EVENTS

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Kris Orlowski

May 23

May 23

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $15

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian


Seattle-based five-piece rock combo Ivan & Alyosha are finally complete, having organically grown from the original duo of Tim Wilson and Ryan Carbary, adding Tim's brother Pete and Tim Kim, then drummer Cole Mauro as a full-time member for their sophomore Dualtone Records album, It's All Just Pretend, an uplifting exploration of the things that fuel their classic sound, steeped in the verities of family, faith and existential doubt. Their critically praised debut album, All the Times We Had was a perennial on several NPR tastemaker stations with an iTunes "Song of the Week" for "Running for Cover." Paste called their music "luscious, enjoyable folk-pop" and NPR Music praised their "Beatles-esque pop harmonies and sweet melodies," while Rolling Stone raved about their "smooth, soaring guitar pop" and American Songwriter said the band "achieve a polished west coast soul-folk sound that draws on the poppier sensibilities of McCartney songwriting." Ivan & Alyosha woodshedded for close to a year in making the new album in a variety of locations, from Carbary's own Seattle area condo home studio to first-album producer Chad Coplein's Black Watch Studios in Norman, Oklahoma and L.A.'s famed Sunset Sound with mixer/co-producer Joe Chiccarelli, who has worked with U2, My Morning Jacket, Elton John, The Shins, Etta James and The Strokes. The band, which originally took its name from two characters in Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov, has developed into a three-headed songwriting beast, with the Wilson brothers and Carbary carrying virtually an equal load on the new album. The eclectic 11-song effort takes off with the pure adrenaline of Pete's contributions, "Something Is Wrong" and "Bury Me Deep," highlighted by jangling guitars and pointed observations about freedom and personal responsibility in today's society. "As a songwriter, I feel a huge responsibility to be honest," says Pete Wilson. "And most of the time, that honesty comes at a price of digging down deep into my own faults, frustrations, and doubts. I've tried to write the protest song where I point the finger and place the blame elsewhere, but it never works out." He adds, "The goal is to hold up the mirror to our own shortcomings, and start asking, "how do I get out of the mess I've put myself in?" Tim's "All This Wandering Around," the first single, offers a haunted Roy Orbison-like croon featuring Tim Kim's swampy delta blues guitar break wrapped around a song of the search for a power greater than oneself, and the stumbles in finding it along the way. "There has to be honesty," says Tim. "Lyrically and thematically, our songs connect with people, no matter what they believe. We hopefully provide some sort of light, whenever – and wherever – they listen to them." According to Tim, the album title (which comes from Pete's song) depicts a modern world where reality is hidden behind materialistic illusions, illustrated in songs like his "Modern Man," a funky, '80s Bowie-meets-Hall & Oates R&B number that takes aim on our fetish for technology and outward appearances. "Somewhere on the journey long ago," he sings. "You lost your place," adding that we're "drowning in the ocean of your lowered expectations." Carbary's aching, self-lacerating songs explore harsh truths about relationships and domesticity with an eye towards traditional roots rock, evoking the piano balladry of Paul McCartney ("Tears In Your Eyes"), a bluesy four-on-the-floor shuffle punctuated with poppy "Penny Lane" horns ("Oh This Love") and a country gospel lament about relationships – one with a fellow human, the other a higher spiritual power -- featuring his own twangy slide guitar ("Drifting Away"). "I've always been a sucker for a heartbreak song," admits Ryan. "I'm mostly expressing my failures as a human being, and striving to become a better person. It's true emotion." That rawness and vulnerability can be heard on Tim's "Come Rain, Come Shine," a song that evokes one of George Harrison's blissful Buddhist mantras, a glimpse of our own communal nature, that we all occupy this earth together. "We wanted to come up with something that was universal," explains Tim, who co-penned the song with Nashville songwriter Dave Berg. "We wanted to bring things into perspective, with all of the nonsense going on in America and the world, that we're all part of this global community. All may be meaningless, but there are still things in the world that are meaningful. As a band, we try to err on the light, rather than the dark, side. We admit there are things we have yet to figure out, but instead of falling into easy cynicism, or self-absorption, though, we try to dig deeper." With four of the five band members married, and two of them with kids, family is an important consideration for Ivan & Alyosha. Tim deals with the topic openly on the closing lullaby to his then two-year-old son Henry, "Don't Lose Your Love," a wise counsel from a father to his child and wife, his fingers squeaking on the fret like a literal tug on the heartstrings. For all the members of I&A, as they pursue their musical ambitions, it is important that their personal lives remain grounded. "It can be difficult when we're on the road," says Ryan. "We're very grateful to have the kind of support we do from the loved ones back home" "Family informs just about everything we do creatively," nods Tim, a devoted father and husband who manages to keep the home fires burning whether on tour or recording. "It's an inspiring thing, for sure. We're all just trying to take care of each other. Rock bands don't usually deal with topics like family and spirituality, but these subjects are universal." On It's All Just Pretend, Ivan & Alyosha continue to make timeless music that shows that rock and domestic bliss can indeed co-exist, as they overcome any obstacles by the sheer joy of their roles -- not only as performers, but brothers, husbands, fathers and sons.

Water Street Music Hall - Rochester, NY

with special guest Craig Finn

May 26

May 26

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $25-$30

Event Information

16+ w/ ID. 


Presale is Wednesday, February 11 at 10am EST. 

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

General Admission Seated Event

May 29

May 29

Doors open at 6:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $18-$20

Event Information

This is a general admission seated event


Crystal's emotive folk-rock-country style has been catapulted from the cramped coffeehouses and cavernous subway tunnels of Chicago to millions of homes across America when she placed second Season 9 of American Idol. Along with her old soul of a voice, her care-free style and "don't mess with me" attitude set her apart from the other contestants and eventually landed the self-taught songstress performances with the like of the legendary Joe Cocker, Harry Connick, Jr., and Alanis Morrissette.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

May 30

May 30

Doors open at 9:00 pm Starts at 10:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $10

Event Information

Big Mean Sound Machine I-Town Revue: Featuring Ithaca's Finest Singers and Players


Big Mean Sound Machine will host a showcase of Ithaca’s amazing musical talent. Expect covers, classics and originals by a dynamic cast of singers and players. No Big Mean Originals, just all of the tunes that inspired us to make music! DJ GOURD and DJ Ha-MEEN spin tracks for your dancing feet. Mosaic Foundation Opens the Night! The Lineup (In No Particular Order): Tenzin Chopak (Rockwood Ferry) Tom Burchinal (Grey Gary, Ayurveda) Elliot Martin (John Brown’s Body, Black Castle) Stephanie Agurkis (Mutron Warriors) Kevin Kinsella (10Ft Ganja Plant, John Brown’s Body) Nate Richardson (Sim Redmond Band) Shikhar Bajracharya (Grey Gary, Ayurveda) Evan Freidell (Jimkata) Jon Petronzio (Road Man, John Brown’s Body) Wolf Weston (Second Dam) Brett Beardslee (Uncle Bumpy) The Steamboats and Many, Many More!!

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

with Mechanical River

Jun 3

Jun 3

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Hurray For The Riff Raff is Alynda Segarra, but in many ways it's much more than that: it's a young woman leaving her indelible stamp on the American folk tradition. If you're listening to her new album, 'Small Town Heroes,' odds are you're part of the riff raff, and these songs are for you.

"It's grown into this bigger idea of feeling like we really associate with the underdog," says Segarra, who came to international attention in 2012 with 'Look Out Mama.' The album earned her raves from NPR and the New York Times to Mojo and Paste, along with a breakout performance at the 2013 Newport Folk Festival, which left American Songwriter "awestruck" and solidified her place at the forefront of a new generation of young musicians celebrating and reimagining American roots music. "We really feel at home with a lot of worlds of people that don't really seem to fit together," she continues, "and we find a way to make them all hang out with our music. Whether it's the queer community or some fright train-riding kids or some older guys who love classic country, a lot of folks feel like mainstream culture isn’t directed at them. We're for those people."

Segarra, a 26-year-old of Puerto Rican descent whose slight frame belies her commanding voice, grew up in the Bronx, where she developed an early appreciation for doo-wop and Motown from the neighborhood's longtime residents. It was downtown, though, that she first felt like she found her people, traveling to the Lower East side every Saturday for punk matinees at ABC No Rio. "Those riot grrrl shows were a place where young girls could just hang out and not have to worry about feeling weird, like they didn’t belong," Segarra says of the inclusive atmosphere fostered by the musicians and outsider artists who populated the space. "It had such a good effect on me to go to those shows as a kid and feel like somebody in a band was looking out for me and wanted me to feel inspired and good about myself."

The Lower East Side also introduced her to travelers, and their stories of life on the road inspired her to strike out on her own at 17, first hitching her way to the west coast, then roaming the south before ultimately settling in New Orleans. There, she fell in with a band of fellow travelers, playing washboard and singing before eventually learning to play a banjo she'd been given in North Carolina. "It wasn't until I got to New Orleans that I realized playing music was even possible for me," she explains. "The travelers really taught me how to play and write songs, and we'd play on the street all day to make money, which is really good practice. You have to get pretty tough to do that, and you put a lot of time into it."

"The community I found in New Orleans was open and passionate. The young artists were really inspiring to me," she says. "Apathy wasn’t a part of that scene. And then the year after I first visited, Katrina happened, and I went back and saw the pain and hardship that all of the people who lived there had gone through. It made we want to straighten out my life and not wander so much. The city gave had given me an amazing gift with music, and it made me want to settle there and be a part of it and help however I could."

Many of the songs on 'Small Town Heroes' reflect that decision and her special reverence for the city. She bears witness to a wave of violence that struck the St. Roch neighborhood in the soulful "St. Roch Blues;" yearns for a night at BJ's Bar in the Bywater in "Crash on the Highway;" and sings of her home in the Lower Ninth Ward on "End of the Line." "That neighborhood and particularly the house I lived in there became the nucleus of a singer songwriter scene in New Orleans," she explains. "'End Of The Line' is my love song to that whole area and crew of people."

The scope of the album is much grander than just New Orleans, though, as Segarra mines the deep legacies and contemporizes the rich variety of musical forms of the American South for the age of Trayvon Martin and Wendy Davis. "Delia''s gone but I'm settling the score," she sings with resolute menace on "The Body Electric," a feminist reimagining of the traditional murder ballad form that calls on everything from Stagger Lee to Walt Whitman. Shejuxtaposes pure country pop with the dreams and nightmares that come with settling down with just one person in "I Know It's Wrong (But That's Alright)," while album opener "Blue Ridge Mountain" is an Appalachian nod to Maybelle Carter.

NPR has said that Hurray for the Riff Raff's music "sweeps across eras and genres with grace and grit," and that's never been more true than on 'Small Town Heroes.' These songs belong to no particular time or place, but rather to all of us. These songs are for the riff raff.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Contender for the title of greatest blues guitarist ever, with a fiery, screechy, super-quick technique that influenced countless followers.

Jun 5

Jun 5

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Buddy Guy is one of the most celebrated blues guitarists of his generation (and arguably the most celebrated), possessing a sound and style that embodied the traditions of classic Chicago blues while also embracing the fire and flash of rock & roll. Guy spent much of his career as a well-regarded journeymen, cited as a modern master by contemporary blues fans but not breaking through to a larger audience, before he finally caught the brass ring in the 1990s and released a series of albums that made him one of the biggest blues acts of the day, a seasoned veteran with a modern edge. And few guitarists of any genre have enjoyed the respect of their peers as Guy has, with such giants as Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck, Keith Richards, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and Mark Knopfler all citing him as a personal favorite. George "Buddy" Guy was born in Lettsworth, Louisiana on July 30, 1936, and is said to have first learned to play on a homemade two-string instrument fashioned from wire and tin cans. Guy graduated to an acoustic guitar, and began soaking up the influences of blues players such as T-Bone Walker, B.B. King, and Lightnin' Hopkins; as his family relocated to Baton Rouge, Guy had the opportunity to see live performances by Lightnin' Slim (aka Otis Hicks) and Guitar Slim, whose raw, forceful sound and over the top showmanship left a serious impression on Guy. Guy started playing professionally when he became a sideman for John "Big Poppa" Tilley, where he learned to work the crowd and overcome early bouts of stage fright. In 1957, Guy cut a demo tape at a local radio station and sent a copy to Chess Records, the label that was home to such giants as Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, and Etta James, shortly before buying a one-way train ticket and moving to Chicago, eager to make music his career. Hoodoo Man BluesGuy didn't enjoy immediate success in Chicago, and struggled to find gigs until his fiery guitar work and flashy stage style (which included hopping on top of bars and strutting up and down their length while soloing, thanks to a 100-foot long guitar cable) made him a regular winner in talent night contests at Windy City clubs. Guy struck up friendships with some of the city's best blues artists, including Muddy Waters, Otis Rush, Freddie King, and Magic Sam, and landed a steady gig at the 708 Club, where he became known as a talent to watch. In 1958, Magic Sam arranged for Guy to meet Harold Burrage, the owner of local blues label Cobra Records, and Guy was soon signed to Cobra's sister label Artistic Records. Willie Dixon produced Guy's debut single, "Sit and Cry (The Blues)," as well as the follow-up, "This Is the End," but in 1959, Cobra and Artistic abruptly closed up shop, and like labelmate Otis Rush, Guy found a new record deal at Chess. Guy's first single for Chess, 1960's "First Time I Met the Blues," was an artistic triumph and a modest commercial success that became one of his signature tunes, but it was also the first chapter in what would prove to be a complicated creative relationship between Guy and label co-founder Leonard Chess, who recognized his talent but didn't appreciate the louder and more expressive aspects of his guitar style. While Guy enjoyed minor successes with outstanding Chess singles such as "Stone Crazy" and "When My Left Eye Jumps," much of his work for the label was as a sideman, lending his talents to sessions for Muddy Waters, Koko Taylor, Howlin' Wolf, Little Walter, and many others. And one of Guy's definitive recordings of the '60s wasn't even issued by Chess; Guy had been performing occasionally with blues harpist Junior Wells, and Guy and his band backed up Wells on the 1965 Delmark release Hoodoo Man Blues, a masterful exercise in the Chicago blues style, with Guy credited as "Friendly Chap" on initial pressings in deference to his contract with Chess. I Left My Blues in San Francisco Chess didn't issue an album on Guy until the 1967 release of I Left My Blues in San Francisco, and when his contract with the label ran out, he promptly signed with Vanguard, who put out A Man and the Blues in 1968. As a growing number of rock fans were discovering the blues, Guy was finding his stock rising with both traditional blues enthusiasts and younger white audiences, and his recordings for Vanguard gave him more room for the tougher and more aggressive sound that was the trademark of his live shows. (It didn't hurt that Jimi Hendrix acknowledged Guy as an influence and praised his live show in interviews.) At the same time, Guy hadn't forsaken the more measured approach he used with Junior Wells; Buddy and Wells cut an album that also featured Junior Mance on piano for Blue Thumb called Buddy and the Juniors, and in 1972, Eric Clapton partnered with Ahmet Ertegun and Tom Dowd to produce the album Buddy Guy and Junior Wells Play the Blues. In 1974, Guy and Wells played the Montreux Jazz Festival, with Bill Wyman of the Rolling Stones sitting in on bass; the show was later released as a live album, Drinkin' TNT and Smokin' Dynamite, with Wyman credited as producer. Alone & Acoustic By the end of the '70s, Guy was without an American record deal, and his career took a hit as a result; while he recorded some material for specialist labels in Europe and Japan, and Alligator issued two collections in 1981, Alone and Acoustic and Stone Crazy, for the most part Guy supported himself in the '80s through extensive touring and live work, often appearing in Europe, where he seemed better respected than in the United States. Despite this, he continued to plug away at the American market, buoyed by interest from guitar buffs who had heard major stars sing his praises; in 1985, Eric Clapton told a reporter for Musician magazine, "Buddy Guy is by far and without a doubt the best guitar player alive...he really changed the course of rock & roll blues," while Vaughan declared, "Without Buddy Guy, there would be no Stevie Ray Vaughan." In 1989, Guy opened his own nightclub in Chicago, Buddy Guy's Legends, where he frequently performed and played host to other top blues acts, and in 1991, after a well-received appearance with Clapton at London's Royal Albert Hall (documented in part on the album 24 Nights), he finally scored an international record deal with the Silvertone label, distributed by BMG. Guy's first album for Silvertone, Damn Right, I've Got the Blues, featured guest appearances by Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Mark Knopfler, and featured fresh versions of several fan favorites as well as a handful of new tunes; it was the Buddy Guy album that finally clicked with record buyers, and became a genuine hit, earning Guy a gold album, as well as a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album. Guy wasted no time cutting follow-ups, releasing Feels Like Rain in 1993 and Slippin' In in 1994, both of which racked up solid sales figures and won Guy further Grammy Awards. Last Time Around: Live at Legends In 1993, Guy reunited with Junior Wells on the stage of his Legends club; it would prove to be one of Wells' last live performances, and the show was released in 1998, several months after Wells' passing, on the album Last Time Around: Live at Legends. While most of Guy's work in the late '90s and into the new millennium was the sort of storming Chicago blues that was the basis of his reputation, he also demonstrated he was capable of exploring other avenues, channeling the hypnotic Deep Southern blues of Junior Kimbrough on 2001's Sweet Tea and covering a set of traditional blues classics on acoustic guitar for 2003's Blues Singer. In 2004, Guy won the W.C. Handy Award from the American Blues Foundation for the 23rd time, more than any other artist, while he took home his sixth Grammy Award in 2010 for the album Living Proof. Guy also received the National Medal of the Arts in 2003, and was awarded with Kennedy Center Honors in 2012. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2005, with both Eric Clapton and B.B. King presenting him with his award, and in 2012 he performed a special concert at the White House, where he persuaded President Barack Obama to join him at the vocal mike for a few choruses of "Sweet Home Chicago." Guy continued his late-career revival with the 2012 memoir When I Left Home: My Story and the summer 2013 release of the ambitious, guest star-laden double album Rhythm & Blues.

