where, jobless with a cheap guitar, they wrote and made recordings (two collections know as The Big Empty and Mexico) with their friend Doc Brown. In this manner the two brothers clocked five years in complete obscurity, sewing the seeds of what would become (with the edition of their younger brother James in the Winter of 2006) The Felice Brothers, whose subsequent albums Through These Reigns And Gone, Tonight at the Arizona, The Felice Brothers, and Yonder is the Clock have garnered international praise, earning these Upstate New York natives an inarguable place in the Great American Songbook. Over the group’s early history, from starting out playing New York's subways and streets, to Radio City Music Hall and beyond, brother Simone has been one of it’s key lyricists and arrangers, co-writing some of the boys' most beloved songs, including Don’t Wake The Scarecrow, Frankie’s Gun, Run Chicken Run, Ruby Mae, Whiskey in My Whiskey, Love Me Tenderly, Hey Hey Revolver, Mercy, Wonderful Life, Your Belly In My Arms, The Devil Is Real, and Radio Song to name a few.

At the request of iconic record producer Rick Rubin (Johnny Cash, Tom Petty, Beastie Boys, Adele, et al), Simone flew to California in the late summer of 2008 to play drums on the Columbia Records release I and Love and You by The Avett Brothers. Lending his signature Catskill Mountain dirtbag swing to the Avett’s riveting songwriting and Rubin’s thoughtful production, Felice appears on some of the albums stand-out songs, including the title-track and lead single I and Love and You, which helped send the album to #1 in the Billboard folk charts

In the winter of 2009 personal tragedy reared its head when Simone and his long-time love lost their first child in a late-term miscarriage. It was then that he retreated to a cabin in the Catskill’s with old friend Bird and began writing and recording the songs that would (unknown to them at the time) become The Duke & The King’s album debut. Taking their name from the itinerant Shakespeare theatre grifters in Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn the project released its gripping Nothing Gold Can Stay in the Summer of 2009 to critical acclaim, being hailed as one of the most haunting and honest albums of the year. 2010's followup Long Live The Duke & The King has been similarly praised.

Felice's first novel, Black Jesus, was released by award-wining publisher Allen & Unwin (Atlantic Books/Faber&Faber) and Random House Germany. It tells the story of a young Marine shipped home to his nowhere town after being blinded in action by a homemade bomb, and the unexpected friendship he finds with a mysterious dancer who arrives one day fleeing darkness and violence of a different kind. Part love story, part protest of the broken promises lying at the heart of the American dream, Black Jesus is a passionate, twisted hymn to the marginalized and forgotten.

On 2 June 2010, after a series of fainting spells, Simone underwent emergency open-heart surgery at Albany Medical Center when doctors discovered that a childhood congenital disorder had left the thirty-three year old with an irreversible calcification of the aortic valve, leaving only 8% blood-flow to the body and brain. Just two weeks after the surgery he joined his brothers on stage at Pete Seeger's annual Clearwater Festival to help rid their beloved Hudson River of industrial waste. The following month his daughter, Pearl Simone Felice was born, a healthy blue-eyed girl who came in a summer thunderstorm.

In the subsequent years following his operation and Pearl's birth, with a new mechanical heart-valve ticking away the time, Felice did what it seems he's always done: He wrote songs. With a renewed clarity and sense of purpose, Simone bent to his new work, leaving behind any past monikers, in search of something pure, something truly his own.

April 2012 saw the release of his self-titled debut solo album, featuring songs such as New York Times, You & I Belong, and Charade which have become staple highlights in his live appearances. Among other accolades, Nick Hasted of The Independent called the record: 'A taut masterpiece of terrifying, exhilarating American tales.'

Simone's new full-length album, Strangers, (due out March 2014) is a ten song collection recorded in the Catskills with producer / friend David Baron, along with guest artists The Felice Brothers, Leah Siegel, and Wesley Schultz & Jeremiah Fraites of The Lumineers. Here is a body of work that truly captures Simone's rare gift as a poet, song-crafter, and unique visionary; an album certain to cement Felice’s place as one of the great songwriter-poets of his generation.

