UPCOMING EVENTS

Water Street Music Hall - Rochester, NY

with special guests Thunder Body

Nov 1

Nov 1

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $15-$20

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16+ w/ ID

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Nov 2

Nov 2

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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“It took life for us to get to this point – Everybody was so free.
From the first notes, it sounded like an explosion of sound; we went where the songs took us with a singularity of purpose.
We came in to make music as grown-ups, to make music as men.”
– Raul Malo, lead singer of The Mavericks

The Mavericks are back. The country-steeped garage band with a Cuban American lead singer that had emerged from Miami in 1989 with their sultry debut that was equal parts innocence, intensity, and vintage influences has reunited in 2012 after an eight-year hiatus. Time has a way of melting when you’re busy living life – and two decades have passed since their polyrhythmic brand of post-modern country has given the world “All You Ever Do Is Bring Me Down,” “Here Comes The Rain,” and “Dance The Night Away.”

With their new album, time melts once again, and the band that defied definitions, blurred genres, and made everybody feel good is back. The “most interesting band in the world” has captured the infectious energy and robust sound from their live shows on their new Valory Music release In Time. Songs like “Dance In The Moonlight,” the Orbison-esque “Born To Be Blue,” the horn-punctuated retro noir “Back In Your Arms Again,” and the Tejano-esque “All Over Again” show that the Mavericks have once again found the way to make genre-defying soul music.

The Dock - Ithaca, NY

with The Green Gallows and Catherine Irwin Duo

Nov 6

Nov 6

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $10-$13

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Meghann Wright’s songs of love, liquored memories, heartbreak, and resilience resonate with anyone listening. The Brooklyn-based Singer/Songwriter is a songstress that finds her way into all of our hearts, traveling a path paved with lost loves through a life of contrasts that can be felt and heard the moment you push play. A daunting childhood in a family of talented musicians, Meghann stood out in the culturally-diverse, destitute, and ignored parts of Hawaii. Her move to New York City showed a willingness to change and grow. Jamming with musicians in the eclectic Metro scene, she could be heard with metal and hardcore bands one night, and playing folk and indie rock the next. Her voice is accessible and alluring: she embraces the closing-time bluntness of Amy Winehouse, the strength and conviction of Sheryl Crow, the husky soul of Janis Joplin and Adele, and even the twang, catchiness and subtle grit of Dolly Parton. But in these dissimilar styles, Meghann finds a common thread that’s recognizable when she sings. Her lyrics tell stories of struggles and strength while her voice comforts and touches the soul. And Meghann touches the soul easily. “Can’t Carry Water” has the weight similar ballads try for. Its wounded-soul country-folk ascends to something poignant through adding layers of guitars and wavering vocal harmonies that would make Emmylou Harris grin. “Left My Heart in Brooklyn” is similar, but the warmth she feels for the eponymous borough keeps it lighter, letting it shift from blue to hopeful. Then there’s “Cocaine,” an ode to self-emancipation and benders that stretch to daylight. The song’s gleeful vulgarity kicks you in the throat, but ends reminding you that no matter how great the blow and whiskey are, the broken heart remains. Meghann’s songs are largely inspired by her adopted hometown of Brooklyn, where her DIY ethos has caught the eye of the music industry and the hearts of fans. She supports other artists with The City & The Heart, a showcase for female NYC-based singer/songwriters. From playing dozens of shows to hosting open mic nights throughout New York, Meghann works relentlessly to build a name as an artist with something to give back to her city, her craft, and her conscience. Playing dimly lit bars, working double shifts to stay afloat, and writing songs in empty apartments overlooking a well-known skyline helped mend the soul that’s present in Meghann’s music. We’re familiar with the needling pain of heartbreak and the hazy journeys to forget it; the thread stitching hurt and happiness together is evident in her music and connects you to it. And whether it needs folk, country, soul, or pop, Meghann Wright assures you that she has a handle on whatever’s necessary to tell a story. What matters to her is the heart and soul of the song, how to get to it, and making sure you both enjoy and feel it.