Water Street Music Hall - Rochester, NY

Jun 8

Jun 8

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $22-$26

Event Information

16+ w/ ID

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

SOLD OUT

Jun 13

Jun 13

Doors open at 5:00 pm Starts at 7:30 pm All ages

Price: $65-$85

Event Information

CAMPING IS SOLD OUT


If you put your ear to the street, you can hear the rumble of the world in motion; people going to and from work, to school, to the grocery store. You may even hear the whisper of their living rooms, their conversation, their complaints, and if you’re lucky, their laughter. If you’re almost anywhere in America, you’ll hear something different, something special, something you recognize but haven’t heard in a long time. It is the sound of a real celebration.It is not New Year’s, and it is not a political convention. It is neither a prime time game-show, nor a music video countdown, bloated with fame and sponsorship. What you are hearing is the love for a music. It is the unbridled outcry of support for a song that sings to the heart, that dances with the soul. The jubilation is in the theaters, the bars, the music clubs, the festivals. The love is for a band.The songs are honest: just chords with real voices singing real melodies. But, the heart and the energy with which they are sung, is really why people are talking, and why so many sing along. They are a reality in a world of entertainment built with smoke and mirrors, and when they play, the common man can break the mirrors and blow the smoke away, so that all that’s left behind is the unwavering beauty of the songs. That’s the commotion, that’s the celebration, and wherever The Avett Brothers are tonight, that’s what you’ll find.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Jun 14

Jun 14

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $10-$13

Event Information

In 2013, The Howlin Brothers released HOWL, an album produced and released by Brendan Benson of The Raconteurs and his indie label Readymade. Shortly thereafter the media embraced this band fast and furiously with dozens of positive reviews and accolades about the sound and feel of this Appalachian style Old time string band.

The Howlin’ Brothers embarked on a national tour in 2013 to support HOWL and immediately followed that up with 2014’s TROUBLE. All of the feedback on their live performances has resonated immensely with music critics, fans and aficionados who represent a multitude of genres in today’s music. That is a mighty force to be reckoned with.

This is a live show that makes you feel good, makes you want to clap and dance and makes you realize how truly talented this trio is. The band will resume touring coast to coast across America in support of their latest release TROUBLE in 2015, also produced by Benson. We recommend you put your dancing shoes on and enjoy!

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

with Gilligan Moss

Jun 16

Jun 16

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Glass Animals vocalist and songwriter David Bayley draws influence for both music and artwork from his involvement in the world of medicine and neuroscience (at just 22 yrs old, he has studied both) creating a sound with it's roots spread between the electronic and live instrumentation. The result is the warm, narcotic space between a downbeat, slow-burning groove and electro-pop catchiness.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Jun 18

Jun 18

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $15-$20

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian


2014 was an explosive year for The Soul Rebels, riding high from touring four continents including Europe, Australia for the second year, debuting in China, selling out shows in New York City, collaborating with artists spanning from Joey Bada$$, Big Freedia, Lotus and String Cheese Incident to sharing stages with Kanye West, The Allman Brothers Band, Gary Clark Jr., John Mayer, Jack White, Dave Mathews and Disclosure. Closing out the year, The Soul Rebels returned home to record the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival’s official soundtrack, quoted by the iconic festival as “Soul Rebels, the soundtrack of Jazz Fest 2015”. How do you follow up a year like that? As only The Soul Rebels can, with a jam packed plan for 2015 featuring touring, collaborations, festival appearances, recording a new album and a 3-night annual residency with special guests at New York City’s Brooklyn Bowl. The Soul Rebels started with an idea shared between founding members Derrick Moss and Lumar LeBlanc – to expand upon the pop music they loved on the radio and the New Orleans brass band tradition they grew up on. They took that tradition and blended funk and soul with elements of hip hop, jazz and rock. Together with a group of young, like-minded musicians from all over New Orleans, they formed The Soul Rebels and set out to make their mark on the music they love. The band has settled on an eight-piece lineup that can be heard on their international debut release Unlock Your Mind. The Soul Rebels built a career around an eclectic live show that harnesses the power of horns and drums in the party like atmosphere of a dance club. When not touring, The Soul Rebels’ weekly show at New Orleans’ Le Bon Temps Roulé is known to erupt with the kind of contagious, shout-along musical mayhem that The Rebels bring with them wherever they perform. On their travels, The Soul Rebels have collaborated live and played with notable artists and bands including Metallica, Green Day, Maceo Parker, Galactic, Slick Rick, Trombone Shorty, Joey Bada$$, Prodigy of Mobb Deep, Big Freedia, The String Cheese Incident, Rahzel, Styles P of The Lox, Eric Krasno, Suzanne Vega and John Medeski as well as being billed on shows with Kanye West, Snoop Dogg, Alabama Shakes, Estelle, Cee Lo Green,Arcade Fire, Ice Cube, George Clinton, Shaggy and many others. The Soul Rebels have been a mainstay at festivals all over the world, from the stages at Bonnaroo and Outside Lands, to the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, to Electric Forest and Austin City Limits, to recent festival appearances at the Bryon Bay Bluesfest in Australia, Shanghai Jazz Festival in China and the Java Jazz Festival in Jakarta, Indonesia. The Soul Rebels continue to chart new territory as they combine topnotch musicianship and songs with grooves that celebrate life in the time-honored New Orleans style. "The Soul Rebels, New Orleans' finest brass ensemble..." -VICE “The Soul Rebels are the missing link between Public Enemy and Louis Armstrong.” -VILLAGE VOICE "New Orleans’ top-shelf brass ensemble The Soul Rebels...wind-wielding wizardry of New Orleans’ finest." OKAYPLAYER "Brace yourselves folks, these men are quickly solidifying themselves amongst NOLA's proud big brass elite... and seem intent to sublimate the homogenoustones of the contemporary urban music landscape with the lush instrumentation of our culture's root." -OKAYPLAYER "The Soul Rebels are rebelling against one, albeit detestable thing: starchy paint-by-numbers music." -VIBE

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

Jun 19

Jun 19

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $12

Event Information

PLEASE NOTE THIS IS A GENERAL ADMISSION SEATED EVENT


WE ALL WANT THE WORLD TO BE BEAUTIFUL.
We want scribes and songbirds to tell us so—and sometimes they do and then it is. They point their pens and focus their lens where they will and surprise us to our soul. On Your Own Love Again is a record that does it to us, with songs from a spine-thrilling new place and a gifted young singer with her own musical logic.


Jessica Pratt’s self-titled 2012 debut has been much-murmured about in the time between yesterday and today. People respond to the austere, pristine clarity of the performances, the gentle strength, marveling at how much comes from so little: just a voice and a guitar or two! They remark on the timeless nature of the songs and the voice, scrupulously informed by the folk-rock of ages past, but sung without bags (none in hand, nor beneath eyes). They speculate on just who is the personality behind this Jessica Pratt? It is hard not to respond to the sound of her music, not to want more right away.


Two years on, and Jessica’s very new On Your Own Love Again is here for us, playing her further adventures in different pastures. If they feel removed from the first songs, it may help to know that the recordings of the first album were made some years back with no expectation of making an album. They sat quiet on the shelf for a long time, appearing on the internet eventually. It all seemed harmless, but when Birth Records honcho Tim Presley rolled up in his long white limousine
and began to spin tales of folk rock glory, who was she to say no? Sure, Mr. Presley, fence me a record!


The nice part about learning that people dig your sound is that it gives you the chance to think of what else you’d do. After deep consideration, Jessica found new songs within her and an urgency to make another record, marked with a strong sense for rendering it exactly the way she heard it in her head, spending time with her tunes and crafting the smallest details. In this way, she truly was able to inhabit her own skin as a singer of her songs — and make On Your Own Love Again the first Jessica Pratt album constructed to be an album.


What makes On Your Own Love Again new? Everything, and yet everything woven so subtly into the presentation leaves you unaware that you have been modulated upon. The album was recorded entirely by Jessica in the fashion of “Night Faces” and “Dreams,” from her first album, and mixed in collaboration with Will Canzoneri. Touched lightly with additional instrumental and vocal parts, the songs ripple beneath the surface with lyrical details that morph almost subliminally from the personal
into fantasy. When Jessica’s playful nature bubbles up, she sends her voice traveling into strange places to see what it finds there. The music too is deceptively accomplished, providing subtle hallucinatory
nuances to the tunes. The orchestral organ stop working in the shadows of “Wrong Hand,” the reverberant percussion floating through “Game That I Play,” the clavinet panned out on the side in “Moon Dude,” Jessica’s sudden vocal dip into her lower register on “Greycedes”— all pull at the ears, highlighting her unique pop sensibilities with craft and humor, giving the album’s inherent romance a greater heft. Perhaps most significantly, On Your Own Love Again was recorded at home — at places in Los Angeles and San Francisco, over the past two years. This process sands the surface of her more active multi-tracking approach, allowing a sound as delicate and singular as her former recordings. On Your Own Love Again Jessica is fully alive in a space all her own; with isolation in the breeze, the sound resonant in the natural light and a gauze of clouds in the sky, under which she can relax, unwind and let herself be.


That’s everything we want from Jessica Pratt — On Your Own Love Again.

Academy of Music - Northampton, MA

Jun 21

Jun 21

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Phish bassist Mike Gordon returns to the road on the heels of 2014's Overstep, his fourth studio album. The band's new repertoire will be augmented by secret synesthetic mad scientist gadgetry on and around the stage.

Most artists have a fixed ritual or routine that they rely on to inspire their efforts from concept to fruition. Gordon tends to establish general goals, and then eschew routines for creative experiments. One of his goals for his latest album was to trust himself to relinquish control, which he accomplished by sharing songwriting duties and by handing over the producing reins for the first time in his solo career to Paul Q. Kolderie (Radiohead, Uncle Tupelo, Pixies).

The result is a diverse but tightly knit family of sturdy rock numbers that manages to sound grounded but sophisticated at the same time, and raw but carefully considered. Gordon draws inspiration from an astonishing variety of sources, from the natural world to the emotional world to his often persistent visions. Like Gordon himself, the album is full of contradictions, juxtapositions, and surprises - which is exactly what his fans expect.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Jun 21

Jun 21

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $15

Event Information

Age policy: 18+ with ID / under 18 with a parent or guardian

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Jun 24

Jun 24

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $12-$15

Event Information

To those who have seen the California Honeydrops, it may come as a shock that the young frontman, Lech Wierzynski, was born in Warsaw, Poland. The son of Polish political refugees raised in Chicago and Washington DC, Lech was exposed to a wide range of musical influences. “When my dad was growing up in communist Poland in the 40’s and 50’s, old American music was illegal and therefore very cool,” he says. “He passed on the love of old stuff to me: everything from Louis Armstrong to Sam Cooke." Like his early influences, Lech has the unique ability to carry a tune casually, conversationally and powerfully as well. But the California Honeydrops are not just another throwback band. “My brother and I had to assimilate to modern American society,” Wierzynski explains, “so we loved all the popular stuff on the radio too, especially Hip-Hop, R&B. Knowing music was our way of proving we were American.” After studying ethno-musicology at Oberlin College, Wierzynski arrived in Oakland, California in 2004. There, he couldn’t help but to continue expanding his musical horizons. “At first,” he recalls, “I played mostly on the street, and then as I got more established I started playing a lot of blues and soul music in clubs and touring. There is a rich heritage of that music here in the Bay, and I was lucky enough to play with a lot of older musicians who taught me what it was all about.” When Lech was ready to combine all his influences into one cohesive sound, he formed the California Honeydrops. By the time the band put out its first tip jar, at an Oakland train station, Lech had already established himself in the Bay Area music scene. “I had gigs, I wasn’t starving,” he explains. “But I wanted to get back to how I started out, playing on the street with friends, having fun, and putting smiles on peoples faces.” With these goals in mind, the California Honeydrops were formed. “Things got going really fast,” remembers drummer and founding member Ben Malament. “People who had seen us on the street were offering us all kinds of gigs. Before we knew it we were a working band, playing clubs parties, and dances all over.” In just few years time this group of street performers would be selling out venues across California and bringing its infectious sound to festivals across the US and Europe. With a background in West African and New Orleans drumming, Ben Malament has provided a funky rhythmic backdrop to Wierzynski’s soulful vocals and soaring trumpet playing since their subway busking days. The addition of saxophonist Johnny Bones brought to the band his influences from time working with Eddie Palmieri, Nell Carter, and Steve Lucky and the Rhumba Bums, to form the core of the group. Growing bigger and gathering steam, the Honeydrops have expanded from an acoustic street trio to a full band: piano and keyboards, electric bass, and additional percussion round out their sound. Beyond the band’s shared musical vision remains a greater purpose: to make people dance, sing, and enjoy themselves. The Honeydrops’ music speaks not just to the heart and soul, but also to the body; people have no choice but to dance. Drawing heavily on Southern soul and Bay Area R&B with a twist of New Orleans second-line street music, the Honeydrops defy genres. Their style may not have a name, but one thing is certain: The California Honeydrops don’t just play music. They throw parties.