Recently Britain's esteemed Guardian newspaper commissioned Felice to write a personal memoir on the subject of his near-death experiences, first as a young boy, then as a grown artist, and how these two odd brushes with 'the other side' have influenced his work. The piece begins with a lyric from The Wizard Of Oz:
I would not be just a nuthin’, My head all full of stuffin’,
My heart all full of pain.
I would dance and be merry,
Life would be a ding-a-derry,
If I only had a brain...
Simone lives less than a mile from the creek-house he was born in, and travels his own country and abroad sharing his songs and stories

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Jun 27

Jun 27

Doors open at 9:00 pmAges 16+ Only

Price: $12

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

Off the beaten path, nestled in the deep gorges of Ithaca, New York, there are whisperings of a musical revolution in the air. The streets are abuzz as the cutting edge new school hip hop sound of The Gunpoets takes the scene by storm. Heavy bass, hard hitting drums, silky smooth keys and sexy guitar licks sweep audiences away as listeners find their bodies unable to resist the explosive rhythms. Add turntables and a microphone? Well, let's just say they won’t know what hit ‘em.

With partner in rhyme Jayhigh by his side, front man Rising Sun owns the stage and captivates the crowd at every twist and turn. To witness The Gunpoets in action is to see live rap music at its best! Their display of passion and energy is indeed a sight to behold. Powerful, positive, peaceful and at times political, they can work fans into a frenzy with one song and seduce them into a trance with the next. The Gunpoets seamlessly fuse hip hop with pop, rock, soul and funk to bring the world their own unique flavor. They have all the ingredients. Their recipe? Music with a message that inspires and uplifts the heart and soul.

The Gunpoets have shared the stage with artists and bands such as Arrested Development, Talib Kweli, Midnite, John Brown’s Body, Donna the Buffalo, Sim Redmond Band, and many more. They recently released their highly anticipated sophomore LP, "Come With Us", an album stuffed to the rafters with catchy tunes and cleverly crafted rhymes that showcases the bands versatility and musicianship. In 2010, their debut album "Shoot the Stars" won several local music awards, as well as the hearts of fans around the world. Whether they're on the road rocking crowds or in the lab working on their latest concoctions, they're making music around the clock and loving every minute of it.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Pale Green Stars

Jun 29

Jun 29

Doors open at 7:00 pmAges 16+ Only

Price: $15

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

The London Souls’ unique reinterpretation of classic hard-hitting rock and roll formulae recalls elements of the past with an ever-present boundless energy, fit to cement their place in the future. Tash and Chris have been nothing short of a best-kept secret among New York City concertgoers since the bands formation in 2008, building a fervent and dynamic fan base leveraged by their ever sustained reputation for consistently well-rehearsed and impassioned, explosive live performances. The band’s celebrated sound and spirit draws significant influence from the driving force of British rock pioneers Cream and Led Zeppelin to billowing and bouncing funk and soul, to the layered harmonies and memorable hooks of The Beatles and The Hollies, to the contemporary psychedelia of My Morning Jacket among many more.

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

Aug 3

Aug 3

Doors open at 4:00 pmAll ages

Price: $35-$50

Event Information

Old Crow Medicine Show got its' start busking on street corners in New York state and up through Canada, winning audiences along the way with their boundless energy and spirit. They eventually found themselves in Boone, North Carolina where they caught the attention of folk icon Doc Watson while playing in front of a pharmacy. He immediately invited the band to play at his MerleFest, helping to launch their career. Shortly thereafter the band relocated to Nashville for a residency at the Grand Ole Opry, where they entertained the crowd between shows.

It's been nearly fifteen years since these humble beginnings, and the band has gone on to tour the world, sell over 800,000 albums, become frequent guests on A Prairie Home Companion, and play renowned festivals like Bonnaroo, Coachella, and the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival. In November of 2011 Old Crow's classic single, "Wagon Wheel", received the RIAA's Gold certification for selling over 500,000 copies.