Water Street Music Hall - Rochester, NY

with The Falconers

Nov 7

Nov 7

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $20-$25

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16+ w/ ID

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

with Bambu & DJ Last Word

Nov 7

Nov 7

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $15-$20

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

Fully recharged and inspired by his eye-opening first trip to Mecca, the 2011 uprisings in the Middle East, and the world wide Occupy movements, Brother Ali is prepared to unveil his fourth full-length offering Mourning in America and Dreaming in Color. Created during a self-imposed two-month exile in Seattle and helmed by platinum-selling producer Jake One (50 Cent, T.I., Wiz Khalifa), the album presents a scathing yet honest critique of America and its many flaws while simultaneously presenting a hopeful outlook of its possibilities. Preceded by the release of free music downloads with accompanying music videos such as “Shine On," "Writer’s Block,” and “Not A Day Goes By," Mourning in America and Dreaming in Color is the pièce de résistance.

In an age of hip-hop where the paradigm of swag over substance reigns supreme, few emcees are willing to use their platform to tackle the hot-button topics and pressing social maladies of our time - but it’s apparent that Minneapolis-based hip-hop artist Brother Ali is one of those few. Over the course of 14 tracks with assists from esteemed author/ professor Dr. Cornel West, revered Southern hip-hop icon Bun B, and Def Poetry Jam poet Amir Sulaiman, the album brazenly holds a mirror to the idiosyncrasies of American life while simultaneously painting a vibrant portrait of its wondrous potential. Actualizing hip-hop’s full range of motion as a gage for the times, Mourning In America and Dreaming In Color asserts itself as the definitive soundtrack of a disenchanted, disenfranchised, and wildly optimistic citizenry during a landmark period in American history. In a moment of artistic preemptive strike, Brother Ali recognized this prime opportunity to examine and address the underpinnings of the burgeoning stance of mass opposition:

“This is not just a new album, but a new chapter. There’s a kind of democratic reawakening in people at this point in time. I was really looking to take these topics and really hit them hard. To try to open ears and hearts and invite people to take some action and feel empowered. To be engaged and take some agency and responsibility for what’s going on in the world.”

Melding the zeitgeist of classic works such as Ice Cube’s critical 1991 album Death Certificate and Marvin Gaye’s 1971 sociopolitical opus What’s Goin’ On with his keen observations on topics such as race, the Occupy movement, and the hypocrisy of war, Brother Ali has crafted a fresh lyrical approach and dynamic new sound - the result is a stunning collection of hard-hitting lyrics and beats.

The state of the union address commences with “Letter To My Countrymen,” a spirited appeal to fellow Americans with a tailor made guest vocal from Cornel West. Brother Ali speaks on the institution of poverty on “Only Life I Know” while the quasi-autobiographical “Stop The Press” addresses his albinism, the death of his father, and his remarkable yet challenging journey through hip-hop. “Mourning In America,” in part the album’s title track, offers a brutally honest look at America’s convoluted and hypocritical relationship to murder. Featuring a searing verse from poet Amir Sulaiman, “Gather Round” is a battle cry to the masses to take an ardent interest in the social ills plaguing society. Brother Ali puts underemployment and hyper consumerism in the face of socioeconomic turmoil on blast on “Work Everyday.” “Need A Knot,” featuring the voice of Bun B, finds Brother Ali skillfully veiling a series of odd jobs in analogies of illegal hustles. “Namesake” is the seldom-told tale of a pre-fame Muhammad Ali – one of America’s most dynamic personas whom Brother Ali is also named after. The set ends with the outro “Singing This Song,” a track that showcases another one of Brother Ali’s passions – speaking engagements. The song features highlights of Ali's riveting public address at a mass demonstration demanding justice for Trayvon Martin.

Mourning in America and Dreaming in Color, in all its sonic and lyrical glory, promises to be both the voice of a burgeoning new critical American consciousness and the beacon of hope for those that hold fast to its ideals and potential.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