The Smith Opera House - Geneva , NY

Jun 27

Jun 27

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Legendary singer-songwriter and social justice activist David Crosby is a two time Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, inducted as a member of both the iconic folk-rock band The Byrds — with whom he first rose to stardom — and the iconic Woodstock era-defining group Crosby, Stills & Nash. A native Californian-and son of an Academy Award-winning cinematographer-Crosby originally intended to be an actor when he moved from Santa Barbara to Los Angeles in 1960. Music prevailed, however, and Crosby began his career as a folksinger, playing clubs and coffeehouses nationwide. Back in L.A. in '63, Crosby formed The Byrds with Roger McGuinn, Chris Hillman, Gene Clark and Michael Clarke, winning widespread recognition for his songwriting and charismatic presence. Driven by hits including "Eight Miles High," "Turn! Turn! Turn!," and a cover of Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man," The Byrds' signature electric folk-rock influenced countless musicians to come. Crosby left The Byrds in 1967 to embark on a lifelong collaboration with Graham Nash and Stephen Stills. Renowned for vocal harmonies, stellar musicianship and timeless songs, Crosby, Stills, & Nash (CSN) have been called "the voice of a generation," and were GRAMMY-honored in 1969 as Best New Artist. The trio's self-titled debut album introduced classics including the Crosby-penned tracks "Guinnevere" and "Wooden Ships"—today, it is included on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Crosby continues to tour and record with CSN, as well as with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and as a duo with Graham Nash. As a solo artist, Crosby debuted with the 1971 masterpiece If Only I Could Remember My Name, recently reissued as a two-disc set featuring a 5.1 mix, video footage, and other bonuses. David Crosby also performs and records with CPR, the jazz-flavored trio he formed in 1995 with his son James Raymond and Jeff Pevar. Crosby's most recent release is 2004's Crosby-Nash, a 2-CD set with Graham Nash, their first as a duo since 1976's Whistling Down The Wire. Their debut LP together, '72's Crosby & Nash-featuring "Southbound Train" and "Immigration Man"-is regarded as one of the best side projects from the CSN&Y sphere. Their catalogue also includes 1975's Wind On The Water and the live gem Another Stoney Evening. Previously a CD-only release of a 1971 concert recording, the latter title is now available in digital and LP versions as the inaugural releases on Blue Castle Records, the independent label Crosby formed with Nash in 2011. Voyage, a 3-disc, career-spanning retrospective box set touching on all aspects of Crosby's oeuvre, was released in 2006. Crosby is also the author of three books including Stand and Be Counted: Making Music, Making History/The Dramatic Story of the Artists and Causes That Changed America, which underscores his commitment to social activism, and belief that artists and musicians are potent agents for change. Crosby's two autobiographical volumes are Long Time Gone and Since Then: How I Survived Everything And Lived To Tell About It. The latter, per Entertainment Weekly, chronicles, "A fascinating life worthy of a sequel."

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

Jul 22

Jul 22

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Dark Bird Is Home doesn't feel like it came from one time, one place, or one tape machine. The songs and sounds were captured in various countries, studios, and barns, and they carry a weather-worn quality, some dirt and some grit.
If you're a fan of The Tallest Man On Earth, Dark Bird pays real tribute to the old records you fell for, and goes new places you're going to love as well. If you're new to The Man: holy shit! Many would be jealous of your position. Enjoy these songs, and know there are 40 or more other gems waiting on earlier albums and singles.
Early in Dark Bird, toward the end of the opening track, we hear other voices and sounds backing Kristian Matsson's own. One of them, later credited in the liner notes with Angel Vocals, shows up several times throughout the record, adding new color to the familiar palette. And so the story grows and expands. That first song has horns and a piano, keyboards, synthesizers, and other modern noisemakers... and by track two you've got The Tallest Man on Earth as full-throttle rock and roll.
While Dark Bird is The Tallest Man at his most personal and direct, deeper and darker than ever at times, it's also an album with strokes of whimsy and the scent of new beginnings – which feels fresh for The Tallest Man on Earth, and well timed. Reliably, the melodies and arrangements are sturdy and classic, like old cars & tightly wound clocks. The lyrics and their delivery are both comforting and alarming, like tall trees & wide hills.
The other musicians and layers on this recording put a wide lens on familiar themes. Fear and darkness, sleep or lack of it, dreams in the dark and in the light. Moving, leaving, going. Distance and short stops, long straight lines, temporal places. More hopefully, a grateful nod to a traveling partner, a healing mind. Maybe a little forgiveness needed. Definitely some things to forget.
And of course, that last song. The title track. If there is a little legend-building to be done here, let it be this scene a few of the album's early-listeners can recount: Kristian gently warning them over their shoulder before track ten begins: "Watch out for this one."
You should expect the loudest and proudest sounds yet from The Tallest Man on Earth on album number four, but also the softest and the lowest. For the next few years, the Dark Bird tour will come to your city or a town nearby, and for the first time The Man is bringing a band to the stage with him.

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Sturgill Simpson

Jul 24

Jul 24

Doors open at 5:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $15-$40

Event Information

On September 17th, 2013 Old Crow Medicine Show received the great honor of being inducted as the newest members of the historic Grand Ole Opry. Other highlights from the year included winning the Grammy Award for "Best Long Form Music Video" for the film Big Easy Express, and having their classic single, "Wagon Wheel", receive the RIAA's Platinum certification for selling over 1,000,000 copies. The band got its' start busking on street corners in New York state and up through Canada, winning audiences along the way with their boundless energy and spirit. They eventually found themselves in Boone, North Carolina where they caught the attention of folk icon Doc Watson while playing in front of a pharmacy. He immediately invited the band to play at his MerleFest, helping to launch their career. Shortly thereafter the band relocated to Nashville for a residency at the Grand Ole Opry, where they entertained the crowd between shows. It's been nearly fifteen years since these humble beginnings, and the band has gone on to tour the world, sell over 800,000 albums, become frequent guests on A Prairie Home Companion, and play renowned festivals like Bonnaroo, Coachella, and the Newport Folk Festival. In 2011 Old Crow found themselves embarking on the historic Railroad Revival Tour with Mumford and Sons, and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. This tour had the bands riding a vintage train from California to New Orleans, playing shows along the way. The magic of this musical excursion across America's vast landscape is captured in the Emmet Malloy directed documentary, Big Easy Express. Old Crow Medicine Show now have five studio albums to their name, three of which were released by Nettwerk Records - O.C.M.S and Big Iron World produced by David Rawlings, and Tennessee Pusher produced by Don Was. In 2012 Old Crow released Carry Me Back, on which they continued to craft classic American roots music while pushing themselves in new directions. The band's newest album, Remedy, released by ATO Records and produced by Ted Hutt represents a new stretch of road in the timeless journey of a rambling string band.

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Lucius

Jul 26

Jul 26

Doors open at 5:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $15-$41

Event Information

THE DECEMBERISTS


WHAT A TERRIBLE WORLD, WHAT A BEAUTIFUL WORLD


CAPITOL


“In some ways, this album was four years in the making,” says Colin Meloy, frontman and primary songwriter of the Decemberists. “We were on hiatus, so we had all the time we could want, no schedule or tour, no expectations.”With the ability to work at their own pace, the resulting record, What a Terrible World, What a Beautiful World, is the band’s most varied and dynamic work, both musically and emotionally. Since their earliest recordings more than a decade ago, the Decemberists have always been known for their sense of scope and daring—from “The Tain,” an eighteen-and-a-half minute 2004 single based on an Irish myth to their last two ambitious, thematic albums, The Hazards of Love and The King is Dead. This time, though, Meloy explains that they took a different approach: “Let’s make sure the songs are good, and eventually the record will present itself.” The Decemberists—Meloy, Chris Funk (guitars), Jenny Conlee (keyboards), Nate Query (bass), and John Moen (drums)—had announced that they would be taking a break when their touring cycle finished following the release of 2011’s The King is Dead. Meloy wanted to spend time with his family and work on the children’s book series that became the acclaimed, best-selling Wildwood trilogy. To be sure, they had reached a new peak in their career: King entered the Billboard album charts at Number One, and the track “Down by the Water” was nominated for a Grammy in the “Best Rock Song” category.Even during the hiatus, the group remained visible: they released an EP of outtakes from the album titled Long Live the King; contributed the song “One Engine” to the Hunger Games soundtrack; and put out We All Raise Our Voices to the Air, a live album documenting their ferocious intensity on stage. They even had the honor of appearing in animated form on The Simpsons, and performed on the season six finale of Parks and Recreation.Mostly, however, Meloy was concentrating on the Wildwood series—the 1,500-page saga of two seventh-graders who are drawn into a hidden, magical forest,illustrated by his wife, Carson Ellis. So when the band reassembled in May 2013, the plan wasn’t to make an album in their usual way.“Typically we book four or five weeks in the studio and bang out the whole record,” says Meloy. “This time, we started by just booking three days, and didn’tknow what we would record. There was no direction or focus; we wanted to just see what would come out. We recorded ‘Lake Song’ on the first day, live, and then two more songs in those three days. And the spirit of that session informed everything that came after.” They reconvened in the fall and added some more songs. Gradually, over the course of a year and a half, the album came into focus. What was initially apparent was a fuller, richer sound. “There was a grandiosity to the songs in different ways,” says Meloy, citing Leonard Cohen’s 1977 collaboration with Phil Spector, Death of a Ladies’ Man, as a reference point. “We were layeringtextures, adding strings and dedicated backing vocals—the early songs created the peaks of the record, and that started to dictate the overall tone and tenor.”The first batch of songs, Meloy notes, represented the more personal side of his songwriting, a change from the strong narrative thrust that characterized much of the Decemberists’ work. “Writing books as this raw, fantastic narrator has been the outlet for that part of my brain,” he says. “Having a family, having kids, having this career, getting older—all of these things have made me look more inward. So some of these songs are among the more intimately personal songs I’ve ever written.”Perhaps most notable is “12-17-12,” a song named for, and inspired by, the date that President Obama addressed the nation following the Newtown school shootings, and read the names of the victims. “I watched that speech and was profoundly moved,” says Meloy. “I was hit by a sense of helplessness, but also the message of ‘Hold your family close,’ and this was my way of marking that for myself.” This bewildering, conflicted feeling came out in a phrase near the end of the song—“what a terrible world, what a beautiful world”—that gave the album its title.As the sessions continued, other elements of the writing and the sound surfaced and a more rounded picture emerged. “As soon as I finished the books, I immediately started writing more narrative songs,” Meloy says. “‘Cavalry Captain,’ ‘Carolina Low,’ those all started coming out. But there was a more subtle voice coming in; I wanted moments of levity, a little tongue-in-cheek. Also, we figured out that the big, pop sound we were making would also make the quieter moments more still, create more dynamic peaks and valleys.”Without a deadline, the Decemberists were also able to explore every song to completion. “Usually you have to let some songs slide because of time constraints,” Meloy says, “but nothing was relegated to the b-side pile, everything was given a fair shake. Which is a blessing and a curse—we ended up with 18 songs, and each had champions and detractors. There were a multitude of albums you could potentially make—somber, over-the-top pop, folk—and I think every band member would have created a different record.”Ultimately, What a Terrible World, What a Beautiful World found its final form, a distillation of the best things about this remarkable band. A new way of working led to a renewed excitement about the next chapter for the Decemberists. “I’ve never lived with a record for so long,” says Colin Meloy, “documenting my shifts and changes as a songwriter, with a real sense of time passing. And there’s something very freeing about working on music with absolutely no agenda, and just letting the songs become themselves.”


 


With Lucius

Water Street Music Hall - Rochester, NY

Jul 29

Jul 29

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $29-$75

Event Information

16+ w/ ID


 


VIP Soundcheck Party Early Entry. 


Soundcheck Party will start 90 minutes before doors at 5:30 pm and will last approx 45 min.  Please arrive 30 minutes prior. 


 


"Dweezil Zappa Guitar Masterclass- Dweezilla On The Road"


For The price of a fuzz pedal, learn techniques from the son of Frank Zappa


Dweezil Zappa's music camp Dweezilla has a motto "Learn And Destroy." It refers to destroying the boundaries that confine music creativity. At camp students are in total immersion for 4 days of music instruction. While on tour with Zappa Plays Zappa Dweezil will be previewing some of the guitar concepts he teaches at camp in a special event prior to each concert.

"I transformed my guitar technique before starting Zappa Plays Zappa out of necessity to play my dad's most sophisticated and challenging melodies. I've found a lot of exciting new approaches to the guitar. started Dweezilla music camp as a way to share this information with guitarists. I'm excited to present an opportunity to share thoughts on my approach to guitar with students of all levels before each show on tour."


MasterClass begins at 2:00 pm. Bring your guitars and arrive 30 minutes before the class begins

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Dinosaur Jr

Jul 31

Jul 31

Doors open at 5:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $15-$45

Event Information

"Tommy the Cat." "John the Fisherman." "Jerry Was A Race Car Driver." "My Name is Mud." "Wynona's Big Brown Beaver." Yessiree, Primus is responsible for some of the most cutting edge and original rock music of the 1990's. And now, the definitive Primus line-up - singer/bassist Les Claypool, guitarist Larry LaLonde, and drummer Tim Alexander - is back together and planning on getting the worldwide masses bobbing up and down in unison once more. Although originally formed in 1984, it was not until shortly before the end of the decade that the aforementioned classic line-up was solidified. With most hard rock/heavy metal acts at the time either neatly falling into either "thrash" or "glam" categories, Primus joined a variety of underground bands that refused to be pigeonholed (and by the early '90s, had fully infiltrated the mainstream) - merging metal, funk, alternative, punk, country, roots rock, and experimental music, along with Claypool's penchant for witty and often humorous storytelling lyrics. Building a large and loyal following first in and around San Francisco (before eventually, going global), Primus kicked things off with a string of releases that are now considered classic alt-rock titles - 1989's 'Suck on This,' 1990's 'Frizzle Fry,' 1991's 'Sailing the Seas of Cheese,' 1993's 'Pork Soda,' and 1995's 'Tales from the Punchbowl.' Along the way, Primus toured with some of rock's biggest names (Jane's Addiction, Public Enemy, Rush, U2, etc.), headlined the third-ever Lollapalooza Festival, and issued a variety of crafty music videos, which stood out in sharp contrast to the ultra-seriousness of most other video clips at the time. Alexander exited Primus in 1996, but returned in 2003, in time for an EP/DVD set, 'Animals Should Not Try to Act Like People,' and a sold out reunion tour, that lasted over the next few years, before the drummer departed once more. But as Claypool got to work on putting together a forthcoming book about the band's history, Les began longing for the days of when Alexander's unmistakable and powerful drumming provided the beat. A phone call was placed, a conversation ensued, and before you could say, "Here come the bastards," the Claypool-LaLonde-Alexander line-up was back in business. Plans to tour the world over and offering up new music are already in place. Be forewarned…here they come!