In 2011 Old Crow found themselves embarking on the historic Railroad Revival Tour with Mumford and Sons, and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. This tour had the bands riding a vintage train from California to New Orleans, playing shows along the way. The magic of this musical excursion across America's vast landscape is captured in the Emmet Malloy directed documentary, Big Easy Express. In 2013 Old Crow Medicine Show, along with Mumford & Sons and Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, won the Grammy Award for "Best Long Form Music Video" for the film.

Old Crow Medicine Show now have four studio albums to their name, three of which were released by Nettwerk Records - O.C.M.S and Big Iron World produced by David Rawlings, and Tennessee Pusher produced by Don Was. On their newest album, Carry Me Back, Old Crow continue to craft classic American roots music while pushing themselves in new directions. Carry Me Back, released by ATO Records and produced by Ted Hutt, represents a new stretch of road in the timeless journey of a rambling string band.

The Hangar - Ithaca, NY

Sep 18

Sep 18

Doors open at 7:00 pmAll ages

Price: $37.50

Event Information

Widely regarded as one of the most brilliant songwriters of her generation, Suzanne Vega emerged as a leading figure of the folk-music revival of the early 1980s when, accompanying herself on acoustic guitar, she sang what has been labeled contemporary folk or neo-folk songs of her own creation in Greenwich Village clubs. Since the release of her self-titled, critically acclaimed 1985 debut album, she has given sold-out concerts in many of the world’s best-known halls. In performances devoid of outward drama that nevertheless convey deep emotion, Vega sings in a distinctive, clear vibrato-less voice that has been described as “a cool, dry sandpaper- brushed near-whisper” and as “plaintive but disarmingly powerful.”

Bearing the stamp of a masterful storyteller who "observed the world with a clinically poetic eye," Suzanne’s songs have always tended to focus on city life, ordinary people and real world subjects. Notably succinct and understated, often cerebral but also streetwise, her lyrics invite multiple interpretations. In short, Suzanne Vega’s work is immediately recognizable, as utterly distinct and thoughtful, and as creative and musical now, as it was when her voice was first heard on the radio over 20 years ago.
Suzanne was born in Santa Monica, CA, but grew up in Spanish Harlem and the Upper West Side of New York City. She was influenced by her mother, a computer systems analyst and her stepfather, the Puerto Rican writer Egardo Vega Yunque. There was a heady mix of multicultural music playing at home: Motown, bossa nova, jazz and folk. At age 11 she picked up a guitar and as a teenager she started to write songs.

Suzanne studied dance at the High School for the Performing Arts and later attended Barnard College where she majored in English Literature. It was in 1979 when Suzanne attended a concert by Lou Reed and began to find her true artistic voice and distinctive vision for contemporary folk. Receptionist by day, Suzanne was hanging out at the Greenwich Village Songwriter’s Exchange by night. Soon she was playing iconic venues like The Bottom Line and Folk City. The word was out and audiences were catching on.

At first, record companies saw little prospect of commercial success. Suzanne’s demo tape was rejected by every major record company—and twice by the very label that eventually signed her: A&M Records. Her self-titled debut album was finally released in 1985, co-produced by Steve Addabbo and Lenny Kaye, the former guitarist for Patti Smith. The skeptical executives at A & M were expecting to sell 30,000 LP’s. 1,000,000 records later, it was clear that Suzanne’s voice was resonating around the world. Marlene on the Wall was a surprise hit in the U.K and Rolling Stone eventually included the record in their “100 Greatest Recordings of the 1980’s.” 1987’s follow up, Solitude Standing, again co-produced by Addabbo and Kaye, elevated her to star status. The album hit #2 in the UK and #11 in the States, was nominated for three Grammys including Record of the Year and went platinum. “Luka” is a song that has entered the cultural vernacular; certainly the only hit song ever written from the perspective of an abused boy.