with Girlpool

Nov 8

Nov 8

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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Jenny Lewis returns with her new album, The Voyager, on July 29th. The Los Angeles artist’s first solo LP since 2008’s Acid Tongue, The Voyager is Lewis’s most deeply personal, and her most musically robust. Featuring production work from Ryan Adams, Beck, as well as Lewis and her longtime collaborator Johnathan Rice, The Voyager finds Lewis at her sharp-witted best, singing about her recent life with honesty and incisiveness. And then there’s her voice, which was already a force to be reckoned with, but sounds even richer, more nuanced, more powerful. Lewis says The Voyager was the hardest album she has ever made, documenting her struggle to cope following the death of her estranged father in 2010 and the subsequent break-up of her band, Rilo Kiley. In the three years she worked on it, there were moments she thought she’d never finish. But, more than ever before, she knew she had to. The story is best told in Lewis’s own words:
Making The Voyager got me through one of the most difficult periods of my life. After Rilo Kiley broke up and a few really intense personal things happened, I completely melted down. It nearly destroyed me. I had such severe insomnia that, at one point, I didn’t sleep for 5 straight nights. Many of the songs on The Voyager came out of the need to occupy my mind in the moments when I just couldn’t shut down.
I asked for help from a lot of places. The first song on the album, “Head Under Water,” is about some of that. I really did get hypnotized. I tried everything. I got acupuncture. I did neurofeedback. I did massage therapy. I looked in the phonebook for a healer in Studio City and I met this woman who barely touched me for an hour and then wrote on index cards about what I was going through. All this just to try and get to sleep! I was ready to call the psychic hotline, “Tell me when this fucking thing is gonna be over.”
I recorded through my father’s death and terrible insomnia and all of the related fall-out. I just kept recording. Some of it was good and some of it wasn’t, but it took my mind off what was going on. Over the course of a couple years, I recorded dozens of demos, often trying multiple versions of the same song. I knew I had to finish it. And every single one of my friends helped me get there. This record took an entire village of musicians, including Ryan Adams, Beck, Johnathan Rice, Farmer Dave Scher, Blake Mills, Benmont Tench, Jason Boesel, Nathaniel Walcott, Alex Greenwald, Lou Barlow, First Aid Kit, the Watson Twins, Z. Berg, and Becky Stark, among others.
“Just One Of The Guys” was one of the tunes I’d tried a few different ways before I finally recorded it with Beck, at his home studio in Malibu. He ended up producing the song and contributing backing vocals. The whole experience was super laid-back — walking on the beach, talking about movies and the Rolling Stones and French pop music. It was just very mellow and lovely. But that was on the eve of my meltdown, and I didn’t go back again for a year.
I took a break from recording last spring and summer to tour with The Postal Service, for the tenth anniversary of our album, Give Up. It felt so good to play those songs. Every night I got crazy chills. I’d look down and the hair on my arm would be standing on end during “The District Sleeps Alone Tonight.” After having been a front-person for most of my career, it was an amazing time to just be there on the side, to support Ben and Jimmy. It was a great path back to myself, in a way. But the whole time I was out there, I was thinking, “This is wonderful, but I need to be playing my songs. I need to finish up this album once and for all.”
I was searching for a spirit guide. With everything that was going on in my life these past few years, I wanted to try ceding control. It can be a relief, at a certain point in your creative life. You let in a bit of criticism and it frees you up. And Ryan Adams and his partner Mike Viola were the final piece of the puzzle. Ryan and I didn’t know each other very well before this album — we had hardly even listened to one another’s music, to be honest. But I’d heard he built this awesome studio, Pax Am, at Sunset Sound, so I hit him up and asked if I could come in and record something. We put together a band — Ryan on guitar, Griffin Goldsmith from Dawes on drums, Gus Seyffert on bass, Mike on guitar and piano — and booked time for the very next day after I got back from the Postal Service tour.
I had this song, “She’s Not Me,” and I wasn’t really happy with any of the versions of it I’d tried. We ended up doing it in a different key, with a different tempo, with a part cut out. The biggest change was doing it live. There’s just something palpable about a group of people playing music live in a room together. The session was so fluid: I taught the band the changes, we did two takes, and that was it. I thought, “Well, that was awesome,” but Ryan wouldn’t let us listen back to it. The entire two weeks we were in the studio, we never listened to playback of anything, we just moved onto the next song.
Some of his methods infuriated me at the time, but I thrive in that environment — having some conflict to resolve, or having to prove myself. I was showing Ryan that I had something to say, and he knew how to annoy me into that perfect spot. We would get into these philosophical arguments about how to make records. Every time I wanted to put a harmony on a song, Ryan would ask me, “Do you come from a musical theater background?” His argument was that great songs, with great stories, don’t need background vocals. He would say, “Morrissey doesn’t use background vocals.” And I would yell: “Well, I do!”
I trusted the vision, and Ryan ended up being the person to get me over the fear of finishing something I’d been working on for so long. He found me when I was in a weird, tough spot, and he really helped me. And then we got to know each other as friends: You’re singing these songs and you’re weeping in front of your new bro who’s producing your record, and it’s heavy.
While I was in it, I couldn’t see my way out. But eventually, I started feeling better and the insomnia passed. I can sleep again, but I’m certainly a different person now. This record was the hardest one I’ve ever made. I truly thought I was never going to finish it, but I did. The Voyager tells that story: the longest night of my life and the journey to finally getting some rest.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Nov 8