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Richard Julian

Aug 1

Aug 1

Doors open at 4:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $15-$80.50

Event Information

With the release of her nineteenth album, Slipstream, Bonnie Raitt is starting anew. The album marks her return to studio recording after seven years; it's coming out as the launch of her own label, Redwing Records; and it delivers some of the most surprising and rewarding music of her remarkable career, thanks in part to some experimental sessions with celebrated producer Joe Henry. The years before and after Raitt's last album, 2005's acclaimed Souls Alike, weren't an easy time for her, with the passing of parents, her brother, and a best friend. So after following that album with her usual long run of touring—winding up with the "dream come true" of the "BonTaj Roulet" revue with Taj Mahal in 2009 and a triumphant appearance at the all-star Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 25th anniversary concerts the same year— she decided to step back and recharge for a while. "I took a hiatus from touring and recording to get back in touch with the other part of my life," she says. "On the road, under stress, it's hard to stay in balance and move forward." Excited to have time at home and with her family and friends, she could go to the symphony, check out live jazz and Cuban shows, and so much else. She continued her ongoing political work, helping to organize NukeFree.org in 2007 and supporting her favorite non-profit organizations. "I didn't have to be the professional version of myself for a long time," she says. "It wasn't so much a vacation as a chance to take care of a lot of neglected areas of my life, a lot of processing after all that loss and activity." When she started thinking about making music again, Bonnie knew she needed to try something out of the ordinary. "I was really interested in working with different people, and someone I had always been drawn to was Joe Henry," she says. "I'm a big fan of his writing and albums and love the work he's done producing Allen Toussaint, Solomon Burke, and others. I thought it would be really intriguing to see what we could come up with. Coincidentally, he had been wanting to call me as well. Our first phone call lasted over two hours." They found a brief window when Henry's usual crew of musicians was available, augmented by a new friend of Bonnie's, the magnificent guitarist Bill Frisell. "I didn't have to produce or get the band together, I could just show up and sing," she says. "I came to Joe's with, to use a Zen expression, 'beginner's mind.'" The experiment yielded eight songs in 48 hours, and Raitt was inspired to get back to work full force. "I loved singing these songs and playing with these guys so much," she says, "This was just the jumpstart I needed to get me back in the saddle and wanting to work on a new album." She plans to release the full results of the Joe Henry sessions down the line, but for now she chose to include four of these tracks on Slipstream —the Henry originals "You Can't Fail Me Now" (co-written with Loudon Wainwright III) and "God Only Knows," and two songs from Bob Dylan's Time Out of Mind album, "Million Miles" and "Standing in the Doorway." A few months later, Raitt gathered her long-time touring bandmates—George Marinelli on guitar, James "Hutch" Hutchinson on bass, and Ricky Fataar on drums—along with a new addition and an old friend on keys, Mike Finnigan (Taj Mahal; Joe Cocker; Crosby, Stills and Nash) in a Los Angeles studio. Bonnie was also pleased to have Maia Sharp, one of her favorite artists and a collaborator on Souls Alike, joining her team once again, adding back-up vocals to several songs. Raitt retained Henry's engineer, Ryan Freeland (Ray LaMontagne, Ramblin' Jack Elliot, Aimee Mann), whom she loved working with, as a way to unify the project's sound. The band went straight to work and quickly recorded a slew of songs Raitt had been collecting over the last few years. Where Raitt's last several albums concentrated on material from lesser-known and younger songwriters, Slipstream draws from more of her contemporaries, including Paul Brady and Michael O'Keefe's "Marriage Made in Hollywood" and a reggae-fied version of Gerry Rafferty's "Right Down the Line." Her longtime friend Al Anderson, formerly of NRBQ, contributes three songs and plays on four; his hard-bopping guitar work adds to the general sense of six-string gunslinging throughout the album. "One of the new things about this record is that we let the guitar jams go on for a while," says Raitt. George and I got into some rockin' back and forth like we do live, and I had a ball going head-to-head with Al Anderson, one of my all-time favorite guitarists, on his 'Split Decision.' More than just a best-selling artist, respected guitarist, expressive singer, and accomplished songwriter, Bonnie Raitt has become an institution in American music. Born to a musical family, the nine-time Grammy winner, who Rolling Stone named one of the "100 Greatest Singers of All Time," is the daughter of celebrated Broadway singer John Raitt (Carousel, Oklahoma!, The Pajama Game) and accomplished pianist/singer Marge Goddard. She was raised in Los Angeles in a climate of respect for the arts, Quaker traditions, and a commitment to social activism. A Stella guitar given to her as a Christmas present launched Bonnie on her creative journey at the age of eight. While growing up, though passionate about music from the start, she never considered that it would play a greater role than as one of her many growing interests. In the late '60s, restless in Los Angeles, she moved east to Cambridge, Massachusetts. As a Harvard/Radcliffe student majoring in Social Relations and African Studies, she attended classes and immersed herself in the city's turbulent cultural and political activities. "I couldn't wait to get back to where there were folkies and the antiwar and civil rights movements," she says. "There were so many great music and political scenes going on in the late '60s in Cambridge." Also, she adds, with a laugh, "the ratio of guys to girls at Harvard was four to one, so all of those things were playing in my mind." Raitt was already deeply involved with folk music and the blues at that time. Exposure to the album Blues at Newport 1963 at age 14 had kindled her interest in blues and slide guitar, and between classes at Harvard she explored these and other styles in local coffeehouse gigs. Three years after entering college, Bonnie left to commit herself full-time to music, and shortly afterward found herself opening for surviving giants of the blues. From Mississippi Fred McDowell, Sippie Wallace, Son House, Muddy Waters, and John Lee Hooker she learned first-hand lessons of life as well as invaluable techniques of performance. "I'm certain that it was an incredible gift for me to not only be friends with some of the greatest blues people who've ever lived, but to learn how they played, how they sang, how they lived their lives, ran their marriages, and talked to their kids," she says. "I was especially lucky as so many of them are no longer with us." Word spread quickly of the young red-haired blueswoman, her soulful, unaffected way of singing, and her uncanny insights into blues guitar. Warner Bros. tracked her down, signed her up, and in 1971 released her debut album, Bonnie Raitt. Her interpretations of classic blues by Robert Johnson and Sippie Wallace made a powerful critical impression, but the presence of intriguing tunes by contemporary songwriters, as well as several examples of her own writing, indicated that this artist would not be restricted to any one pigeonhole or style. Over the next seven years she would record six albums. Give It Up, Takin' My Time, Streetlights, and Home Plate were followed in 1977 by Sweet Forgiveness, which featured her first hit single, a gritty Memphis/R&B arrangement of Del Shannon's "Runaway." Three Grammy nominations followed in the 1980s, as she released The Glow, Green Light, and Nine Lives. A compilation of highlights from these Warner Bros. albums (plus two previously unreleased live duets) was released as The Bonnie Raitt Collection in 1990. All of these Warners albums have been digitally remastered and re-released. In between sessions, when not burning highways on tour with her band, she devoted herself to playing benefits and speaking out in support of an array of worthy causes, campaigning to stop the war in Central America; participating in the Sun City anti-apartheid project; performing at the historic 1980 No Nukes concerts at Madison Square Garden; co-founding MUSE (Musicians United for Safe Energy); and working for environmental protection and for the rights of women and Native Americans. After forging an alliance with Capitol Records in 1989, Bonnie achieved new levels of popular and critical acclaim. She won four Grammy Awards in 1990—three for her Nick of Time album and one for her duet with John Lee Hooker on his breakthrough album, The Healer. Within weeks, Nick of Time shot to number one (it is now certified quintuple platinum). Luck of the Draw (1991, seven-times platinum) brought even more success, firing two hit singles— "Something to Talk About" and "I Can't Make You Love Me" —up the charts, and adding three more Grammys to her shelf. The double-platinum Longing in Their Hearts, released in 1994, featured the hit single "Love Sneakin' Up On You" and was honored with a Grammy for Best Pop Album. It was followed in 1995 by the live double CD and film Road Tested (now available on DVD). After all the awards and honors and decades of virtually non-stop touring under her belt, Bonnie continued her activism and guesting on numerous friends' records, including Ruth Brown, Charles Brown, Keb' Mo, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, and Bruce Cockburn, as well as tribute records for Richard Thompson, Lowell George, and Pete Seeger. She picked up another Grammy in 1996 for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for her collaboration on "SRV Shuffle" from the all-star Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan, and continued her "dual career," performing with her father, John, in concerts as well as on his Grammy-nominated album, Broadway Legend, released in 1995. In 1998, she returned to the studio with a new collaborative team to create Fundamental, one of her most exploratory projects, signaling her growing desire to "shake things up a bit." Inspired by the music of Zimbabwean world-beat master Oliver Mtukudzi, Bonnie wrote "One Belief Away," the first single, with Paul Brady and Dillon O'Brian. In March of 2000, Bonnie was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame; this was followed by her welcome into the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame, along with her father, in June 2001. Over the years, Bonnie has appeared as a guest on over 100 album projects, as chronicled in the discography section of her official website. She continues to stretch the boundaries, performing with artists as varied as Cape Verdean singer Cesaria Evora, and legends B.B.King, Tony Bennett, and Willie Nelson. After the Fundamental tour, she went back into the studio with her veteran road band to record Silver Lining, released in 2002. Featuring Bonnie'sstunning interpretation of the David Gray-penned title track, the Grammy-nominated "Gnawin' On It," and the hit single "I Can't Help You Now,"Silver Lining was considered by many critics to be one of the best albums of her career. She promoted the album with a lengthy world tour that included her Green Highway Festival and an eco-partnership promoting BioDiesel fuel, the environment, and alternative energy solutions at shows and benefits along the way. In 2003, she released the retrospective The Best of Bonnie Raitt on Capitol. Raitt stayed busy with more guest appearances, including the stunning duet "Do I Ever Cross Your Mind" on Ray Charles' final release, Genius Loves Company, which won the Grammy award for Album of the Year, and a duet on the Grammy-winning album True Love by Toots & The Maytals. Her 1989 breakthrough album, Nick of Time, was remixed for surround sound, and released by Capitol Records in 2004 as a DVD-Audio, garnering a Grammy nomination in the newly created category, Best Surround Sound Album. In 2003, she also participated in Martin Scorsese's acclaimed PBS series, The Blues, performing two songs in Wim Wenders' film, The Soul of a Man, and joining the all-star cast of Lightning in a Bottle, the live feature concert film on the Blues directed by Antoine Fuqua. She also contributed songs for two Disney movies, The Country Bears and Home on the Range. She played guitar on a track on Stevie Wonder's album, A Time To Love, and appeared in the TV/DVD tribute, Music l0l: Al Green. Souls Alike, her first album ever to bear the credit "Produced by Bonnie Raitt." debuted at #19 on the Billboard 200 in September 2005, eliciting widespread critical acclaim and propelling Raitt back onto the road. She was also selected as the inaugural artist for the VH1 Classic Decades Rock Live! CD/DVD series. Bonnie Raitt and Friends Featuring Norah Jones, Ben Harper, Alison Krauss and Keb'Mo' was released in August of 2006. In the years in and around the release of Souls Alike, she co-headlined with Jackson Browne and Keb Mo' part of the historic "Vote For Change" tour leading up to the 2004 Presidential election, and then again for the 2008 election, staged a series of benefit concerts and fundraising receptions to help get out the vote and encourage voting in key Democratic Senate races. In 2007, Bonnie joined her MUSE (Musicians United for Safe Energy) friends Jackson Browne and Graham Nash to launch a campaign to prevent the legislative bailout of the nuclear industry and developed www.nukefree.org, a website that serves as an information and networking hub for safe energy activists. In August 2011, MUSE mounted a very successful benefit concert at Shoreline Amphitheatre to raise funds for Japan disaster relief (following the devastating earthquake, tsunami and meltdown of the Daichi-Fukushima nuclear reactors earlier in the year,) as well as non-nuclear organizations worldwide. Bonnie continues to use her influence to affect the way music is perceived and appreciated in the world. In 1988, she co-founded the Rhythm and Blues Foundation, which works to improve royalties, financial conditions, and recognition for a whole generation of R&B pioneers to whom she feels we owe so much. In 1995, she initiated the Bonnie Raitt Guitar Project with the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, currently running in 200 clubs around the world, to encourage underprivileged youth to play music as budgets for music instruction in the schools run dry. Bonnie currently sits on the Advisory or Honorary Boards of a number of organizations, including Little Kids Rock, Rainforest Action Network, Music Maker Relief Foundation and the Arhoolie Foundation. Her commitment to the redemptive power of music is expressed in the foreword she wrote to American Roots, the book based on 2001's PBS series of the same name. "I feel strongly that this appreciation needs to be out there so that black, Latino and all kids can understand the roots of their own musical heritage," she explains. "The consolidation of the music business has made it difficult to encourage styles like the blues, all of which deserve to be celebrated as part of our most treasured national resources." In the summer of 2009, Bonnie Raitt and Taj Mahal—two leading lights of modern blues—joined forces for their first-ever tour together. The "BonTaj Roulet" tour featured Bonnie and Taj on stage alone and together, before closing each night with a collaborative, blow-out Rhythm and Blues revue-style performance. In addition to the glorious sounds made from the stage, the BonTaj Tour also raised over $200,000 for charity. In an act of democracy dubbed the BonTaj Collective Action Fund, concertgoers voted amongst four cause areas and net proceeds were distributed in proportion to overall votes tallied. "The 'BonTaj' tour was a dream of mine to put together," she says. "I knew that those shows—culminating in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame show, which was a blast—would signal the beginning of a hiatus for me." Now, Raitt is re-energized and excited to strap her guitar back on and get to work. After spending her career split between Warner Bros and Capitol Records, she is venturing out on her own with a label called Redwing Records. (Slipstream will be distributed by RED in North America and Proper Records for Ex North America.) The album's title is very significant for Bonnie —Slipstream isn't just a beautiful sounding word, but an indication of her place in the music community. "I'm in the slipstream of all these styles of music," she says. "I'm so inspired and so proud to continue these traditions, whether it's reggae or soul or blues. I'm in the slipstream of those who came before me, and I'm leaving one for those behind me. I'm holding up the traditions of the music that I love."