The opening song on Solitude Standing was a strange little a cappella piece, “Tom’s Diner” about a non-descript restaurant near Columbia University uptown. Without Suzanne’s permission, it was remixed by U.K. electronic dance duo “DNA” and bootlegged as “Oh Susanne.” Suddenly her voice on this obscure tune was showing up in the most unlikely setting of all: the club. Suzanne permitted an official release of the remix of “Tom’s Diner” under its original title which reached #5 on the Billboard pop chart and went gold. In 1991 a compilation, Tom’s Album, brought together the remix and other unsolicited versions of the song. Meanwhile, Karlheinz Brandenburg, the German computer programmer was busy developing the technology that would come to be known as the MP3. He found that Vega’s voice was the perfect template with which to test the purity of the audio compression that he was aiming to perfect. Thus Suzanne earned the nickname “The Mother of the MP3.”

Suzanne co-produced the follow-up album with Anton Sanko, 1990’s Days Of Open Hand, which won a Grammy for Best Album Package. The album also featured a string arrangement by minimalist composer Philip Glass. Years earlier she had penned lyrics for his song cycle “Songs From Liquid Days.” Continuing to battle preconceptions, she teamed with producer Mitchell Froom for 1992’s 99.9F. The album’s sound instigated descriptions such as “industrial folk” and “technofolk.” Certified gold, 99.9F won a New York Music Award as Best Rock Album. Suzanne’s neo-folk style has ushered in a new female, acoustic, folk-pop singer-songwriter movement that would include the likes of Tracy Chapman, Shawn Colvin, and Indigo Girls. In 1997, Suzanne joined Sarah McLachlan on her Lilith Fair tour which celebrated the female voice in rock and pop. She was one of the few artists invited back every year. Suzanne was also the host of the public radio series “American Mavericks,” thirteen hour-long programs featuring the histories and the music of the iconoclastic, contemporary classical composers who revolutionized the possibilities of new music. The show won the Peabody Award for Excellence in Broadcasting.

In 1996, Vega returned with the similarly audacious Nine Objects Of Desire, also produced by Mitchell Froom, who by then was her husband. “Woman On The Tier (I’ll See You Through)” was released on the Dead Man Walking soundtrack. Over the years, she has also been heard on the soundtracks to Pretty In Pink (“Left Of Center” with Joe Jackson) and The Truth About Cats & Dogs, and contributed to such diverse projects as the Disney compilation Stay Awake, Grateful Dead tribute Deadicated, Leonard Cohen tribute Tower Of Song, and Pavarotti & Friends. In 1999, The Passionate Eye: The Collected Writings Of Suzanne Vega, a volume of poems, lyrics, essays and journalistic pieces was published by Spike/ Avon Books. In 2001, she returned to her acoustic roots for her first new album in five years, the critics favorite, Songs In Red And Gray.
In 2007, Suzanne released Beauty & Crime on Blue Note Records, a deeply personal reflection of her native New York City in the wake of the loss of her brother Tim and the tragedy of 9/11. But the record is not a sad one, per se, as her love for the city shines through as both its subject and its setting. In it, Suzanne mixes the past and present, the public with the private, and familiar sounds with the utterly new, just like the city itself. “Anniversary,” which concludes Beauty & Crime, is an understated evocation of that time in the fall of 2002, when New Yorkers first commemorated the Twin Towers tragedy and when Suzanne recalls her brother’s passing. It’s more inspiration than elegy, though: “Make time for all your possibilities,” Vega sings at the end in that beautiful, hushed voice. “They live on every street.” Produced by the Scotsman, Jimmy Hogarth and featuring songs such as “New York is a Woman” and “Ludlow Street,” Beauty & Crime is that rare album by an artist in her third decade; an album that is as original and startling as her first. Beauty & Crime won a Grammy for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical.