Nov 8

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $15-$20

Event Information

Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

If you’ve been paying attention, you’ll know that Kings And Queens is a synthesis of every aspect of John Brown’s Body’s storied career. It’s as if, after close to two decades of existence, this pioneering band has finally crafted their ultimate statement, tying together styles they’ve dabbled in, paid respect to, created, or pushed forward into one tightly woven mosaic. JBB’s Future Roots is now present tense.

John Brown’s Body formed (in Boston in the mid 1990s) at a time when there wasn’t what you’d call a U.S. reggae scene. The American bands that played reggae were regional at best, touring little, and many were primarily cover bands of the best known Jamaican reggae. JBB was one of a handful of groups that began touring nationally and created distinctly American reggae, steeped in traditional vibes but incorporating elements from other genres. Whereas most groups tackled typical reggae themes –religion and marijuana – JBB acted more like an indie band, writing songs that used the vocabulary of reggae to express their own experiences. Over time, this style has become the norm. The U.S. scene has grown tremendously – to the point of having two bands debut records in the Billboard Top 20 in 2012 – and many in the genre point to John Brown’s Body as a key influence.

However, this is not your typical story of an influential band doing what they did 20 years ago now trying to cash in on the movement they helped foment. Because a funny thing happened along the way for John Brown’s Body – they evolved and grew, taking their music ever forward, and have continued to influence the scene as much today – some might even say more so today – than they did at the start. The band’s relentless touring schedule helped pave the way for the nationwide scene, showing other bands that it was okay to be from the Northeast and still be comfortable playing in California, Hawaii, Colorado or Iowa. Early on, members of the band formed their own record label to highlight their local scene, which has since become the norm in many pockets of the scene. JBB delved deeply into dub effects from the start, incorporating elements of electronic music well before that became standard for today’s bands. Yet, JBB is somehow still utterly unique within the scene, even after two decades at work, which brings us back to the record at hand.

Musically and lyrically, lead singer/songwriter Elliot Martin has crafted a work that seems both self-reflective and visionary. A song like “Old John Brown” is obviously open to interpretation that Martin is commenting on both the man for whom the band is named after, as well as the legacy of the band itself. Musically, the song evokes riddims Burning Spear used in the 1970s, which has been an undercurrent influence on the group since the beginning, but has rarely surfaced as obviously as it does here since the band’s earliest breakthrough records.

The group’s last full-length record, Amplify (#1 on the Billboard Reggae chart in 2008), was extremely forward-thinking, steeped in electronic effects. Last Fall’s JBB IN DUB EP (#1 on iTunes’ Reggae Chart) stripped things down to the bedrock elements of reggae. Kings And Queens utilizes the best aspects of both these records, while bringing back much more of the classic JBB sound into the mix and production. This is reinforced by working with engineer Matt Saccuccimorano, who worked on some of the band’s earliest successful albums, and the involvement on numerous songs by former guitarist/keyboardist Nate “Silas” Richardson. Bassist Nate Edgar continues to astonish with his nimble and muscular bass lines. The bass and drums have always been at the center of Martin’s songwriting, but in Edgar and founding drummer Tommy Benedetti, he has found his most spectacular partners-in-crime. Martin has crafted his strongest batch of songs ever, coupled with startling horn lines written by the JBB Horns. Saying the JBB Horns are an influential bunch is no small talk, considering past alums have gone on to play for Slightly Stoopid as well as form the eclectically amazing band Rubblebucket.