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

Aug 13

Aug 13

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

The Reflection is the first new studio album by Keb Mo since Suitcase in 2006. These twelve songs are the product of an important period of personal and professional growth for the artist formerly known as Kevin Moore. In that time, he started a new family; moved from Los Angeles to Nashville; built a state–of–the–art home studio, and founded his own label, Yolabelle International, distributed by Ryko and the Warner Music Group. Keb Mo is a three–time Grammy Award winner for Best Contemporary Blues Album; and a key figure in the acclaimed 2003 PBS series Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues. But The Reflection is not, in essence, a blues album. In sound and spirit, it’s closer to the work of African–American "folk soul" singer/songwriters like Bill Withers, Bobby Womack, and Terry Callier. Indeed, tracks like "My Shadow" and "Crush On You" would have fit neatly into Urban radio’s "Quiet Storm" format at almost any time in the past 25 years. The Reflection brings together all of this singular artist's diverse influences – pre–disco R&B, American folk and gospel, rock, blues, and more – in a sound that is truly and uniquely his own. "I worked on this record for the better part of two years," says Keb. "It took me some time as this was an educational process for me and my engineer John Schirmer. I didn’t want to let it go until I had something that I was proud to share with the public. It’s the culmination of all of my influences throughout my career." Through all the changes of the past several years, Keb Mo found time to play a couple of hundred shows on several continents. He composed and recorded music for the acclaimed TNT series "Memphis Beat," starring Jason Lee and Alfre Woodward. And he wrote some of the best songs of his career for The Reflection – material strong enough to attract such notable guests as country music superstar Vince Gill ("My Baby’s Tellin’ Lies"), nouveau–soul chanteuse India.Arie ("Crush On You"), saxophonist Dave Koz ("One Of These Nights"), and veteran session guitarist David T. Walker ("All The Way," "The Reflection," "The Whole Enchilada"). AWARDS GRAMMY AWARD Contemporary Blues Album "Keep It Simple" 2005 GRAMMY AWARD Contemporary Blues Album "Slow Down" 1999 GRAMMY AWARD Contemporary Blues Album "Just Like You" 1997 GRAMMY AWARD NOMINATION Blues Album of the Year "The Reflection" 2011 GRAMMY AWARD NOMINATION Contemporary Blues Album of the Year "Suitcase" 2007 GRAMMY AWARD NOMINATION Contemporary Blues Album of the Year "Big Wide Grin" 2002 GRAMMY AWARD NOMINATION Contemporary Blues Album of the Year "The Door" 2001 GRAMMY AWARD NOMINATION Country Song of the Year "I Hope" 2006 GOLD RECORD certified by RIAA for "Keb' Mo'" 2005 2002 ORVILLE GIBSON AWARDS- Best Blues Guitarist 2008 ELEVATE FILM FESTIVAL- Best Music Artist 2008 ELEVATE FILM FESTIVAL- Best Music Video HOLLYWOOD ROCK WALK INDUCTION - June 16, 2007 WC HANDY Blues Awards: 1999 Song of the Year - Soon As I Get Paid 1994 Country/Acoustic Blues Album of the Year - Keb' Mo' album 1999 & 2000 Contemporary Blues Male Artist of the Year 1997-2002 Acoustic Blues Artist of the Year

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with The Front Bottoms and Kevin Devine and the Goddamn Band

Aug 15

Aug 15

Doors open at 5:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $15-$42

Event Information

Although the members of Brand New cut their teeth in various hardcore bands, the group took a more melodic approach to its own work, embracing punk-pop on the debut album Your Favorite Weapon and incorporating aspects of indie rock during future projects. Formed in Long Island, NY, the band took shape in 2000 around the talents of drummer Brian Lane, vocalist/guitarist Jesse Lacey, bassist Garrett Tierney, and guitarist Vin Accardi. Brand New wasted little time attracting local attention with a self-released demo, and shows alongside Midtown and Glassjaw helped spread the band's buzz outside of New York. In 2001, the musicians issued their first record, Your Favorite Weapon, which featured production from friend Mike Sapone. Lacey's clever and cutting lyrics sprinkled the album, which produced the semi-hit "Jude Law and a Semester Abroad," and more touring with the likes of Taking Back Sunday and Finch followed.
Deja Entendu Proving to be more than just another punk-pop outfit, the group made something of a stylistic leap with Deja Entendu, a decidedly matured follow-up that was recorded with Steve Haigler (Pixies, Blake Babies) and released in summer 2003 to warm reviews. Music videos for "The Quiet Things That No One Ever Knows" and "Sic Transit Gloria...Glory Fades" found significant airplay on MTV, and Brand New graduated to larger venues by playing with New Found Glory, Good Charlotte, Dashboard Confessional, and blink-182. By that fall, as the band's underground following continued growing into a mainstream audience, Brand New inked a deal with Dreamworks, which later led to a partnership with Interscope following the former label's buyout.
The Devil and God Are Raging Inside Me Touring eventually slowed to a halt as Brand New holed themselves up to work on their third album and major-label debut. After an extended quiet spell -- little to no interviews or updates came from the band's camp for quite some time -- Brand New finally emerged in summer 2006 for several headlining dates in America, their first nationwide tour in three years. The highly anticipated The Devil and God Are Raging Inside Me appeared in November 2006. Though significantly darker and less immediate than past efforts, the album was commended for its depth and maturity, and the band supported it with a sold-out spring 2007 tour. Meanwhile, sales for Deja Entendu continued to trickle in, and the album went gold that May. Brand New set to work on another album one year later, once again working with producer Mike Sapone on the new material. The resulting record, Daisy, was issued in 2009, and the band took a different approach by focusing nearly all of its promotional abilities on European audiences instead of American fans. A Deluxe version of Your Favorite Weapon was released in 2011.

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Manchester Orchestra and also Kevin Devine and the Goddamn Band

Show SOLD OUT! Camping Upgrades are still available.

Aug 16

Aug 16

Doors open at 5:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $15-$37.50

Event Information

Although the members of Brand New cut their teeth in various hardcore bands, the group took a more melodic approach to its own work, embracing punk-pop on the debut album Your Favorite Weapon and incorporating aspects of indie rock during future projects. Formed in Long Island, NY, the band took shape in 2000 around the talents of drummer Brian Lane, vocalist/guitarist Jesse Lacey, bassist Garrett Tierney, and guitarist Vin Accardi. Brand New wasted little time attracting local attention with a self-released demo, and shows alongside Midtown and Glassjaw helped spread the band's buzz outside of New York. In 2001, the musicians issued their first record, Your Favorite Weapon, which featured production from friend Mike Sapone. Lacey's clever and cutting lyrics sprinkled the album, which produced the semi-hit "Jude Law and a Semester Abroad," and more touring with the likes of Taking Back Sunday and Finch followed. Deja Entendu Proving to be more than just another punk-pop outfit, the group made something of a stylistic leap with Deja Entendu, a decidedly matured follow-up that was recorded with Steve Haigler (Pixies, Blake Babies) and released in summer 2003 to warm reviews. Music videos for "The Quiet Things That No One Ever Knows" and "Sic Transit Gloria...Glory Fades" found significant airplay on MTV, and Brand New graduated to larger venues by playing with New Found Glory, Good Charlotte, Dashboard Confessional, and blink-182. By that fall, as the band's underground following continued growing into a mainstream audience, Brand New inked a deal with Dreamworks, which later led to a partnership with Interscope following the former label's buyout. The Devil and God Are Raging Inside Me Touring eventually slowed to a halt as Brand New holed themselves up to work on their third album and major-label debut. After an extended quiet spell -- little to no interviews or updates came from the band's camp for quite some time -- Brand New finally emerged in summer 2006 for several headlining dates in America, their first nationwide tour in three years. The highly anticipated The Devil and God Are Raging Inside Me appeared in November 2006. Though significantly darker and less immediate than past efforts, the album was commended for its depth and maturity, and the band supported it with a sold-out spring 2007 tour. Meanwhile, sales for Deja Entendu continued to trickle in, and the album went gold that May. Brand New set to work on another album one year later, once again working with producer Mike Sapone on the new material. The resulting record, Daisy, was issued in 2009, and the band took a different approach by focusing nearly all of its promotional abilities on European audiences instead of American fans. A Deluxe version of Your Favorite Weapon was released in 2011.

Academy of Music - Northampton, MA

Sep 7

Sep 7

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Grammy-nominated harmony duo The Milk Carton Kids have announced the May 19, 2015 release of their third album, Monterey. A refreshing alternative to the foot-stomping grandeur of the so-called “folk revival,” an understated virtuosity defines The Milk Carton Kids and their new album. The two years since the release of their last album, The Ash & Clay, have been significant ones for the group. In addition to a Grammy nomination for Best Folk Album, The Milk Carton Kids won Duo/Group of the Year at the Americana Music Awards in 2014. Their featured performances and interviews in T Bone Burnett & the Coen Brothers' concert documentary, "Another Day/Another Time,” brought the band its widest audience and their 55-city North American tour last year sold out months in advance. Cultural purveyors from Garrison Keillor to T Bone Burnett to Billy Bragg have hailed the duo’s importance among a group of new folk bands, both expanding and contradicting the rich tradition that precedes them. Yet while some of the band’s many accolades reference a specific genre, the duo quickly transcends those tags with clear inflections of jazz, classical, even the dark lyricism of modern “alternative." This past year, The Milk Carton Kids were asked to pay tribute to Johnny Cash and Emmylou Harris — Cash on the Joe Henry-produced remake of “Bitter Tears,” and Harris with their standing ovation performance at the tribute concert “The Life & Songs of Emmylou Harris,” among luminaries including Kris Kristofferson, Mavis Staples, Alison Kraus, Iron & Wine, and Harris herself. If Cash and Harris taught us that American music is meant to be taken at its expansive word, without confines or borders, The Milk Carton Kids appear to have taken the lesson to heart.

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

Sep 11

Sep 11

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $20-$25

Event Information

This is a general admission seated event


Formed in Sleepy Hollow, New York over a decade ago, The Slambovian Circus of Dreams (AKA The Grand Slambovians) pioneered the alt-folk/americana genre, staying on the fringes of the music industry and under the radar while producing several critically acclaimed studio albums. 'A Box of Everything' the band's next release (due out April 1st, 2014) is a compilation of the 'Greatest Hits' you've never heard from this reclusive band. Their melodic avant-folk conjures a quirkier Tom Petty or fuller Buffalo Tom with an exotic instrumental arsenal. If you like Dylan, Bowie, The Decemberists, you'll find a lot to love about this band which features an otherworldly slide mandolin, accordion, cello and styles ranging from dusty Americana ballads to Pink Floydesque cinematic anthems. Headlining major music festivals and venues across the US, Canada and UK, they built their career from the ground up with a loyal fan base supporting them all the way. Fronted by songwriter Joziah Longo (vocals/guitar/harmonica) whose voice is "Soothing and bewitching as a snake oil tonic" says The Big Issue, UK and goes on to say "the entire root system of Rock Family Trees is embedded in his voice". The band features guitarist/mandolin player Sharkey McEwen (think lovechild of David Gilmour and Duane Allman); multi-instrumentalist Tink Lloyd (accordion, cello, uke, theremin, melodica); and Eric Puente (Percussion).

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

Sep 24

Sep 24

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

From their days playing together as teenagers to their current acoustic and electric blues, probably no one has more consistently led American music for the last 50 years — yes! — than Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady, the founders and continuing core members of Hot Tuna.
The pair began playing together while growing up in the Washington D.C. area, where Jack’s father was a dentist and Jorma’s father a State Department official. Four years younger, Jack continued in junior high, then high school — while playing professional gigs as lead guitarist at night before he was old enough to drive — while Jorma (who had played rhythm guitar to Jack’s lead) started college in Ohio, accompanied his family overseas, then returned to college, this time in California.
Along the way, Jorma became enamored of, then committed to, the finger-picking guitar style exemplified by the now-legendary Rev. Gary Davis. Jack, meanwhile, had taken an interest in the electric bass, at the time a controversial instrument in blues, jazz, and folk circles.
In the mid 1960s, Jorma was asked to audition to play guitar for a new band that was forming in San Francisco. Though an acoustic player at heart, he grew interested in the electronic gadgetry that was beginning to make an appearance in the popular music scene — particularly in a primitive processor brought to the audition by a fellow named Ken Kesey — and decided to join that band; soon thereafter he summoned his young friend from Washington, who now played the bass.
Thus was created the unique (then and now) sound that was The Jefferson Airplane. Jorma even contributed the band’s name, drawn from a nickname a friend had for the blues-playing Jorma. Jack’s experience as a lead guitarist led to a style of bass playing which took the instrument far beyond its traditional role.
While in The Jefferson Airplane, putting together the soundtrack of the 60s, the pair remained loyal to the blues, jazz, bluegrass, and folk influences of the small clubs and larger venues they had learned from years before. While in San Francisco and even in hotel rooms on the road, they would play together and worked up a set of songs that they would often play at clubs in the Bay Area and while on the road, often after having played a set with the Airplane. This led to a record contract; in fact, they had an album recorded before they decided to name their band Hot Tuna. With it they launched on an odyssey which has itself continued for more than 35 years, always finding new and interesting turns in its path forward.
The first thing an early Hot Tuna fans discovered at their concerts of the early 1970s was that the band was growing louder and louder. In an era in which volume often overtrumped musicianship, Hot Tuna provided both. The second thing a fan would discover was that Jack and Jorma really loved to play. “Look around for another band that plays uninterrupted three- to six-hour sets,” wrote reviewer Jerry Moore. What Moore could not have known was that had there been no audience at all, they would have played just as long and just as well, so devoted were they to making music. Of course, the audience wasn’t superfluous by any means; it energized and continues to energize their performances. Album followed album — more than two dozen in all, not counting solo efforts, side projects, and appearances on the albums of other bands and performers — and they continued to develop their interests and styles, both together and in individual pursuits. In an era in which old bands reunite for one last tour, Hot Tuna can’t because Hot Tuna never broke up.
Along the way, they have been joined by a succession of talented musicians: Drummers, harmonica players, keyboardists, backup singers, violinists, mandolinists, and more, all fitting in to Jorma and Jack’s current place in the musical spectrum. And along the way there was no list of outstanding guitarists that didn’t include Jorma, nor was there anyone who seriously thought there is a better bass player than Jack.
After two decades of acoustic and electric concerts and albums, the 1990s brought a new focus on acoustic music to Hot Tuna. More intimate venues with a more individual connection to the audience became increasingly frequent stops. Soon, the loud electric sound (and the semi trailer load of equipment) disappeared entirely from Hot Tuna tours. Maturity brought the desire to do things not instead of but in addition to being a touring band. Both had become interested in teaching, passing along what they had learned and what they had uniquely developed to a new generation of players.
In 1998 Jorma and his wife Vanessa opened Fur Peace Ranch Guitar Camp, in the beautiful rolling Appalachian foothills of southeastern Ohio.
Here, on a sprawling and rustic yet modern campus, musicians and would-be musicians come for intensive and enjoyable workshops taught by Jorma, Jack, and other extraordinary players, learning things that range from different styles of playing to songwriting and even storytelling (the musician in performance has to say something while changing that broken string!), to making a song one’s own.
In addition, there is now BreakDownWay.com, a unique interactive teaching site that comes closest of anything yet to make individual instruction available to students anywhere there is a computer and an Internet connection.
But the teaching doesn’t replace Hot Tuna’s busy tour schedule; it’s in addition to the tours. Nor have they lighened up their individual schedules. Jack released his first solo CD, Dream Factor, on Eagle Records in 2003. He has a busy and elaborate website at jackcasady.com. Jorma has a website, too, and achieved enormous critical acclaim and a Grammy nomination for his 2003 solo album, Blue Country Heart. (Both are in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame due to their pioneering work in The Jefferson Airplane.) As 2006 began, they launched another exciting website, Hot Tuna Tunes, where fans may inexpensively download professionally made recordings of full Hot Tuna concerts in both MP3 and lossless encodings, suitable for portable player and home-burned CDs respectively. Hot Tuna Tunes is added to all the time, so it’s almost as if Hot Tuna were releasing numerous live concert albums every year. Collect the entire set!
For the last few years, Jorma and Jack have been joined in most of their Hot Tuna performances by the mandolin virtuoso Barry Mitterhoff. A veteran of bluegrass, Celtic, folk, and rock-influenced bands including “Tony Trischka and Skyline” and “Bottle Hill,” Barry has found a new voice in working with Hot Tuna, and the fit has been good — watching them play, it’s as if he’s been there from the beginning and they’re all having the time of their lives.
Jorma and Jack certainly could not have imagined, let alone predicted, where playing would take them. It’s been a long and fascinating road to numerous exciting destinations. Two things have never changed: They still love to play as much as they did as kids in Washington D.C., and there are still many, many exciting miles yet to travel on their musical odyssey.