In 2006, she became the first major recording artist to perform live in avatar form within the virtual world Second Life. She has dedicated much of her time and energy to charitable causes, notably Amnesty International, Casa Alianza, and the Save Darfur Coalition. Suzanne has a daughter, Ruby, by first husband Mitchell Froom. Ruby, like Suzanne before her, attends the High School for the Performing Arts. Suzanne is married to lawyer/poet Paul Mills who proposed to her originally in 1983. Suzanne accepted his proposal on Christmas Day 2005, twenty two years later.

Suzanne Vega is an artist that continues to surprise. In 2011 in New York City she premiered Carson McCullers Talks About Love, an original play written and performed by Ms. Vega with songs she wrote with Tony Award-winner Duncan Sheik (Spring Awakening) A pioneer among singer-songwriters. Suzanne has also embarked on a project to re-imagine her own songbook in a stripped down and intimate manner, creating 4 new thematic albums that will be released over the course of 2010-2012 called the Close-Up series.

Ms. Vega continues to tour constantly, having just played dates with artists as diverse as Moby and Bob Dylan. Suzanne is planning US and European dates this spring and summer.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Sep 27

Sep 27

Doors open at 7:00 pmAll ages

Event Information

Kathleen Madigan is one of the most respected comedians of her generation; over her 25 year career Madigan has performed on nearly every standup television show ever made: Leno, Letterman, Conan, Ferguson and so on. Her third hour-long special, Madigan Again, which iTunes named one of the Best Comedy Albums of 2013, premiered exclusively on Netflix to rave reviews and is available on CD, DVD and download. She's released 5 CDs and 3 DVDs and starred in 1 Netflix special, 1 Showtime special, 2 HBO specials, 3 Comedy Central specials and 3 CMT Salute to the Troops specials with Ron White. For more information go to www.KathleenMadigan.com and follow Kathleen on Twitter - @KathleenMadigan

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Price: $49.50-69.50

Oct 10

Oct 10

Doors open at 7:00 pmAll ages

Event Information

Lily Tomlin is an award-winning star of stage and screen, known especially for comedic performances going back to her days on TV's Laugh-In in the early 1970s. She grew up in Detroit, but went to New York in 1965 to be a performer. Tomlin became a regular cast member of the comedy sketch show Laugh-In in late 1969, and soon became one of the most popular players, thanks to recurring characters such as Ernestine the telephone operator and Edith Ann, a sagacious five year-old. Tomlin left the show in 1973, having released two successful comedy records of her own, the Grammy-winning This Is A Recording (1971) and the Grammy-nominated And That's The Truth (1972, as Edith Ann). She's had a stellar career, one that includes an Oscar nomination for her performance in Robert Altman's Nashville (1975), as well as hit films such as The Late Show (1977), Nine to Five (1980, with Jane Fonda and Dolly Parton) and Flirting With Disaster (1996, starring Ben Stiller). She's won Emmys for writing TV specials in 1974, 1976, 1978 and 1981, and been a regular cast member on Murphy Brown (1996-98), The West Wing (2002-06), Damages (2010, the third season) and Desperate Housewives (2008-09). Her one-woman Broadway show in 1977, Appearing Nitely, earned a special Tony award, and she won another Tony for her performance in The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe, a 1985 one-woman show co-written with her longtime life and writing partner, Jane Wagner. A frequent stage performer who pops up in small TV and film roles, Tomlin is also a 2003 recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