The most obvious touch point for the band’s sound has always been classic UK reggae, especially the work of Aswad, Steel Pulse and Dennis Bovell, and that unmistakable influence permeates every track, most noticeably in the heavy drum and bass and complicated horn lines. As it was in that scene, JBB’s songs are more focused on sufferation, urban realities and overcoming, with songs like “Plantation,” “Empty Hands,” and “The Battle” sparking protest over haunting minor chords. This is not beach resort reggae. This is reality. However, the record is by no means all gloom and doom! Songs like “Shine Bright” and the love song “Fall On Deep” both add lightness, and even in his darkest metaphors, Martin can find hope and positivity (listen to the chorus of “Plantation” for evidence of that).
Kings And Queens is bookended by three songs (“Step Inside” and “Invitation” at the start and “Searchlight” at the end) that invite listeners into the live arena where this band has excelled from the beginning. Evoking sound systems from the music’s origins in 1960s Jamaica as well as JBB’s own powerful live show, these songs remind all listeners about the strength in numbers found in the reggae community, especially at live shows and festivals, and how John Brown’s Body has long been one of the greatest live acts in the genre.

This record shows that John Brown’s Body continues to lead from the front of the pack. They look forward by looking back and find a way to invite JBB fans from all eras into their packed and sweaty tent. As the opening song says, “So many people / Step inside, step inside / Come one and all / Got to make the dancehall tight.”

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

with Big Data

Nov 9

Nov 9

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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Brimming with imagination, energy and genre-smashing scope, Fitz and The Tantrums defied the odds to become an indisputable phenomenon, a chart-topping, show-stopping modern pop combo unlike any other. The Los Angeles-based sextet– comprised of Fitz (vocals), Noelle Scaggs (vocals/tambourine), James King (saxophone, flute), Jeremy Ruzumna (keyboards), John Wicks (drums, percussion) and Joseph Karnes (bass) – played its first show in December 2008 at Hollywood’s Hotel Café. After the self-released 2009 EP Songs for a Breakup, Vol. 1, Fitz and The Tantrums found themselves appearing on KCRW’s “Morning Becomes Eclectic,” touring with Maroon 5 and recording their full-length debut, Pickin’ Up the Pieces. The album, which was awarded three-and-a-half stars by Rolling Stone, spent 73 weeks on Billboard’s Heatseekers chart, peaking at No. 1. The band was named a “You Oughta Know” artist by VH1 and views for the video for the hit single “MoneyGrabber” surpassed three million. For their 2013 Elektra Records debut, More Than Just A Dream, Fitz and The Tantrums worked with producer Tony Hoffer (Beck, M83, Phoenix) and ramped up the timeless song craft and sonic force that made them a worldwide sensation.

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Nov 10

Nov 10

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

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The bluegrass-based jam band the String Cheese Incident is comprised of mandolinist/violinist Michael Kang, guitarist Bill Nershi, bassist Keith Moseley, pianist Kyle Hollingsworth, and percussionists Jason Hann and Michael Travis. Formed in Boulder, Colorado, in 1993, the group's self-described "sacrilegious mix of bluegrass, calypso, salsa, Afro-pop, funk, rock, and jazz" quickly built up a following on the local club circuit, and within six months of their formation they earned an invitation to open the legendary Telluride Bluegrass Festival.

Born on the Wrong Planet They initially gigged simply in exchange for free lift tickets at ski resorts throughout the western U.S., but as the String Cheese Incident's popularity grew they began taking their music more seriously, soon averaging upwards of 170 live dates each year and eventually setting up their own record label, Sci Fidelity. Their debut LP, Born on the Wrong Planet, appeared in 1997, followed later that year by A String Cheese Incident Live. The group resurfaced in 1998 with 'Round the Wheel, followed by the live Carnival '99. It's About Time and Outside Inside arrived in 2001, followed by a deluge of live recordings chronicling the band's massive 2003 tour. They released another studio album called Untying the Not that same year, followed by another string of live albums. One Step Closer, which was produced by Malcolm Burn (Emmylou Harris, Kaki King) in their hometown of Boulder, Colorado, arrived in 2005.

The following year they announced they'd be taking a break from touring after a busy schedule of shows and summer festivals. However, unable to stay away from the stage for too long, the band booked a handful of shows in 2007, including appearances at Bonnaroo and the 10,000 Lakes Festival, while in 2008 they appeared at the Rothbury Music Festival with their various solo and side projects. The band returned to Rothbury for their only appearance together in 2009, and then announced a summer tour in 2010. A relentless schedule of shows continued in 2011/2012, before they entered the studio in 2013 to lay down some of their extensively road-tested songs. Their fifth studio album, Song in My Head, issued in 2014.