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

General Admission Seated Event

Sep 26

Sep 26

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $25-$30

Event Information

PLEASE NOTE THIS IS A GENERAL ADMISSION SEATED EVENT


Honing a synthesis of folk and blues for 50 years, Chris Smither is truly an American original. His new CD, Still On the Levee, is a career-spanning retrospective double CD. Recorded in New Orleans with studio-mates, The Motivators, Still On the Levee plays host to special guests including Allen Toussaint and Loudon Wainwright III. The record highlights the vast catalog of an American music master. Reviewers and fans from around the world agree that Chris is a profound songwriter, a blistering guitarist and, as he puts it, a 'one-man band to the bone!’ Chris melds the guitar styles of his two major influences, Lightnin' Hopkins and Mississippi John Hurt, into his own signature sound. His music continues to draw deeply from the blues, American folk music, modern poets and humanist philosophers. 'Link Of Chain', a tribute album of Chris Smither originals with stellar versions by Dave Alvin, Tim O'Brien, Bonnie Raitt, Josh Ritter, Loudon Wainwright III, Jorma Kaukonen, Eilen Jewell and others is now available from Signature Sounds.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Sep 26

Sep 26

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

When country a cappella band Home Free was crowned Season 4 Champions of NBC's The Sing-Off this past December, their victory was by no means the beginnings of a career for the five country stars from Minnesota… rather it was a satisfying culmination of nearly a decade of hard work and commitment to a vocal craft growing in popularity. Founded by brothers Chris and Adam Rupp during their college years in the early 2000s, Home Free had been perfecting their live show for years prior to The Sing-Off--performing together for crowds in countless State and County Fairs, on college campuses, in Fortune 500 companies, and in theaters all across the country. It was their experience on the road that carried them to a Sing-Off victory, swelling their fan base and bringing their homegrown country style into a national spotlight. Home Free continues to entertain audiences with their high-energy show peppered with quick-witted humor that meshes Nashville standards with pop hits dipped in country flavor. This spring they continue their journey as they take part in the 32-city, 36-show Sing-Off Tour Live! on the heels of their Columbia Records debut release, Crazy Life, in stores now.

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

Oct 2

Oct 2

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

“At the top of her game…” (San Francisco Chronicle)


“Never been funnier…” (Boston Globe)


"Insightful, thought-provoking humor… (Chicago Tribune)


32 years ago Paula Poundstone climbed on a Greyhound bus and traveled across the country -- stopping in at open mic nights at comedy clubs as she went. A high school drop-out, she went on to become one of the great humorists of our time. You can hear her through your laughter as a regular panelist on NPR’s popular rascal of a weekly news quiz show, Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me. She tours regularly, performing standup comedy across the country, causing Bob Zany with the Boston Globe to write: “Poundstone can regale an audience for several hours with her distinctive brand of wry, intelligent and witty comedy.” Audience members may put it a little less elegantly: “I peed my pants.” While there is no doubt that Poundstone is funny, the thing that separates her from the pack of comics working today and that has made her a legend among comics and audiences alike is her ability to be spontaneous with a crowd. Poundstone says: “No two shows I do are the same. It's not that I don't repeat material. I do. My shows, when they're good, and I like to think they often are, are like a cocktail party. When you first get there, you talk about how badly you got lost and how hard it was to find parking. Then you tell a story about your kids or what you just saw on the news. You meet some new people and ask them about themselves. Then, someone says, "Tell that story you used to tell," and then someone on the other side of the room spills a drink, and you mock them. No one ever applauds me when I leave a party, though. I think they high five.” Paula's interchanges with the audience are never mean or done at a person’s expense. She even manages to handle politics without provoking the pall of disapproval less artful comics have received. Paula’s touring schedule is rigorous. She performs an average of 75 dates per year, mostly in Performing Arts Centers and Theatres. For those who don’t have a chance to see her live, they can listen to her brilliance on her CD’s or read her in print: Her newest comedy CD, I HEART JOKES: Paula Tells Them in Boston was recorded during a performance at the historic Wilbur Theatre in the heart of the city and released on April Fool’s Day 2013. It follows her first CD, I HEART JOKES: Paula Tells Them in Maine (November 2007), recorded at the world-famous Stone Mt. Arts Center in none-other than, Maine! Both are available for sale thru Paula’s website at www.paulapoundstone.com, on Amazon, CDbaby, Itunes, and if you are there, at Paula’s shows! Paula is also an accomplished writer. Her first hard cover book, There is Nothing In This Book That I Meant To Say, with a forward by Mary Tyler Moore, was published in 2006 by Harmony Books, a division of Random House. It is still in release on audio (Highbridge) and in paperback. Paula is hard at work on her second book, this one for Algonquin Press. Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me is now the most popular show on NPR, having reached #1 status in 2014. Listeners can test their knowledge against some of the best and brightest in the news and entertainment world while figuring out what's real news and what's made up. Paula quickly goes on record about how much she loves being part of the show saying: “I am a proud member of the endorphin production industry. They allow me to say whatever I want on Wait, Wait…Don't Tell Me. The panelists are unscripted, so it's perfect for me. I feel like I'm a batter in a batting cage. I get lobbed topics. Sometimes I just watch them go by, but every now and then I get a piece of one. If the others didn't cheat, it would be an almost perfect work experience.” The show is also heard internationally on NPR Worldwide and on the Internet via podcast. In May 2013 the show was Cinecast to movie theatres across the country.Paula was on the show, as was Steve Martin. Paula recently did commentary on CBS Sunday Morning. Her editorial pieces can be heard on NPR's All Things Considered. An avid reader, Paula signed on as the National Spokesperson for the American Library Association’s (ALA) United for Libraries in 2008 – a role she continues to this day! United for Libraries is a national citizen’s support group that works to raise funds and awareness for their local libraries. Said Paula, when she was chosen, “It’s funny that we think of libraries as quiet demure places where we are shushed by dusty, bun-balancing, bespectacled women. The truth is libraries are raucous clubhouses for free speech, controversy and community. Librarians have stood up to the Patriot Act, sat down with noisy toddlers and reached out to illiterate adults. Libraries can never be shushed.” As part of her duties, Paula recorded a public service announcement for United for Libraries and helps raise funds. For the last four years she has also been the headline panelist at the ALA’s annual conference for their “Laughs On Us” panel of writers. To quote Sally Reed, the ALA Nat'l Director: "...you'd have to come to one of these events to see how adored Paula is by librarians. We love her and it's never repetitive." Paula's incredible spontaneous humor is the perfect fit for the voracious appetite of the social networks: Follow her on: Twitter@twitter.com/paulapoundstone; Facebook: facebook.com/PaulaPoundstone. And enjoy her website: www.paulapoundstone.com Paula grew up in Sudbury, Massachusetts, and began performing at open-mic nights in 1979. Over the span of her career, she has amassed a list of awards and accolades that stretch the length of a great big tall guy’s arm. She not only shot through the glass ceiling, she never acknowledged it was there. She was never one to stereotype herself as a ‘female comedian’ or limit herself to comedy from a ‘female’ point of view. In the early 90’s she was the first woman to win the cable ACE for Best Standup Comedy Special and the first woman to be invited to perform standup at the prestigious White House Correspondents dinner where she joined the current President as part of the evening’s entertainment. Paula starred in a self-titled series for HBO in ’93 (for which she won her second Cable ACE Award for Best Program Interviewer) and moved the show to ABC which was short-lived, but applauded for its break from convention. Paula had her own comedy specials on HBO and BRAVO. In fact, she starred in several comedy specials on HBO, including “Paula Poundstone Goes to Harvard,” the only time the elite university has allowed their name to be used in the title of a television show. If it means anything to anyone, Paula is recognized as one of Comedy Central's 100 greatest stand-ups of all time. She won an American Comedy Award for Best Female Standup Comic, and in 2010 she was one of a select group voted into the Comedy Hall of Fame. Late-night America roared when Paula served as "official correspondent" for The Tonight Show during the 1992 Presidential race. This was followed by her extremely successful backstage commentary during the 1993 Emmy telecast. She has made numerous appearances on all the late night talk shows, including David Letterman, and a regular stint with Craig Ferguson. She has also appeared on The Today Show, Good Morning America, and guested several times on Garrison Keillor’s A Prairie Home Companion. In 2000, when a syndicated version of the popular game show To Tell The Truth came calling for Paula to be one of the panelists, she found another perfect showcase for her razor-sharp humor and spontaneous wit. Beginning in 1997, Paula voiced the character of Judge Stone on the acclaimed ABC-TV Saturday morning animated series Science Court (a.k.a. “Squigglevision”) for three years. In 1999 (the premiereseason) she added to her repertoire the voice of the Mom, ‘Paula’ in what is still considered a renownedcult show, Home Movies (UPN and The Cartoon Network). Paula guest starred on the CBS series Cybill, which led to a recurring role during the show’s final season, and also appeared on PBS favorites such as Sesame Street and Storytime. She won a local Emmy Award for her field pieces on the erudite “Life & Times” for PBS station KCET. She appeared on several network television specials including A Salute to The President from Fords Theatre on ABC when President Clinton was in office, and performed on every Comic Relief Special on HBO. These specials were heralded for the hundreds of thousands of dollars raised for the homeless and the lineup of stars. Paula has also enjoyed success as a Host of many events, including the Art Directors Guild Awards, an unprecedented 4 times, Logically Paula is almost always included in any compendium – be it film, television or print, noting comedic influences of the 20th/21st century. They include Why We Laugh Too: Women of Comedy (Lions Gate feature-length documentary, Showtime, 2013); We Killed: The Rise of Women in American Comedy (Sarah Crichton Books, 2012.) One of Paula’s quotes is even included in a new beautifully illustrated coffee table book on cats alongside quotes by notable authors and artists including W. H. Auden, Mark Twain, and Henry David Thoreau (Chronicle Books, 2015). Paula’s other writing credits include the back page column for Mother Jones from 1995-1998, the “Sunday Calendar” section for the Los Angeles Times, Entertainment Weekly, and Glamour magazine. In 2006 Paula authored a series of three math books with her high school Math teacher, Faye Ruopp: The Sticky Problem of Parallelogram Pancakes: And Other Skill-Building Math Activities, Grades 4-5; Venn Can We Be Friends?: And Other Skill-Building Math Activities, Grades 6-7; You Can't Keep Slope Down: And Other Skill-Building Math Activities, Grades 8-9. These are all available thru Amazon. Paula has three children, Toshia, Allison, and Thomas E. Poundstone. The family lives in Santa Monica, California.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Oct 3

Oct 3

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

“At the top of her game…” (San Francisco Chronicle)


“Never been funnier…” (Boston Globe)


"Insightful, thought-provoking humor… (Chicago Tribune)