with special guests Donna The Buffalo

Dec 5

Dec 5

Doors open at 7:00 pmAll ages

Event Information

From their days playing together as teenagers to their current acoustic and electric blues, probably no one has more consistently led American music for the last 50 years — yes! — than Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady, the founders and continuing core members of Hot Tuna.
The pair began playing together while growing up in the Washington D.C. area, where Jack’s father was a dentist and Jorma’s father a State Department official. Four years younger, Jack continued in junior high, then high school — while playing professional gigs as lead guitarist at night before he was old enough to drive — while Jorma (who had played rhythm guitar to Jack’s lead) started college in Ohio, accompanied his family overseas, then returned to college, this time in California.
Along the way, Jorma became enamored of, then committed to, the finger-picking guitar style exemplified by the now-legendary Rev. Gary Davis. Jack, meanwhile, had taken an interest in the electric bass, at the time a controversial instrument in blues, jazz, and folk circles.
In the mid 1960s, Jorma was asked to audition to play guitar for a new band that was forming in San Francisco. Though an acoustic player at heart, he grew interested in the electronic gadgetry that was beginning to make an appearance in the popular music scene — particularly in a primitive processor brought to the audition by a fellow named Ken Kesey — and decided to join that band; soon thereafter he summoned his young friend from Washington, who now played the bass.
Thus was created the unique (then and now) sound that was The Jefferson Airplane. Jorma even contributed the band’s name, drawn from a nickname a friend had for the blues-playing Jorma. Jack’s experience as a lead guitarist led to a style of bass playing which took the instrument far beyond its traditional role.
While in The Jefferson Airplane, putting together the soundtrack of the 60s, the pair remained loyal to the blues, jazz, bluegrass, and folk influences of the small clubs and larger venues they had learned from years before. While in San Francisco and even in hotel rooms on the road, they would play together and worked up a set of songs that they would often play at clubs in the Bay Area and while on the road, often after having played a set with the Airplane. This led to a record contract; in fact, they had an album recorded before they decided to name their band Hot Tuna. With it they launched on an odyssey which has itself continued for more than 35 years, always finding new and interesting turns in its path forward.
The first thing an early Hot Tuna fans discovered at their concerts of the early 1970s was that the band was growing louder and louder. In an era in which volume often overtrumped musicianship, Hot Tuna provided both. The second thing a fan would discover was that Jack and Jorma really loved to play. “Look around for another band that plays uninterrupted three- to six-hour sets,” wrote reviewer Jerry Moore. What Moore could not have known was that had there been no audience at all, they would have played just as long and just as well, so devoted were they to making music. Of course, the audience wasn’t superfluous by any means; it energized and continues to energize their performances. Album followed album — more than two dozen in all, not counting solo efforts, side projects, and appearances on the albums of other bands and performers — and they continued to develop their interests and styles, both together and in individual pursuits. In an era in which old bands reunite for one last tour, Hot Tuna can’t because Hot Tuna never broke up.
Along the way, they have been joined by a succession of talented musicians: Drummers, harmonica players, keyboardists, backup singers, violinists, mandolinists, and more, all fitting in to Jorma and Jack’s current place in the musical spectrum. And along the way there was no list of outstanding guitarists that didn’t include Jorma, nor was there anyone who seriously thought there is a better bass player than Jack.
After two decades of acoustic and electric concerts and albums, the 1990s brought a new focus on acoustic music to Hot Tuna. More intimate venues with a more individual connection to the audience became increasingly frequent stops. Soon, the loud electric sound (and the semi trailer load of equipment) disappeared entirely from Hot Tuna tours. Maturity brought the desire to do things not instead of but in addition to being a touring band. Both had become interested in teaching, passing along what they had learned and what they had uniquely developed to a new generation of players.
In 1998 Jorma and his wife Vanessa opened Fur Peace Ranch Guitar Camp, in the beautiful rolling Appalachian foothills of southeastern Ohio.
Here, on a sprawling and rustic yet modern campus, musicians and would-be musicians come for intensive and enjoyable workshops taught by Jorma, Jack, and other extraordinary players, learning things that range from different styles of playing to songwriting and even storytelling (the musician in performance has to say something while changing that broken string!), to making a song one’s own.
In addition, there is now BreakDownWay.com, a unique interactive teaching site that comes closest of anything yet to make individual instruction available to students anywhere there is a computer and an Internet connection.
But the teaching doesn’t replace Hot Tuna’s busy tour schedule; it’s in addition to the tours. Nor have they lighened up their individual schedules. Jack released his first solo CD, Dream Factor, on Eagle Records in 2003. He has a busy and elaborate website at jackcasady.com. Jorma has a website, too, and achieved enormous critical acclaim and a Grammy nomination for his 2003 solo album, Blue Country Heart. (Both are in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame due to their pioneering work in The Jefferson Airplane.) As 2006 began, they launched another exciting website, Hot Tuna Tunes, where fans may inexpensively download professionally made recordings of full Hot Tuna concerts in both MP3 and lossless encodings, suitable for portable player and home-burned CDs respectively. Hot Tuna Tunes is added to all the time, so it’s almost as if Hot Tuna were releasing numerous live concert albums every year. Collect the entire set!
For the last few years, Jorma and Jack have been joined in most of their Hot Tuna performances by the mandolin virtuoso Barry Mitterhoff. A veteran of bluegrass, Celtic, folk, and rock-influenced bands including “Tony Trischka and Skyline” and “Bottle Hill,” Barry has found a new voice in working with Hot Tuna, and the fit has been good — watching them play, it’s as if he’s been there from the beginning and they’re all having the time of their lives.
Jorma and Jack certainly could not have imagined, let alone predicted, where playing would take them. It’s been a long and fascinating road to numerous exciting destinations. Two things have never changed: They still love to play as much as they did as kids in Washington D.C., and there are still many, many exciting miles yet to travel on their musical odyssey.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Feb 14