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Nov 14

Nov 14

Doors open at 8:00 pm Starts at 9:00 pm Ages 16+ Only

Price: $12-$15

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Age policy: 16+ with ID / under 16 with a parent or guardian

The energy of rock n’ roll is impossible to categorize – mercurial, specific to its beholder and profoundly reflective. From the Binghamton, New York music scene comes Driftwood, a band with a rock n’ roll soul and a folk art mind. Carving out a name for themselves with electrifying live performances, they bring one of the most unique, raw sounds to the Americana/roots music scene. Incorporating upright bass, banjo, acoustic guitar and violin, the ghost of traditional American folk music lives in their palette. But the melodies, the harmonies and the lyrics are something else entirely. “We started off playing rock in high school. Then studying jazz and classical music in college. Then we dove headfirst into folk and bluegrass. At some point I guess we kind of met in the middle”, says guitarist/songwriter Dan Forsyth. Drawing on aspects of everything from 0ld-time recordings to 1960’s R&B, the music is crafted to serve the songs. With fast-growing audiences singing along at live shows, it’s easy to tell the primary focus is on song. “We recognized early on that one of our strongest points was songwriting. The greatest songs transcend genre and time and this was one of the motivating ideas behind the band at the start”, says banjo player/songwriter Joe Kollar. Trading lead vocals between Forsyth, Kollar and violinist Claire Byrne, the group’s stage dynamics are as captivating as the songs. “I give so much of myself when I play because I deem it necessary in order to do the music justice”, says Byrne, whose violin-shredding performances galvanize fans. Songs or shredding, “There’s a reason people won’t let them off the stage”, says Jess Novak from The Syracuse New Times.
Coming from a town not often recognized for music but predominantly for industry, being the home of Twilight Zone author Rod Serling and donning the title of the “Carousel Capital of the World”, it’s easy to wonder how this not-so-traditional string band came out of the Binghamton music scene. “What people don’t often realize is that bands like Old Crow Medicine Show, The Horseflies and The Highwoods String Band came out of this same area and had a huge influence on us”, says Forsyth. “We played a lot of old-time in the beginning and it was a huge part of our band learning to play music together”.
Formed in 2005, the band spent four years playing just about anywhere they could. “We just wanted to be able to play for any crowd and turn heads”, says banjo player Joe Kollar. “We played everywhere. Coffee houses, bars, churches, rock clubs, Bluegrass festivals and the streets…a lot on the streets. We didn’t make any money, but what we learned was invaluable”.
After the release of their Debut CD “Rally Day” in 2009, the band has spent most of the last 4 years on the road. With club and festival appearances alongside of artists such as Bela Fleck, Old Crow Medicine Show, Rusted Root, Del McCoury, Brett Dennen, The Wailers, Railroad Earth, Robert Randolph, Rubblebucket, Leon Russell, Emmylou Harris and Donna the Buffalo, Driftwood is making serious waves on the East Coast scene. In the last three years they’ve played over 475 shows. With the release of their second CD “A Rock & Roll Heart” in 2011, the band landed spins on a slew of great radio shows and stations such as WFUV’s Sunday Breakfast with John Platt (New York, NY); KZSU (Stanford, CA), WCBE (Columbus, OH), WNRN (Charlottesville, VA), WUNC (Chapel Hill), NC and WDVX (Knoxville, TN).
In November 2012, Driftwood started work on their third and latest CD. Despite a grueling tour schedule and very little time at home, the recordings were finished in the summer of 2013. The self-titled new disc was recorded in a church outside of Ithaca, NY with Grammy-winning engineer Robby Hunter. It is set to be released on December 3rd, 2013.

- Upcoming Highlights -

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- Spotlight Artists -

- Just Announced -

Nov 2

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Nov 8

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

with Girlpool

Nov 9

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

with Big Data

Nov 17

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Nov 21

Water Street Music Hall - Rochester, NY

Nov 22

State Theatre of Ithaca - Ithaca, NY

Mar 5

The Haunt - Ithaca, NY

Apr 11

The Hangar Theatre - Ithaca, NY

- Social Updates -

DSP fall LOCAL MUSIC 11/8 John Brown's Body 11/14 Driftwood 11/15 Anna Coogan 11/28 The Gunpoets 12/27 The Blind Spots 12/31 Jimkata And all the support acts too!

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P.O. BOX 736
Ithaca, NY 14851