32 years ago Paula Poundstone climbed on a Greyhound bus and traveled across the country -- stopping in at open mic nights at comedy clubs as she went. A high school drop-out, she went on to become one of the great humorists of our time. You can hear her through your laughter as a regular panelist on NPR’s popular rascal of a weekly news quiz show, Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me. She tours regularly, performing standup comedy across the country, causing Bob Zany with the Boston Globe to write: “Poundstone can regale an audience for several hours with her distinctive brand of wry, intelligent and witty comedy.” Audience members may put it a little less elegantly: “I peed my pants.” While there is no doubt that Poundstone is funny, the thing that separates her from the pack of comics working today and that has made her a legend among comics and audiences alike is her ability to be spontaneous with a crowd. Poundstone says: “No two shows I do are the same. It's not that I don't repeat material. I do. My shows, when they're good, and I like to think they often are, are like a cocktail party. When you first get there, you talk about how badly you got lost and how hard it was to find parking. Then you tell a story about your kids or what you just saw on the news. You meet some new people and ask them about themselves. Then, someone says, "Tell that story you used to tell," and then someone on the other side of the room spills a drink, and you mock them. No one ever applauds me when I leave a party, though. I think they high five.” Paula's interchanges with the audience are never mean or done at a person’s expense. She even manages to handle politics without provoking the pall of disapproval less artful comics have received. Paula’s touring schedule is rigorous. She performs an average of 75 dates per year, mostly in Performing Arts Centers and Theatres. For those who don’t have a chance to see her live, they can listen to her brilliance on her CD’s or read her in print: Her newest comedy CD, I HEART JOKES: Paula Tells Them in Boston was recorded during a performance at the historic Wilbur Theatre in the heart of the city and released on April Fool’s Day 2013. It follows her first CD, I HEART JOKES: Paula Tells Them in Maine (November 2007), recorded at the world-famous Stone Mt. Arts Center in none-other than, Maine! Both are available for sale thru Paula’s website at www.paulapoundstone.com, on Amazon, CDbaby, Itunes, and if you are there, at Paula’s shows! Paula is also an accomplished writer. Her first hard cover book, There is Nothing In This Book That I Meant To Say, with a forward by Mary Tyler Moore, was published in 2006 by Harmony Books, a division of Random House. It is still in release on audio (Highbridge) and in paperback. Paula is hard at work on her second book, this one for Algonquin Press. Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me is now the most popular show on NPR, having reached #1 status in 2014. Listeners can test their knowledge against some of the best and brightest in the news and entertainment world while figuring out what's real news and what's made up. Paula quickly goes on record about how much she loves being part of the show saying: “I am a proud member of the endorphin production industry. They allow me to say whatever I want on Wait, Wait…Don't Tell Me. The panelists are unscripted, so it's perfect for me. I feel like I'm a batter in a batting cage. I get lobbed topics. Sometimes I just watch them go by, but every now and then I get a piece of one. If the others didn't cheat, it would be an almost perfect work experience.” The show is also heard internationally on NPR Worldwide and on the Internet via podcast. In May 2013 the show was Cinecast to movie theatres across the country.Paula was on the show, as was Steve Martin. Paula recently did commentary on CBS Sunday Morning. Her editorial pieces can be heard on NPR's All Things Considered. An avid reader, Paula signed on as the National Spokesperson for the American Library Association’s (ALA) United for Libraries in 2008 – a role she continues to this day! United for Libraries is a national citizen’s support group that works to raise funds and awareness for their local libraries. Said Paula, when she was chosen, “It’s funny that we think of libraries as quiet demure places where we are shushed by dusty, bun-balancing, bespectacled women. The truth is libraries are raucous clubhouses for free speech, controversy and community. Librarians have stood up to the Patriot Act, sat down with noisy toddlers and reached out to illiterate adults. Libraries can never be shushed.” As part of her duties, Paula recorded a public service announcement for United for Libraries and helps raise funds. For the last four years she has also been the headline panelist at the ALA’s annual conference for their “Laughs On Us” panel of writers. To quote Sally Reed, the ALA Nat'l Director: "...you'd have to come to one of these events to see how adored Paula is by librarians. We love her and it's never repetitive." Paula's incredible spontaneous humor is the perfect fit for the voracious appetite of the social networks: Follow her on: Twitter@twitter.com/paulapoundstone; Facebook: facebook.com/PaulaPoundstone. And enjoy her website: www.paulapoundstone.com Paula grew up in Sudbury, Massachusetts, and began performing at open-mic nights in 1979. Over the span of her career, she has amassed a list of awards and accolades that stretch the length of a great big tall guy’s arm. She not only shot through the glass ceiling, she never acknowledged it was there. She was never one to stereotype herself as a ‘female comedian’ or limit herself to comedy from a ‘female’ point of view. In the early 90’s she was the first woman to win the cable ACE for Best Standup Comedy Special and the first woman to be invited to perform standup at the prestigious White House Correspondents dinner where she joined the current President as part of the evening’s entertainment. Paula starred in a self-titled series for HBO in ’93 (for which she won her second Cable ACE Award for Best Program Interviewer) and moved the show to ABC which was short-lived, but applauded for its break from convention. Paula had her own comedy specials on HBO and BRAVO. In fact, she starred in several comedy specials on HBO, including “Paula Poundstone Goes to Harvard,” the only time the elite university has allowed their name to be used in the title of a television show. If it means anything to anyone, Paula is recognized as one of Comedy Central's 100 greatest stand-ups of all time. She won an American Comedy Award for Best Female Standup Comic, and in 2010 she was one of a select group voted into the Comedy Hall of Fame. Late-night America roared when Paula served as "official correspondent" for The Tonight Show during the 1992 Presidential race. This was followed by her extremely successful backstage commentary during the 1993 Emmy telecast. She has made numerous appearances on all the late night talk shows, including David Letterman, and a regular stint with Craig Ferguson. She has also appeared on The Today Show, Good Morning America, and guested several times on Garrison Keillor’s A Prairie Home Companion. In 2000, when a syndicated version of the popular game show To Tell The Truth came calling for Paula to be one of the panelists, she found another perfect showcase for her razor-sharp humor and spontaneous wit. Beginning in 1997, Paula voiced the character of Judge Stone on the acclaimed ABC-TV Saturday morning animated series Science Court (a.k.a. “Squigglevision”) for three years. In 1999 (the premiereseason) she added to her repertoire the voice of the Mom, ‘Paula’ in what is still considered a renownedcult show, Home Movies (UPN and The Cartoon Network). Paula guest starred on the CBS series Cybill, which led to a recurring role during the show’s final season, and also appeared on PBS favorites such as Sesame Street and Storytime. She won a local Emmy Award for her field pieces on the erudite “Life & Times” for PBS station KCET. She appeared on several network television specials including A Salute to The President from Fords Theatre on ABC when President Clinton was in office, and performed on every Comic Relief Special on HBO. These specials were heralded for the hundreds of thousands of dollars raised for the homeless and the lineup of stars. Paula has also enjoyed success as a Host of many events, including the Art Directors Guild Awards, an unprecedented 4 times, Logically Paula is almost always included in any compendium – be it film, television or print, noting comedic influences of the 20th/21st century. They include Why We Laugh Too: Women of Comedy (Lions Gate feature-length documentary, Showtime, 2013); We Killed: The Rise of Women in American Comedy (Sarah Crichton Books, 2012.) One of Paula’s quotes is even included in a new beautifully illustrated coffee table book on cats alongside quotes by notable authors and artists including W. H. Auden, Mark Twain, and Henry David Thoreau (Chronicle Books, 2015). Paula’s other writing credits include the back page column for Mother Jones from 1995-1998, the “Sunday Calendar” section for the Los Angeles Times, Entertainment Weekly, and Glamour magazine. In 2006 Paula authored a series of three math books with her high school Math teacher, Faye Ruopp: The Sticky Problem of Parallelogram Pancakes: And Other Skill-Building Math Activities, Grades 4-5; Venn Can We Be Friends?: And Other Skill-Building Math Activities, Grades 6-7; You Can't Keep Slope Down: And Other Skill-Building Math Activities, Grades 8-9. These are all available thru Amazon. Paula has three children, Toshia, Allison, and Thomas E. Poundstone. The family lives in Santa Monica, California.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Oct 4

Oct 4

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $15

Event Information

The music of The Growlers is unmistakable. Sure, you can hone in on some influences baked into the work of this California-bred band. Heck, even they’d cop to a few, like Ricky Nelson and The Clash. But once those same RIYL tags have been filtered through the minds and hands and voices of this five-piece, there’s simply nothing else like it. The Growlers took the phrase “Beach Goth” as an apt descriptor of their music. Sunburned and salty, that term perfectly describes their distinctive melding of reverb heavy surf guitar and Bakersfield-style honky tonk with ‘80s post-punk. This is especially true of Chinese Fountain, The Growlers’ fifth full-length set to be released on September 23rd via Everloving Records. The 11 songs found on it are some of the strongest that they’ve committed to tape yet; a byproduct not only of eight years in the trenches together, but finely honing their gypsy folk dirges and psychedelic sea shanties to fans at close to 150 shows each year. The connection between vocalist Brooks Nielsen and guitarist Matt Taylor (the principal songwriters of the group) has only grown deeper. “The band played better than they’ve ever played,” says Nielsen. “We’ve got the process down now. There’s less screwing around to get the songs laid out and we weren’t waiting around for take after take. We knew it and we played without much time to spare.” That confidence bleeds through every track on Chinese Fountain, with the band assured enough to layer in shades of many new influences: the loping ska beat of “Dull Boy” and “Going Gets Tuff,” the playful disco beat behind the title track, or the Teardrop Explodes-like agitation of “Good Advice.” Not that the band left themselves much room to second-guess anything. The five spent about three weeks writing the tracks, and about half that time in the studio recording them. That may sound rushed, but it’s not as if you can hear any strain on the finished product; Chinese Fountain is as rock solid and watertight as anything in their still-growing discography. There’s evolution to be heard in Chinese Fountain as well, courtesy of some of Nielsen’s most pointed and poignant lyrics to date. He takes our obsession with the online world to task on the funky title track. When he drops the bomb that obliterates that most famous of Beatles’ claims with "The internet is bigger than Jesus or John Lennon” he re-contextualizes Marshall McLuhan's "the medium is the message" in the same breath. He urges positivity no matter the obstacles (“Going Gets Tuff”). Too, he reveals a tattered heart to the world on tracks like “Rare Hearts” and “Love Test.” “This is my chance to let it all out,” Nielsen says of these songs. “I kind of bottle things up and don’t really get emotional. But I think if I don’t open up, I’d be a really stale person.”

Berklee Performance Center - Boston, MA

Oct 9

Oct 9

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

Arlo Guthrie was born with a guitar in one hand and a harmonica in the other, in Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York in 1947. He is the eldest son of America's most beloved singer/writer/philosopher Woody Guthrie and Marjorie Mazia Guthrie, a professional dancer with the Martha Graham Company and founder of The Committee to Combat Huntington's Disease.

For more than a decade, Arlo has toured worldwide with different shows: An America Scrapbook, beginning 1998 (with symphony orchestras), The Guthrie Family Legacy Tour, beginning 2006 (with various family members), Boys Night Out Tour, beginning 2008 (with his son, Abe Guthrie and Grandson, Krishna), The Lost World Tour, beginning 2008 (with a big band and The Burns Sisters), The Guthrie Family Rides Again Tour beginning in 2009 (with the entire family), The Journey On Tour beginning 2010 (Big band & The Burns sisters), The Guthrie Family Reunion Tour beginning 2012 (The whole family), Here Comes The Kid - The Woody Guthrie Centennial Tour beginning 2012), Here Come The Kid(s) beginning in 2013 (continuing the Woody Centennial). The Centennial celebration tour ends May 2014.

Interspersed between all the tours was the recurring "Arlo Guthrie Solo Reunion Tour - Together At Last," which was certainly the best named tour. The currant version of the solo tour runs from June 2014 - November 2014. After the solo tour Arlo will put "Alice's Restaurant" back on the setlist menu for "The Alice's Restaurant 50th Anniversary Tour", with will run from January 2015 through May 2016. If he survives the "Alice 50 Tour" he will go fishing.

He grew up surrounded by dancers and musicians: Pete Seeger, Ronnie Gilbert, Fred Hellerman and Lee Hays (The Weavers), Leadbelly, Cisco Houston, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, all of whom were significant influences on Arlo's musical career. Guthrie gave his first public performance in 1961 at age 13 and quickly became involved in the music that was shaping the world. Over the next few years, Arlo inherited his father's friend Pete Seeger and the two toured together, between demonstrations, beginning in the late 60's. They continued doing over a dozen shows together almost every year for the next 40 years creating a legendary collaboration that continues to this day. The last Pete & Arlo show was in November 2012 at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

Arlo practically lived in the most famous venues of the "Folk Boom" era. In New York City he hung out at Gerdes Folk City, The Gaslight and The Bitter End. In Boston's Club 47, and in Philadelphia he made places like The 2nd Fret and The Main Point his home. He witnessed the transition from an earlier generation of ballad singers like Richard Dyer-Bennet and blues-men like Mississippi John Hurt, to a new era of singer-song writers such as Bob Dylan, Jim Croce, Joan Baez, and Phil Ochs. He grooved with the beat poets like Allen Ginsburg and Lord Buckley, and picked with players like Bill Monroe and Doc Watson. He learned something from everyone and developed his own style, becoming a distinctive, expressive voice in a crowded community of singer-songwriters and political-social commentators.

Arlo Guthrie's career exploded in 1967 with the release of "Alice's Restaurant", whose title song premiered at the Newport Folk Festival helped foster a new commitment among the '60s generation to social consciousness and activism. Arlo went on to star in the 1969 Hollywood film version of "Alice's Restaurant", directed by Arthur Penn. With songs like "Alice's Restaurant", too long for radio airplay; "Coming into Los Angeles", banned from many radio stations (but a favorite at the 1969 Woodstock Festival); and the definitive rendition of Steve Goodman's "City of New Orleans", Guthrie was no One-Hit-Wonder. An artist of international stature, he has never had a 'hit' in the usual sense. He has usually preferred to walk to his own beat rather than march in step to the drum of popular culture. Over the last five decades Guthrie has toured throughout North America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia winning a wide, popular following. In addition to his accomplishments as a musician, playing the piano, six and twelve-string guitar, harmonica and a dozen other instruments, Arlo is a natural-born storyteller, whose tales and anecdotes figure prominently in his performances.

In 1991 Arlo purchased the old Trinity Church. It was Thanksgiving 1965 that events took place at the church which inspired Arlo to write the song "Alice's Restaurant". Named for his parents, The Guthrie Center is a not-for-profit interfaith church foundation dedicated to providing a wide range of local and international services. Its outreach programs include everything from providing HIV/AIDS services to baking cookies with a local service organization; an HD walk-a-thon to raise awareness and money for a cure for Huntington's Disease, and offering a place simply to meditate. The Guthrie Foundation is a separate not-for-profit educational organization that addresses issues such as the environment, health care, cultural preservation and educational exchange. Arlo Guthrie, Rising Son Records and The Guthrie Center & Foundation are on the World Wide Web at http://www.risingsonrecords.com/

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Oct 10

Oct 10

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

THE MACHINE, America’s top Pink Floyd show, has forged a 25 year reputation of excellence, extending the legacy of Pink Floyd, while creating another legacy all their own. Over the years, The Machine has touched the hearts and souls of many, selling out theaters, large clubs and casinos across North and Central America, Europe and Asia. They have also appeared at renowned music festivals such as Bonnaroo, Riverbend, Gathering of the Vibes, Buffalo's Artpark, and Germany’s Rock of Ages.

The New York based band focuses on making every show an authentic Floydian experience for their fans. Known for performing a diverse mix of The Floyd’s extensive 16-album repertoire (complete with faithful renditions of popular hits as well as obscure gems), The Machine’s stellar musicianship, dramatic lighting and video, and their passionate delivery sets them above and beyond the rest.

In the classic tradition, The Machine explores collective improvisation paralleling and even rivaling that of an early 1970’s Pink Floyd mentality. Their use of expanded theatrical elements and elaborate stage displays continues in the spirit of the later Floyd lineups of the 1980’s. The band is also known for recreating entire albums as a part of their show, accepting requests from fans, and for taking an A to Z approach in which one song is played for every letter of the alphabet. Additionally, the quartet has been sharing the stage with full symphony orchestras, including the Atlanta, Detroit, Pittsburgh and San Diego Symphonies.

In 2004, Two Nights at the Keswick was released as a DVD/CD, archiving the band’s bi-annual residency at this historic Philadelphia venue. Their next release, Unplugged (2006) captures a special acoustic performance at B.B. King’s in NYC featuring rare Syd Barrett solo material and deep cuts from early Floyd albums. Live In Amsterdam, a stunning concert DVD filmed at the Pepsi Stage, was released in August of 2008.