Feb 14

Doors open at 7:00 pmAll ages

Event Information

Ira Glass is the host and creator of the public radio program This American Life. The show premiered on Chicago’s public radio station WBEZ in 1995 and is now heard on more than 500 public radio stations each week by over 1.7 million listeners. Most weeks, the podcast of the program is the most popular podcast in America. The show also airs each week on the CBC in Canada and on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s radio network.

Glass began his career as an intern at National Public Radio’s network headquarters in Washington, DC in 1978, when he was 19 years old. Over the years, he worked on nearly every NPR network news program and held virtually every production job in NPR’s Washington headquarters. He has been a tape cutter, newscast writer, desk assistant, editor, and producer. He has filled in as host of Talk of the Nation and Weekend All Things Considered.

Under Glass’s editorial direction, This American Life has won the highest honors for broadcasting and journalistic excellence, including several Peabody and DuPont-Columbia awards. The American Journalism Review declared that the show is “at the vanguard of a journalistic revolution.”

A television adaptation of This Ameri-
can Life ran on the Showtime network for two seasons, in 2007 and 2008, winning three Emmy awards, including Outstanding Nonfiction Series. The show has put out its own comic book, three greatest hits compilations, DVDs of live shows and other events, a “radio decoder” toy, temporary tattoos and a paint-by-numbers set. Half a dozen stories are in development to become feature films. In 2013 Ira Glass received the Medal for Spoken Language from the American Academy of Arts & Letters.

Glass is married and owns a disturbingly allergic dog

- Upcoming Highlights -

  • Ommegang_Modest_Mouse.jpg
  • danny-brown-preditah-remix2.jpeg
  • lr fb poster.jpeg
  • mm2.jpeg
  • t jeeps.jpeg
  • ocms.jpeg
  • haunt apr.jpeg
  • LU PosterSM.jpeg

- Spotlight Artists -

- Just Announced -

May 6

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Peter Bruntnell

May 23

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls

May 24

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Brand New

May 24

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

Jun 13

Bailey Hall - Ithaca, NY

Jun 20

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Aug 3

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

Sep 18

The Hangar - Ithaca, NY

- Social Updates -

On sale today at 10 - a perfect Ithaca fit and to benefit an Ithaca original - Finger Lakes Land Trust Lucinda Williams live with band at Bailey Hall June 13

ITHACA MASSIVE COME STRONG! John Brown's Body and Big Mean Sound Machine at the Haunt... 4/26 nuff said... respect - Buy in advance and save kiddos

white_logo.png

P.O. BOX 736
Ithaca, NY 14851