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

General Admission Seated Event

Oct 23

Oct 23

Doors open at 6:30 pm Starts at 7:30 pm Ages 18+ Only

Price: $20

Event Information

This is a general admission seated event


Nels Cline is a major force as a guitarist and improviser, ever since he debuted on record in 1978 and as a leader in 1988. Named by Rolling Stone as one of 20 “new guitar gods” and one of the top 100 guitarists of all time, Cline has gained his widest fame as a member of acclaimed rock band Wilco since 2004. He’s known for a certain cranked-up experimental mayhem, the kind sometimes heard from his extraordinary trio the Nels Cline Singers, which released the well-received MACROSCOPE on Mack Avenue earlier in 2014. But throughout his career, Cline has undertaken projects, sometimes acoustic or semi-acoustic duos, highlighting an intimate and reflective approach that’s just as central to his artistry. With ROOM, Cline returns to Mack Avenue, creating a world of melodic beauty but also hard sonic edges and technical brilliance in the company of Julian Lage. At just 26, Lage has taken the world of jazz guitar by storm. The New York Times hails the “disarming spirit of generosity” in Lage’s music and notes the young guitarist’s “roots tangled up in jazz, folk, classical and country music.” In addition to his work with Mark O’Connor, the late Jim Hall, Anthony Wilson and a great many others, Lage leads his own groundbreaking groups as documented on the albums Gladwell and Sounding Point (the latter earning Lage a Grammy nomination). In a 2013 Q&A with JazzTimes, Lage described the Cline-Lage duo sound as “200 percent power,” and that’s exactly what comes through on ROOM: an inspired collection of originals and collaborative pieces that run the full range from intricately composed and complex to free and spontaneous. Cline builds on the strength of his previous duo work with the likes of Vinny Golia, Zeena Parkins, Elliott Sharp, Thurston Moore, Carla Bozulich, Marc Ribot and not least of all the late West Coast bassist Eric Von Essen, to which the gorgeous dual-acoustic showcase “Whispers from Eve” is dedicated. Lage, for his part, has worked in duo settings with David Grisman, Martin Taylor, John Abercrombie, Taylor Eigsti and others. Cline and Lage remain on acoustic guitars to end ROOM with “Calder,” a reference to the visionary sculptor Alexander Calder. “I have a Calder mobile that my mom sent me years ago when I moved back east,” Lage says. “It hangs in my apartment and I just love it. So though I wrote the tune first and the title came later, I felt like the presence of the mobile fit the mode of the piece well.” On ROOM one hears two guitar masters who span the generations, comfortable in every conceivable role, meeting the daunting challenges of these compositions while giving themselves over to the moment. In the JazzTimes Q&A, Cline credited the duo for revitalizing his playing overall: “I was burned out on touring, burned out on myself…. And when Julian and I started playing together it kicked my ass hard. At the same time it inspired me and refreshed my soul.” Lage replied, “Likewise.”

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Nov 8

Nov 8

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Event Information

The work of Scott Bradlee & Postmodern Jukebox has been viewed on the ensemble’s YouTube channel well over a hundred million times. Most of those doing the viewing, however, are not fully aware of the method to Bradlee’s madness.
On the surface, the method is video – clips of full-band performances (that’s Bradlee on piano) shot in the bandleader’s living room with a single stationary camera. The madness: pop hits of the present performed à la pop hits of the past. Miley Cyrus’ “We Can’t Stop” assayed as a doo- wop number; Macklemore and Ryan Lewis’ “Thrift Shop” tricked out in flapper jazz; Sam Smith’s “Stay With Me” rendered a 1940s big-band standard.
In fact, Bradlee’s method runs deeper. He’s educating his audience about 20th-century song styles; he’s commenting on the elasticity of the pop form; he’s confounding cultural context; he’s uniting generations; he’s breaking the rules. He’s manifesting postmodernist ideas in his approach to production and business as well as music. But as far as the fans are concerned, it’s just fun (and sometimes funny). Bradlee himself will tell you, simply, “I reimagine a song in another style because I want to hear it that way.”
Clearly, so does everyone else, as evidenced by PMJ’s presence on concert stages (stateside and abroad) and Billboard’s Jazz Albums chart, where its self-released 2014 opus
“Historical Misappropriation” landed in the Top 10 alongside
John Coltrane’s “Offering: Live at Temple University” and “All Rise: A Joyful Elegy for Fats Waller.”
This proximity of Bradlee’s outfit to Waller is particularly fitting; the former, a self-taught jazz pianist, considers the latter, an innovator of the Harlem stride style who helped lay the groundwork for modern jazz piano, a key influence, as is Jellyroll Morton, James P. Johnson and Art Tatum.
Which isn’t to discount the importance to Bradlee’s development of Michael Jackson’s “Bad,” the vinyl incarnation of which was, he says, “the first album I ever loved.” That was when he was six, growing up in Pattenburg, New Jersey, where he moved at four from Nesconset, New York. He took piano lessons, but they didn’t take. Then, at age 12, Bradlee heard “Rhapsody in Blue” and was forever changed. “I got the sheet music and taught myself how to play it,” he recalls. “I started wondering, ‘Where does this come from? What else sounds like this?’”
Asked what appealed to him about the popular music of the 1920s, ragtime especially, he says, “I could play it fast and loud. It was brash. And it had contempt for rules, which really appealed to me.”
Bradlee began his career as a jazz pianist during high school with a standing gig at a local eatery; he began his career as a pop-cultural provocateur during high school with a “this might be cool” ragtime medley of classic rock songs. “Not much has changed,” he says of the lyrical content of pop music. “In the 1920s, in the ’60s and ’70s, today – it’s still about love and drinking and dancing.”
He pursued Jazz Studies at the University of Hartford, then moved to New York to become a starving artist. He booked gigs, but as he puts it, “Jazz pianists are a dime a dozen in New York City.” So he moved to Astoria to save on rent and, in 2009, started making videos. “There was this niche on YouTube where people were doing experimental, interesting, funny things with music,” he notes. “It was another way to reach an audience.”
Bradlee’s first video was straight-up jazz. He didn’t have much footage of himself, however, so he decided to try a video experiment of his own: a ragtime medley of ’80s pop. He managed to amass 100 views. But through one of those viewers, Neil Gaiman discovered him. The author tweeted Bradlee’s flying fingers to his millions-strong Twitter following. Within a week, Bradlee reports, “more people had seen that video than had
seen me play live my entire life.”
Things went viral from there, affording Bradlee and the coalescing Postmodern Jukebox a receptive online crowd. Among Scott Bradlee & Postmodern Jukebox’s subsequent hits are a New Orleans-flavored take on Guns N’ Roses’ “Sweet Child o’ Mine” – 4+ million views; the “grandpa-style” reiteration of “Thrift Shop” – 6+ million views; and “We Can’t Stop” – 11.6 million views. Media coverage, including the likes of “Good Morning America” and NPR, ensued.
How does he come up with this stuff? “A lot of pop songs are constructed of elements that lend themselves to a certain feel,” he points out. “The simple progression of the bass line in ‘Blurred Lines,’ for instance, reminded me of bluegrass. ‘Sweet Child’ sounds like an old blues song – the structure, the way the chorus repeats ...” With Cyrus, it was more an instance of tongue-in- cheeky cultural criticism: “She’d gained all that notoriety from her 2013 VMA appearance. I had to recast her song for the ’50s, which everyone thinks of as this squeaky-clean era.”
Then there were the gifts from the pop-music gods, like Meghan Trainor’s #1 hit “All About That Bass.” Bradlee knew a musiciansinger named Kate Davis. “I’d wanted to do something with Kate for a while,” he reveals, “but I was waiting for the right song to come along.” Check the PMJ video for “All About That Bass” and you’ll find Davis singing – and playing stand-up bass. If you do click there, you’ll be in good company: 10 million views and counting.
The mashup of Davis and Trainor is some good old-fashioned A&R. The repertoire Bradlee selects for PMJ’s vocal artists has furnished a platform for some very talented but previously littleknown performers. And it’s not just the eyeballs afforded by YouTube; Bradlee provides an intuitive musical context for the singular gifts of these singers that allows them to be seen in a new light – it’s as if he’s somehow cracked the code to their essential appeal.
Take Puddles. “Last week, a seven-foot clown dropped by my apartment to sing an epic cover of Lorde’s ‘Royals.’ NBD,” Bradlee blogged in November of 2013. Puddles the Clown (née Michael Geier), frontman for Puddles Pity Party, is possessed of a dramatic baritone that has thrilled cabaret-goers for years – but it wasn’t until Bradlee asked Puddles to cover “Royals” in his signature style that he clicked with a mainstream audience. The reinterpretation of Lorde’s chart-topper, just one of Puddles’ collaborations with PMJ, has been viewed more than nine million times.
Discovering talent and knowing what to do with it is fundamental to the business of music. Bradlee is something of a postmodernist here, too, having achieved renown doing everything himself, mostly online, “with no budget” (i.e. using the recording equipment he’d had since college). His adherence to the DIY ethos also suggests the decidedly postmodern form of punk rock. “I was a struggling jazz pianist sitting in my basement apartment in Queens,” he attests, “but I just figured it out and made it happen.”
That said, punk rock is likely not top of mind for those attending a Scott Bradlee & Postmodern Jukebox show. The scene is more reminiscent of a speakeasy, with swells in vintage threads swilling Prohibition-era cocktails. “It’s a variety show, a musical revue featuring special guests,” Bradlee illuminates. “Coming to a PMJ show is like time-traveling back to Old Hollywood – it’s an experience.” Creating that for audiences appears to be PMJ’s ultimate mission.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Nov 11

Nov 11

Doors open at 7:15 pm Starts at 8:15 pm All ages

Event Information

Arlo Guthrie was born with a guitar in one hand and a harmonica in the other, in Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York in 1947. He is the eldest son of America's most beloved singer/writer/philosopher Woody Guthrie and Marjorie Mazia Guthrie, a professional dancer with the Martha Graham Company and founder of The Committee to Combat Huntington's Disease. For more than a decade, Arlo has toured worldwide with different shows: An America Scrapbook, beginning 1998 (with symphony orchestras), The Guthrie Family Legacy Tour, beginning 2006 (with various family members), Boys Night Out Tour, beginning 2008 (with his son, Abe Guthrie and Grandson, Krishna), The Lost World Tour, beginning 2008 (with a big band and The Burns Sisters), The Guthrie Family Rides Again Tour beginning in 2009 (with the entire family), The Journey On Tour beginning 2010 (Big band & The Burns sisters), The Guthrie Family Reunion Tour beginning 2012 (The whole family), Here Comes The Kid - The Woody Guthrie Centennial Tour beginning 2012), Here Come The Kid(s) beginning in 2013 (continuing the Woody Centennial). The Centennial celebration tour ends May 2014. Interspersed between all the tours was the recurring "Arlo Guthrie Solo Reunion Tour - Together At Last," which was certainly the best named tour. The currant version of the solo tour runs from June 2014 - November 2014. After the solo tour Arlo will put "Alice's Restaurant" back on the setlist menu for "The Alice's Restaurant 50th Anniversary Tour", with will run from January 2015 through May 2016. If he survives the "Alice 50 Tour" he will go fishing. He grew up surrounded by dancers and musicians: Pete Seeger, Ronnie Gilbert, Fred Hellerman and Lee Hays (The Weavers), Leadbelly, Cisco Houston, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, all of whom were significant influences on Arlo's musical career. Guthrie gave his first public performance in 1961 at age 13 and quickly became involved in the music that was shaping the world. Over the next few years, Arlo inherited his father's friend Pete Seeger and the two toured together, between demonstrations, beginning in the late 60's. They continued doing over a dozen shows together almost every year for the next 40 years creating a legendary collaboration that continues to this day. The last Pete & Arlo show was in November 2012 at Carnegie Hall in New York City. Arlo practically lived in the most famous venues of the "Folk Boom" era. In New York City he hung out at Gerdes Folk City, The Gaslight and The Bitter End. In Boston's Club 47, and in Philadelphia he made places like The 2nd Fret and The Main Point his home. He witnessed the transition from an earlier generation of ballad singers like Richard Dyer-Bennet and blues-men like Mississippi John Hurt, to a new era of singer-song writers such as Bob Dylan, Jim Croce, Joan Baez, and Phil Ochs. He grooved with the beat poets like Allen Ginsburg and Lord Buckley, and picked with players like Bill Monroe and Doc Watson. He learned something from everyone and developed his own style, becoming a distinctive, expressive voice in a crowded community of singer-songwriters and political-social commentators. Arlo Guthrie's career exploded in 1967 with the release of "Alice's Restaurant", whose title song premiered at the Newport Folk Festival helped foster a new commitment among the '60s generation to social consciousness and activism. Arlo went on to star in the 1969 Hollywood film version of "Alice's Restaurant", directed by Arthur Penn. With songs like "Alice's Restaurant", too long for radio airplay; "Coming into Los Angeles", banned from many radio stations (but a favorite at the 1969 Woodstock Festival); and the definitive rendition of Steve Goodman's "City of New Orleans", Guthrie was no One-Hit-Wonder. An artist of international stature, he has never had a 'hit' in the usual sense. He has usually preferred to walk to his own beat rather than march in step to the drum of popular culture. Over the last five decades Guthrie has toured throughout North America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia winning a wide, popular following. In addition to his accomplishments as a musician, playing the piano, six and twelve-string guitar, harmonica and a dozen other instruments, Arlo is a natural-born storyteller, whose tales and anecdotes figure prominently in his performances. In 1991 Arlo purchased the old Trinity Church. It was Thanksgiving 1965 that events took place at the church which inspired Arlo to write the song "Alice's Restaurant". Named for his parents, The Guthrie Center is a not-for-profit interfaith church foundation dedicated to providing a wide range of local and international services. Its outreach programs include everything from providing HIV/AIDS services to baking cookies with a local service organization; an HD walk-a-thon to raise awareness and money for a cure for Huntington's Disease, and offering a place simply to meditate. The Guthrie Foundation is a separate not-for-profit educational organization that addresses issues such as the environment, health care, cultural preservation and educational exchange. Arlo Guthrie, Rising Son Records and The Guthrie Center & Foundation are on the World Wide Web at http://www.risingsonrecords.com/

- Upcoming Highlights -

  • Untitled.jpeg
  • avett omm poster.jpeg
  • buddy g FB.jpeg
  • pixies poster.jpeg
  • bonnie FB.jpeg
  • dec omm fb sm.jpeg
  • ocms sm fb.jpeg
  • 061815_Soul-Rebels.jpg
  • PrimusPostcardSide.jpeg
  • 052915_Bowersox.jpg
  • 061915_Jessica-Pratt.jpg
  • 062115_Jim-Adkins.jpg
  • 062415_California.jpg

- Spotlight Artists -

- Just Announced -

Jun 3

Asbury Hall at Babeville - Buffalo, NY

with Mechanical River

Jun 8

Water Street Music Hall - Rochester, NY

Jun 21

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Jun 24

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Jul 24

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Sturgill Simpson

Jul 26

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Lucius

Jul 31

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Dinosaur Jr

Aug 1

Brewery Ommegang - Cooperstown, NY

with Richard Julian

- Social Updates -

The Growlers @ The Haunt - Oct 04

dansmallspresents.frontgatetickets.com

The music of The Growlers is unmistakable. Sure, you can hone in on some influences baked into the work of this California-bred band. Heck, even they’d cop to a few, like Ricky Nelson and The Clash. But once those same RIYL tags have been filtered through the minds and hands and voices of this fi

Tickets to see the GROWLERS at The Haunt on October 4th are ON SALE NOW! Get them here: https://dansmallspresents.frontgatetickets.com/event/dc2ja61yit2bpybh #DSP2015

white_logo.png

P.O. BOX 736
Ithaca, NY 14851